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Old 11-17-2010, 04:31 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Help with my Flows....

Yesterday I broke in my new set up... 2011 Lib Tech TRS and 2010 Flow NXT-AT's...... I can't say enough about the TRS, my god what an incredible board. The thing is I've never owned a pair of Flow's before and I had a very hard time getting in n out of em. If I loosened the cord on the hi-back to get in easier it felt lose and like my heel was coming up. I'm not sure how to dial them in correctly, or how it should feel... anyone out there have any experience with Flow's, I'd like some help...
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Old 11-17-2010, 04:43 PM   #2 (permalink)
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This is a common problem with first time Flow users. They tend to over tighten the cap.

Flow bindings do not need to be as tight as traditional bindings. This will definitely have you feeling a little awkward at first if you are used to the tightness of traditional binders. Rest assured, you'll still get the response out of your bindings.

Another issue that people have is that they do not quite know how to kick in properly. This is something that is learned over repeated use. I'm to the point where I can actually crank it down pretty tight and be able to kick in and lock up.

Here's how I set up my Flows:

1) Place your empty boots into the loose bindings

2) Ratchet the cap down evenly on the heel end then ratchet down the toe end

3) Take the boots out and lock the inner ratchets on both the bindings

4) Step in and lace up my boots then kick in the bindings. I then tighten the outer ratchets and lock em.

If they still feel tight and hard to kick into, then release the outer ratchets by a step on the ladder.

When I am riding my Flows, I use a combination of kicking in and using the highback to push my boot in. I don't just try to completely kick it, using the highback to push your foot all the way forward is a good practice.

Remember, you have the newer generation Flows. You shouldn't have to loosen the cable if you are having trouble kicking in. Just release the outer ratchets and strap down like you would in traditional bindings.

Oh, forgot to say. Another reason people have trouble is because they cranked the heel side ratchets down too far. You can try just releasing those by a ladder step or two.
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Last edited by Leo; 11-17-2010 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 11-17-2010, 04:52 PM   #3 (permalink)
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thanks for the advice, I'm going to actually try and follow your steps exactly
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Old 11-17-2010, 07:51 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I used to have Flows; they were crappy compared to the current high-end Flow models, but I see that some of the basic difficulties remain. Here's another trick you might try if entry is difficult on the slopes and you don't feel like adjusting the straps (my son actually used this technique most of time): Kneel down and stick your boot into the binding as far as it will go (since the board's edge is digging into the snow, it can't slide while you're pushing with your foot), then reach back and raise and lock the highback. When you stand up, press down with your heel and your weight will cause the boot to squeeze down the last inch or so and pop into place securely. There's nothing subtle about this method, but it's fast and it works.
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Old 11-18-2010, 06:40 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeR View Post
I used to have Flows; they were crappy compared to the current high-end Flow models, but I see that some of the basic difficulties remain. Here's another trick you might try if entry is difficult on the slopes and you don't feel like adjusting the straps (my son actually used this technique most of time): Kneel down and stick your boot into the binding as far as it will go (since the board's edge is digging into the snow, it can't slide while you're pushing with your foot), then reach back and raise and lock the highback. When you stand up, press down with your heel and your weight will cause the boot to squeeze down the last inch or so and pop into place securely. There's nothing subtle about this method, but it's fast and it works.
I use method that goes along the same school of thought as this. I don't bend down on my knees, but do dig my toe edge in. This is part of the learned techniques that you pick up over time. I do this little shimmy thing that gets my boots in.

But most of all, like I said, using the highbacks to aid in pushing your boot forward helps. I noticed that a lot of my friends trying out my Flows try to completely kick in and don't even attempt to use the high back to help. They think they have to get the boot all the way in before lifting the high back.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:42 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Hi,

We have posted these instructions here before, but please give this a try:


The entry is a bit different than some users initially might think. These are the steps for first setup at home:

Set each of the 4 adjustment points to the very last tooth on the adjustment straps (largest position). Insert your foot (must be tightly laced in the boot-do not set up with a loosely laced boot). Position your foot so that the highback can clear the heel (but just clear it-as far back as possible). Use the ratchets, tightening the strap down to your boot. The binding is now ready to ride. When you go to kick in again, your boot will not get all the way in. It will be resting on the highback. That is correct. From this position, pull up on the high back, and stand down on your heel. The boot will "shoehorn" into place. As your boot will always be moist from snow when riding, this is very easy when riding, a bit harder when dry.
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Old 11-18-2010, 09:46 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I think flows come with instructions on how to properly dial them in. Also, im sure there are instructionals on youtube. I just learned the adjustment points, and kept playing with them until they were perfect and symmetrical. (im a little ocd about that ...which along with consistent tightness is one of the reasons why I got flows in the first place)...other than that though what was said above = , and youll learn the tricks of getting in and out. I used to have trouble but now i dont even have to stop when im gettin off the lift..I can just reach down and slide my back foot in while moving
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Old 11-18-2010, 09:52 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Just to pipe in here with one important aspect that has not been mentioned when setting up Flows. You must make sure that your boot is properly centered in the binding first and foremost. Take the power strap completely off and place the boot in the binding making sure the heel and toe overhang are the same, with the high back in position. The Highback should only make contact with the boot on the upper portion, there are instructions included with the Flows that illustrate this. For most users, no adjustment may be needed. I moved my high back back by about 1/2" though, on the NXT-SE this is very easy and does not require moving the steel cable, on my Teams I had to change position of the cable separately.

This is a very important step and should be verified before using the excellent advice above.

I rarely stop to step in, unless I am waiting for someone who doesn't use Flows. The biggest problem is keeping them free of snow so you occasionally have to give them a wipe with t he glove when riding in good conditions.

Last edited by jpb3; 11-18-2010 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 11-18-2010, 10:27 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
When you go to kick in again, your boot will not get all the way in. It will be resting on the highback. That is correct. From this position, pull up on the high back, and stand down on your heel. The boot will "shoehorn" into place. As your boot will always be moist from snow when riding, this is very easy when riding, a bit harder when dry.
The issue that I think beginners (or simply Flow novices) may have with entry is that the standard technique, which you have described, can be problematic on nonlevel ground. It's easy enough to put in the front foot down at the base of the hill, when you can anchor the board with the other foot. But kicking in the back foot will have to be done on unpredictable ground at the top of the hill, or perhaps in the middle of a slope if you had to stop and skate for some reason. Once you put your back foot into the binding, your anchor is gone and the board can start to slide downhill, perhaps rapidly. A beginner, or someone who's used to putting on strap bindings by sitting down, may find the "kick in on the fly" experience unnerving. The kneeling technique I suggested is the Flow equivalent of sitting down: you can do it on any slope, you don't need to dig a ditch, and you don't slide while doing it.
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