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Thread: Heelside Carves
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Old 01-07-2012, 11:01 PM   #10 (permalink)
AAA
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Join Date: Feb 2008
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Snowolf, For the given edge angle, softboot setups typically need deeper knee bend/more angulation. Alpine deck lengths vary widely depending on the speed, intended carve radii, and conditions, from the mid 150's up, suited to the rider. No longer necessarily stiff, newer shapes and materials have made alpine decks much eaiser to carve...and more versatile and forgiving in the last 5 or so years. Deck length goes hand in hand with rider weight, sidecut, aggressiveness, speed, etc. Slalom radius decks usually start in the the 150's. GS decks commonly go to 185 or so. A rare few go to 200+. "Ice coast" freecarve decks seem to mostly range in the 160's and 170's. I'm fond of my 182, but have to rail a little harder in heavy crowds.

With the newer decambered nose/tail geometry, even a "long" board rides like much shorter board when skidded turns are needed because the nose and tail aren't set with a high enough edge angle to be engaged with bulk of the cambered body. When carving (using high edge angles), they are engaged, and help intitiate with hookup, guidance, and release, and provide the full running length for maximum edgehole. The "titanal" aluminum alloy now used in most high end decks also has an incredible dampening property, taking away significant chatter. The now-prevalent variable sidecut also has a dramatic impact on initiation, release, and overall variable turning radius. Of course, some models are "hold onto your @ss", rip down the fall line setups, but we've come a long way from the PJ, baby.

No wild technique specialization neccessary, beyond adapting to angles and performance.

Last edited by AAA; 01-07-2012 at 11:05 PM.
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