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Old 12-26-2013, 09:08 AM   #1 (permalink)
chomps1211
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: S.E. Mich.
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Default 1st Try Carving. Not terrible, but....

Since I had the local pretty much all to myself last night I thought I'd see if I could manage laying down anything that reasonably resembled a "real" carve. I don't think I did too bad for a first attempt, but I noticed something coming out of my toe side turns that felt more than a little sketchy.

I was riding my 157 NS Proto CT (regular rider.) on a fairly mellow section of what passes for a blue run here. Had decent speed but nothing approaching Mach!

As I am coming out of the toe side carve, getting upright again with board flat ready to transition to heel side. It felt like the toe side edge on the tail of the board, rear foot, was either trying to catch, or still somewhat engaged.

At this point in the turn I was probably somewhere between 30-45- or 50 degrees angled across the fall line, toe side still mostly upslope. (...not sure if that has anything to do with the issue. ) This happened at least 3-5 times during those transitions from toe to heel and it felt like I could have eaten shit from any one of them.

Is it likely that I've still got too much weight to the rear of the board at this part of the transition? I understood that to produce a good carve, you do need to weight the rear of the board's edge at some point throughout the arc of the turn. Maybe I'm staying there too late?



btw,.. looking down on my lines from the lift, It looked like I had some really nice thin edged tracks, and at the transitions, there was about an 18-24 inch gap in the track where the board was flat & the line jumped from toe to heel edge & vice versa!
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