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-   -   Which bindings work well with a Never Summer SL? (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/bindings/49450-bindings-work-well-never-summer-sl.html)

onthefence 09-04-2012 03:44 AM

Which bindings work well with a Never Summer SL?
 
I'm thinking about picking up the Never Summer SL and know nothing about bindings except that they look A LOT more expensive than I had imagined.

Im a beginner who's just learned toe-side turns and only been on the mountain about 5 days. I plan to ride mainly freeride, and work my way up to some jumps. I don't plan to do rails or boxes anytime soon.

Which bindings should I look at? I'm not even sure what TYPE of bindings I would want, so any info about bindings in general would help.

Timberline 09-04-2012 10:15 AM

Id suggest getting a cheap pair if you can until you can develop more and know what style of riding you like so you can choose if you'd like more/less flex. Overall you should be looking to two types of bindings the normal type the you strap in and the flows which have the high backs that can collapse so you slide your foot in. Honestly aslong as you get a well built pair you can use them until your bombing steeps or starting to spin bigger than 3's in the park. Might also be a good idea to buy last seasons but that's just my 2c

snowklinger 09-04-2012 01:00 PM

yea get used ones cheap - try to find something of a major model/brand so you can compare and go from there.

Nivek 09-04-2012 01:58 PM

Last years K2 Formulas. That's probably the best binding/$$ out there.

Kapn.K 09-04-2012 02:45 PM

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onthefence 09-04-2012 08:45 PM

I'm trying to predict what bindings (soft/stiff) I'll want down the road so that I can just buy them now. I heard that softer bindings are more forgiving, and stiffer bindings are more responsive.

Also what are high-back bindings?

As a newer rider who's still learning I'm not sure which one of these I'd prefer. Does my decision depend on what kind of BOOTS i get?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nivek (Post 516534)
Last years K2 Formulas. That's probably the best binding/$$ out there.

Are these the 2011/2012's?

ThunderChunky 09-04-2012 09:26 PM

Not sure what high-back bindings are. High backs are the actual plate that comes off the back of the binding and supports the back of your calf. The piece that can fold down. That's the high back. There are only about two or so bindings out there now without them so I'd assume high-back bindings are just all bindings.

hktrdr 09-04-2012 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by onthefence (Post 516602)
I'm trying to predict what bindings (soft/stiff) I'll want down the road so that I can just buy them now. I heard that softer bindings are more forgiving, and stiffer bindings are more responsive.

Don't worry about it - the most important factors for bindings fit with your boot and comfort (these are normally related). Aspects like flex/responsiveness, weight, dampening, canting, etc. are all way secondary and not worth thinking about this stage.

Until you have got more than 50-100 days on the mountain, the old mantra about gear selection applies:
  1. Buy boots that fit. This is the single most important factor in improving your boarding and enjoying riding. Do not worry about brand (as long as it is one of the major brands it will be fine), stiffness, tech, reviews, etc. - just get something that fits.
  2. Get (buy/borrow/rent) a board that is approximately correct for your weight+ height (and maybe foot size) and intended riding style (if you know) - for most people a soft-medium flex all-mountain will do the trick. Do not worry about brand, stiffness, tech, reviews, etc.
  3. Get bindings that fit your boots and are comfortable. Did I mention: Do not worry about brand, stiffness, tech, reviews, etc.
  4. Then ride as much as you can/enjoy. Maybe take lessons. Any day of riding (heck every single run) will make more of a difference to your riding and progression than any gear choice.

Quote:

Originally Posted by onthefence (Post 516602)
Also what are high-back bindings?

See ThunderChucky's post.

Quote:

Originally Posted by onthefence (Post 516602)
As a newer rider who's still learning I'm not sure which one of these I'd prefer. Does my decision depend on what kind of BOOTS i get?

Only to the extent that the bindings should fit your boots and not cause any pressure points.

Quote:

Originally Posted by onthefence (Post 516602)
Are these the 2011/2012's?

Does not matter.

onthefence 09-04-2012 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hktrdr (Post 516616)
Do not worry about brand (as long as it is one of the major brands it will be fine)

Since only fit matters, I feel like I should be able to get away with something far less expensive than a major brand. Or is a major brand a MUST because of the quality? I'm asking this in reference to both boots and bindings.

linvillegorge 09-04-2012 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hktrdr (Post 516616)
Don't worry about it - the most important factors for bindings fit with your boot and comfort (these are normally related). Aspects like flex/responsiveness, weight, dampening, canting, etc. are all way secondary and not worth thinking about this stage.

Until you have got more than 50-100 days on the mountain, the old mantra about gear selection applies:
  1. Buy boots that fit. This is the single most important factor in improving your boarding and enjoying riding. Do not worry about brand (as long as it is one of the major brands it will be fine), stiffness, tech, reviews, etc. - just get something that fits.
  2. Get (buy/borrow/rent) a board that is approximately correct for your weight+ height (and maybe foot size) and intended riding style (if you know) - for most people a soft-medium flex all-mountain will do the trick. Do not worry about brand, stiffness, tech, reviews, etc.
  3. Get bindings that fit your boots and are comfortable. Did I mention: Do not worry about brand, stiffness, tech, reviews, etc.
  4. Then ride as much as you can/enjoy. Maybe take lessons. Any day of riding (heck every single run) will make more of a difference to your riding and progression than any gear choice.


See ThunderChucky's post.


Only to the extent that the bindings should fit your boots and not cause any pressure points.


Does not matter.

I can't fully subscribe to this theory. I think most beginners are best suited with boards and bindings a bit on the softer side. They're just more forgiving generally. The last thing you want to do is a put a beginner on a poorly matched board/binding combo. IMO, the worst is a soft park board with a stiff freeride binding. Holy shit, that's an awful combo. I couldn't imagine the struggles a beginner would have with a setup like that. You wiggle your toes and that board is dancing around.


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