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-   -   What does stance really do? (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/bindings/63705-what-does-stance-really-do.html)

Consonantal 02-08-2013 07:04 PM

What does stance really do?
 
I'm currently riding slightly duck, 10/-10, I like to carve down blues and occasionally hit blacks if the weather and snow is nice.

But recently I've been hitting the terrain park, practicing boxes, rails, and small kickers.

So what does stance really do? What does a really angled stance do compared to a 0/0? More importantly, what's recommended for me?

baconzoo 02-08-2013 07:31 PM

Everybody is different and the best way is to keep trying different stances. Your body will tell you what works best for you. I ride 30/15 with maxed forward lean... :blink:

Cyfer 02-08-2013 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by baconzoo (Post 700257)
Everybody is different and the best way is to keep trying different stances. Your body will tell you what works best for you. I ride 30/15 with maxed forward lean... :blink:

Have to agree here, your stance is all about what works for you. I currently ride 12 front -12 on the back with a 23 inch wide stance. I've tried 15 but its too much on my knees, anything wider doesn't work either. It's all about comfort in my eyes. What works is what you use.

poutanen 02-08-2013 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Consonantal (Post 700177)
So what does stance really do?

It allows you to dynamically bend and rotate and an improper stance can wreak havoc on your knees.

That said there's not WRONG stance. As long as you generally keep with angle different somewhere between 15 and 30 degrees or so. Many of us that started in the early 90's rode with 0 degrees on the back foot and about 25 on the front. Carvers use forward stances upwards of 60 degrees.

I have slowly moved to symmetrical duck (-9 +9 or so) and my GF seems happy at the same setting, but everyone has to find their own stance.

The important things to think about when changing stance are:

1) change one thing at a time, don't change angle and width at the same time or you won't know what worked and what didn't

2) Reference stance width is a good starting place

3) for a noob, a relatively neutral stance is a good starting place, something like -6 on the back foot, and +15 on the front

4) Try a stance for a few runs then change again, if you try multiple stances in one day you'll learn more than trying a new stance each day. Snow conditions and body conditions change from day to day.

pdxrealtor 02-09-2013 07:46 PM

I've messed with stance since day 1, last year!

I tried a multitude of different stances last year before I settled at a 18/3 with a 21.5 width.

This year I thought I'd go back to a 15/15 stance (same width) in an effort to correct my sometimes faulty body position that a 18/3 can promote. It felt OK, but after 3 days on the mountain I realized I was falling more and once again my back leg quad was burning out per-maturely. Also, I could no longer strap in standing up.... not a big deal but just another indicator that my stance of 15/15 was not for me

Since then I've gone back to my 18/3 stance, at a 21.5 width, and I do so much better. I do have to pay attention to my technique but that's more of an adjustment thing in my riding style vs. trying to adjust my riding style for my stance.

It's amazing how a little bit of tweaking in binding angles can have such an effect on some people.

Now that I'm back at what works best for my natural stance I've been able to focus more on actual riding technique vs. having to focus on why I'm falling on the simple runs I'd normally not fall on. I can also, at will, strap in standing up.

While a few degrees one way or the other seems like it shouldn't matter, In my experience it does. Sure I could learn to override my body's natural stance but why when I could work on the minor technique problem that arises out of putting my stance at the point that serves me best??????????????

wernersl 02-10-2013 12:47 PM

Back when I started, I started as poutanen described. Simple symmetrical stance. As I progressed I found I was most comfortable with my front foot at a more aggressive angle. Still something was off. I was uncomfortable at speed and had a hard time laying down decent carves. Last season I finally decided to try positive angles for both feet. I now ride +21/+9 and couldnt be more comfortable. Now I dont ride switch unless my life depends on it and I could care less about the park. I ride for speed and love laying down deep carves on those early morning groomers. It also greatly improved my powder riding. As everyone here said...all personal preference. Just listen to your body. Your legs will tell you if something is off.

jdang307 02-11-2013 12:39 AM

I rode 15/15 last year on twins, even though I don't ride switch much (I'm trying).

Changed it to 18/12 and it was weird. Went back to 15/15 and am more comfortable. It really is weird. Small changes have significant effects.

neshawnp 02-11-2013 12:07 PM

+- 12 w ref stance status. On a 159w est Burton. 6'1"

poutanen 02-11-2013 12:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wernersl (Post 705714)
Last season I finally decided to try positive angles for both feet. I now ride +21/+9 and couldnt be more comfortable. Now I dont ride switch unless my life depends on it and I could care less about the park. I ride for speed and love laying down deep carves on those early morning groomers.

Yeah and there's nothing wrong with this either. 99.9% to 100% of racers use forward stances (might be the odd pro-bx rider that doesn't I dunno)... A lot of big mountain riders like Terje Haakonsen uses something close to your stance.

There's no such thing as a wrong stance!

djmisio85 02-11-2013 09:06 PM

I have been snowboarding for about 14 years, so take this as you will. However...

In general, having your feet pointing somewhat in the direction in which you are going, will make it easier for you to go in that direction, especially your front foot. Taking this example to extremes, if you had both your feet parallel next to each other facing forwards, (coming from skiing), it would be very easy to make turns. Many people say skiing has no relation to snowboarding... but they both have two edges, so the concept of using the edge and shifting your body weight to initiate a turn is the same.

For this reason, if we take a duck stance, your front foot can be either left or right, and it makes it easier to progress or land in the direction your feet are pointing.

I personally ride +17/ -9, because I usually ride normally, therefore having a bias on my regular front foot, but I occasionally ride switch, so having my back foot at -9 helps me then especially with landings.

Since you ask, compared to a 0/0 stance... I think a 0/0 stance would be the easiest to catch an edge on during normal riding. And maybe not so good for the knees in respect to lateral side to side movement. ( I have a bad knee, so maybe me more than others)

But as most people will tell you, stance is a personal preference. In general, if you don't ride switch, have both your feet facing foward. If you do ride switch have your back foot at at least 0 or anywhere minus from that (but not more than your other foot)


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