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Old 01-02-2009, 08:50 PM   #1 (permalink)
K9popo
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Default Help a Father OUT!!!

Okay im sure you guys have heard this before and I have searched and learned a ton off of the forum...

My 12 year old son wants to start snowboarding and me being the father that wants to give his kids the best of everything but on a somewhat limited budget...So im going to hit the end of season sales and I want to put it away until the 09/2010 season so I can get my moneys worth...Im going to get him some never ever lessons and a season pass to Park City plus all the equipment and to do all that at once would literally put me in the even more poor house...BTW my 6 year old will be starting at the same time...

My questions are:
My son is 5' tall and weighs 105lbs, can I buy a board that he will still get maybe 2 seasons out of 9 months early???I really like the reviews of the Never Summer and want to pick him up a EVO 143...

I figured his feet would grow between then so I would wait on bindings and boots...

If this makes any sense I appreciate guidance...

Thanks,
K9
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Old 01-02-2009, 09:45 PM   #2 (permalink)
Psyre
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For sizing I find this helps, it also suggests boards.

Snowboard Sizing Guide, Size Calculator

Last seasons gear isn't a bad buy, you can get great deals on new gear that performs just as well.

Last edited by Psyre; 01-02-2009 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:21 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Sessions over, cops are here! J/K

The board should be in the 140's I would go in the mid 40's to be sure hes on it for two seasons. You can go ahead and get the bindings for it as well most come in sizes that cover a broad range and can be adjusted to meet his growing needs. Probably good to hold off on the boots till right before the season and get them a bit big for the growing that may occur.
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:45 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by In search for I View Post
Sessions over, cops are here! J/K

The board should be in the 140's I would go in the mid 40's to be sure hes on it for two seasons. You can go ahead and get the bindings for it as well most come in sizes that cover a broad range and can be adjusted to meet his growing needs. Probably good to hold off on the boots till right before the season and get them a bit big for the growing that may occur.
A kid learning to snowboard does not need heel lift, that is making turn initiation harder and more sloppier. Boots should always be the correct fit. Yeah, it sucks that one would have to buy a pair nearly every season for a while. It's not like when I was a kid; the selection has increased tenfold. There's cheaper quality alternatives.
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Old 01-02-2009, 11:12 PM   #5 (permalink)
powderjet81
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Default Snowboard sizing

The best way to find the right size board is to look at the manufacturers recommended weight range. This will be printed on the boards themselves, on the manufacturers websites and on most online retailers. They put a lot of effort into designing them that way. A huge myth is that height is the most important factor, its just a minor one.

Weight is the most important factor in deciding snowboard size. I would suggest that when you find a board you want to buy, find the size that recommends your son's weight closest to the middle of the range. you could go for a board where he is on the lower end of the weight range so that he will grow into it.

However just consider that the longer and stiffer a board is, the harder it is to turn on, the less forgiving it is; and therefore the harder it will be to learn on. So don't get anything too big. Dont worry about him outgrowing a board too much, lots of people ride on small boards for their weight.

However make sure boots are the right size. You should cheat on that.

On another note, be careful with your 6yo starting snowboarding at that age. I am an instructor and know that kids at that age have very little limb control. Coordination starts at the core and moves outwards with age. 7 1/2 - 8 yrs is when most kids have enough limb control to learn snowboarding well.

In saying that i do not disencourage you starting your 6yo. Lots of kids start really young. But keep in mind that what he can do will be very limited.
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Old 01-03-2009, 04:31 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy Max View Post
A kid learning to snowboard does not need heel lift, that is making turn initiation harder and more sloppier. Boots should always be the correct fit. Yeah, it sucks that one would have to buy a pair nearly every season for a while. It's not like when I was a kid; the selection has increased tenfold. There's cheaper quality alternatives.
I guess if you are a spoiled brat YOU might get perfect fitting boots whenever you needed them. I started snowboarding 17 years ago in Sorels and a hand me down Burton Air I still managed to learn to ride.Getting boots acouple sizes too big wont be a problem. There are many things you can do to make up the room in the boots like extra socks, you can also buy external heel anchors if it is a problem. You seemed to forget that snowboarding gear has evolved to its present form and people learned with Ill fitting gear and gear that wasnt even designed for snowboarding and they still shred. When it comes to gear some peoples advice makes it sound like boarding is some kind of Jedi martial art that can olny be mastered with high end equipment. In fact its the complete opposite you can learn on a piece of of wood you shaped in your basement with hiking boots and a couple leather straps to hold you feet to it.
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:46 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by In search for I View Post
Sessions over, cops are here! J/K

The board should be in the 140's I would go in the mid 40's to be sure hes on it for two seasons. You can go ahead and get the bindings for it as well most come in sizes that cover a broad range and can be adjusted to meet his growing needs. Probably good to hold off on the boots till right before the season and get them a bit big for the growing that may occur.
HIDE THE WEED...

Now pass me a Coors light

Thanks for the info...Do you think a 143 would last a couple and does he need a youth board???I was shooting for the youth side of things because I figured they would be a little more flexible and easier to ride...



Quote:
Originally Posted by powderjet81 View Post
The best way to find the right size board is to look at the manufacturers recommended weight range. This will be printed on the boards themselves, on the manufacturers websites and on most online retailers. They put a lot of effort into designing them that way. A huge myth is that height is the most important factor, its just a minor one.

Weight is the most important factor in deciding snowboard size. I would suggest that when you find a board you want to buy, find the size that recommends your son's weight closest to the middle of the range. you could go for a board where he is on the lower end of the weight range so that he will grow into it.

However just consider that the longer and stiffer a board is, the harder it is to turn on, the less forgiving it is; and therefore the harder it will be to learn on. So don't get anything too big. Dont worry about him outgrowing a board too much, lots of people ride on small boards for their weight.

However make sure boots are the right size. You should cheat on that.

On another note, be careful with your 6yo starting snowboarding at that age. I am an instructor and know that kids at that age have very little limb control. Coordination starts at the core and moves outwards with age. 7 1/2 - 8 yrs is when most kids have enough limb control to learn snowboarding well.

In saying that i do not disencourage you starting your 6yo. Lots of kids start really young. But keep in mind that what he can do will be very limited.
I have been looking on never summers website and cannot find a weight chart for any of their boards...I really like the EVO 143...I will search other manufacturers as well to get an idea of where they're at...

Also any idea on binding size ie youth med vs. mens small etc.?

He is a BIG 6yo...I figured he was a little young but if big brother can do it...
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:05 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K9popo View Post
Also any idea on binding size ie youth med vs. mens small etc.?
There are almost always binding size charts on manufacturers' or retailers' websites (it's different for each manufacturer and binding).
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:27 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Youth bindings usually blow; get Men's S or S/M.
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:54 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by In search for I View Post
I guess if you are a spoiled brat YOU might get perfect fitting boots whenever you needed them. I started snowboarding 17 years ago in Sorels and a hand me down Burton Air I still managed to learn to ride.Getting boots acouple sizes too big wont be a problem. There are many things you can do to make up the room in the boots like extra socks, you can also buy external heel anchors if it is a problem. You seemed to forget that snowboarding gear has evolved to its present form and people learned with Ill fitting gear and gear that wasnt even designed for snowboarding and they still shred. When it comes to gear some peoples advice makes it sound like boarding is some kind of Jedi martial art that can olny be mastered with high end equipment. In fact its the complete opposite you can learn on a piece of of wood you shaped in your basement with hiking boots and a couple leather straps to hold you feet to it.
I've paid for all of my gear. When I was a kid, it was financed through a paper route.
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