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Old 04-04-2010, 11:04 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Before you run to the Patent Office, document your idea and seal it in an envelope. Then mail the envelope to yourself and store it as a legal document. You can also add a seal across the back of the envelope, such as your signature.
I've heard different things about this. Some people believe it holds as much weight as a patent, while others say it's basically worthless.
To be honest, I'm leaning towards worthless.
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Old 04-04-2010, 11:11 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Could you show me what you mean by their tools-free binding adjustment?
I can't find a pic with a quick Google search.
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Old 04-04-2010, 11:40 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Lol no. It's a quick-install system that removes the need for using a screwdriver, but is still compatible with standard boards.
Interesting. Sounds similar to the Atomic PIQ mounting plate that are used by some rental shops. Fully tool-less adjustment of binding angles on board without removing the bindings. Check it out. www.atomicsnowboarding.com

As for your main question, always protect yourself first. This is the essentially the same as writing a book and sending it to publishers unsolicited trying to find a buyer. You're just asking to get ripped off unless you cover yourself first. You'll probably want to due a fairly thorough patent search to ensure it isn't already patented by someone. Just because you don't see product in the market doesn't mean someone hasn't already patented the idea (and thousands of patents never make it as a marketable product).
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:36 AM   #14 (permalink)
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I've heard different things about this. Some people believe it holds as much weight as a patent, while others say it's basically worthless.
To be honest, I'm leaning towards worthless.
It does not hold as much weight as a patent. However, while waiting during the patent process, it can provide an inventor with enough leverage if their idea is stolen. The post office time date stamp is a legal stamp only indicating time of documentation. A notary's stamp binds that the person signing the document is in fact the person in question and usually used for contracts.
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:19 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by CoopersTroopers View Post
Interesting. Sounds similar to the Atomic PIQ mounting plate that are used by some rental shops. Fully tool-less adjustment of binding angles on board without removing the bindings. Check it out. www.atomicsnowboarding.com
That's a pretty cool idea, but it's different than what I have planned lol
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:40 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Nito View Post
Before you run to the Patent Office, document your idea and seal it in an envelope. Then mail the envelope to yourself and store it as a legal document. You can also add a seal across the back of the envelope, such as your signature.
Just FYI... It's an old writer's/musician's trick, but it's unfortunately an old wive's tale and it won't hold up in court.
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:24 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Just FYI... It's an old writer's/musician's trick, but it's unfortunately an old wive's tale and it won't hold up in court.
Dave,
What you are talking about is copyrighting. You are correct that SSASE won't hold up in court when IP for liturature are concerned. The reason for this is that literature has been reiterated in so many forms so many times the basic concept are universal. With the exception of the Iliad, the Odyssey and Gilgamesh; I can't think of any truly original literature that does not borrow from some other source. BTW, I am not a lit major, so don't hold me to this. We can also discuss Shakespeare but I think I've made my point.

In regards to technology, a SSASE will not override a patent unless there is a timing issue in question. Normally, patents take a long time to process during which time developmental leaks or similar thoughts/ideas/concepts can occur. Therefore, if someone tries to patent an idea while a patent has already been submitted for approval, a SSASE can be used to prove time and data but not theft. Note, many people have the same idea/concept, it is the implementation of said concept into a usable device that will determine who wins the patent right.

Finally, many companies do not patent devices or processes due to theft. Companies get around patents by making subtle justifiable modifications to original product.

Hope this helps - Nito
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Old 04-06-2010, 09:25 AM   #18 (permalink)
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I'm pretty sure this idea has something to do with changing the structure of the board to include a mechanism that allows the bindings to lock into place. This will most likely become proprietary and you can already see the results of proprietary equipment by the massive amounts of hate that Burton receives.

If you do succeed (I sincerely hope you do because that would be awesome), you have to consider the consumers. Are snowboarders ready for such a big change?

Realize that with locking mechanisms, you have much more chance for mechanical failures. With screws, they slowly come loose, but have a very simple solution to avoid problems... keep a pocket tool with you and check your bindings before each run. If your new mounting mechanism fails, what is the snowboarder going to be left with as a fix? Do you also have a tool system that snowboarders can take with them for a quick adjustment? Tool-less systems aren't neccessarily better for all things. For building a computer, tool-less is great since it usually sits stationary anyways and has little chance of failure. For snowboarding, the bindings and board constantly has varying amounts of force applied to them including bumps and crashes. This is the beauty of having the bindings utilize tool adjustment. You can tweak stuff to make sure it stays fastened (as long as there is no breakage of course).

Not trying to be a downer, rather I want to give you more perspective so you can make your idea that much better. The idea is just one small part of the bigger picture. Cover all your bases and then approach the company.
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Old 04-06-2010, 09:47 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Leo View Post
I'm pretty sure this idea has something to do with changing the structure of the board to include a mechanism that allows the bindings to lock into place. This will most likely become proprietary and you can already see the results of proprietary equipment by the massive amounts of hate that Burton receives.

If you do succeed (I sincerely hope you do because that would be awesome), you have to consider the consumers. Are snowboarders ready for such a big change?

Realize that with locking mechanisms, you have much more chance for mechanical failures. With screws, they slowly come loose, but have a very simple solution to avoid problems... keep a pocket tool with you and check your bindings before each run. If your new mounting mechanism fails, what is the snowboarder going to be left with as a fix? Do you also have a tool system that snowboarders can take with them for a quick adjustment? Tool-less systems aren't neccessarily better for all things. For building a computer, tool-less is great since it usually sits stationary anyways and has little chance of failure. For snowboarding, the bindings and board constantly has varying amounts of force applied to them including bumps and crashes. This is the beauty of having the bindings utilize tool adjustment. You can tweak stuff to make sure it stays fastened (as long as there is no breakage of course).

Not trying to be a downer, rather I want to give you more perspective so you can make your idea that much better. The idea is just one small part of the bigger picture. Cover all your bases and then approach the company.
I can assure you, it won't require changing the board at all. I'd love to give more details, but the fact is, I don't know who's reading these forums and I really don't want to give anything away just to be screwed over by some asshat stealing my idea. I can say it is a modification of the current screw-in system for the bindings only - not the board. It isn't a new lock-in system. I do appreciate all of the advice though!
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Old 04-06-2010, 04:25 PM   #20 (permalink)
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you already gave it away

but anyways, im sure many people have though about a tool-less binding mounting mechanism (including myself). the question is, is it worth it? how much will it cost to manufacture this feature? is there a need for it? will people demand it? there are nothing cheaper than the traditional screw-in, just provide a hole! so far, people dont complain about mounting bindings... but if your idea is good, it would be a good idea to patent it ASAP or at least document it in forms that can prove the date of your invention. you never know what people demands... it would be great for people with a binding fetish...

Last edited by yusoweird; 04-06-2010 at 04:34 PM.
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