Extended Column Test - Page 3 - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-19-2011, 02:09 PM   #21 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
hikeswithdogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Minnesota Summer--Utah Winter
Posts: 992
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by killclimbz View Post
To be honest, if I feel that sketched out, that I want to do numerous pits, I'm probably just going to go conservative instead. There will always be another day.
but don't you think you would get drastically different ECT results based on altitude and slope aspect?

I'm not necessary talking about a full snow pit\ECT test but even a ski pole test where you just spot check skinning up or coming down looking for extremely weak layers based on resistance to pressure.

I'm legitimately asking here because I'm still trying to wrap my head around all of it.
__________________
makingfreshtracks.blogspot.com
hikeswithdogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-19-2011, 03:07 PM   #22 (permalink)
Veteran Member
 
killclimbz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Front Range
Posts: 10,843
Default

I have gotten drastically different ECT results in pits less than 20ft apart on the same aspect. Does that make sense?

Of course snow is going to be a completely different animal on a Southwest facing slope compared to a Northeast facing slope. It'll be different snow at 6k ft versus 10k ft for sure. Observational data as you are skinning, hiking, is huge. Recent avalanche activity, shooting cracks, whumpfing, feeling layers with your ski poles, getting off the skin track onto small wind pillows, seeing if you can get a reaction, that type of stuff. When I start talking "spatial variability" I am usually talking about the slope, aspect, that I am considering. That immediate area. Ideally, you could dig a couple of pits, check out the snow, for the full range of the slope you are planning on hitting. The reality is, unless you are hiking up said slope, you can't. So you have to pay attention to all the other clues. Like the recent activity, snow fall, winds, temperature, in addition to you snow pit tests on a given slope. Terrain management when you are riding down is key too. If you are riding a wide open 35 degree slope and there is a lone tree in the middle, do you want to ride close to that tree? Probably not. Picking safe zones, riding ridges where stuff if it breaks will break below you, everything you do when you're riding, you want to keep safety in front of your mind.
killclimbz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2011, 03:21 PM   #23 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
hikeswithdogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Minnesota Summer--Utah Winter
Posts: 992
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by killclimbz View Post
I have gotten drastically different ECT results in pits less than 20ft apart on the same aspect. Does that make sense?

Of course snow is going to be a completely different animal on a Southwest facing slope compared to a Northeast facing slope. It'll be different snow at 6k ft versus 10k ft for sure. Observational data as you are skinning, hiking, is huge. Recent avalanche activity, shooting cracks, whumpfing, feeling layers with your ski poles, getting off the skin track onto small wind pillows, seeing if you can get a reaction, that type of stuff. When I start talking "spatial variability" I am usually talking about the slope, aspect, that I am considering. That immediate area. Ideally, you could dig a couple of pits, check out the snow, for the full range of the slope you are planning on hitting. The reality is, unless you are hiking up said slope, you can't. So you have to pay attention to all the other clues. Like the recent activity, snow fall, winds, temperature, in addition to you snow pit tests on a given slope. Terrain management when you are riding down is key too. If you are riding a wide open 35 degree slope and there is a lone tree in the middle, do you want to ride close to that tree? Probably not. Picking safe zones, riding ridges where stuff if it breaks will break below you, everything you do when you're riding, you want to keep safety in front of your mind.

Good to hear! Everything you just said jives with what I've been taught and was thinking. And no I would avoid that sad little lone tree because it sounds more like avy trigger point than a legit anchor or safe zone :-)
__________________
makingfreshtracks.blogspot.com

Last edited by hikeswithdogs; 12-19-2011 at 03:27 PM.
hikeswithdogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:31 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums