So I'm Thinking about starting a low-key snowboard company - Page 3 - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:29 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeenirvana View Post
Starting a company during a recession, crazy! Getting told no from everyone, painful! Chasing after your dreams, PRICELESS............
HAHA, very nice line. Actually, statistics showed people trailed off in skiing last year, but snowboarding was up, even though it was the warmest winter I believe in history they said? Coming from a racing background, snowboarding is cheap, very cheap. Can't compare it to a competitive level in anything serious racing related with the money you burn left and right. I compare it to racing since in any given time the same people within a selective group have tried it alike to the same amount that have tried snowboarding.

You pay around at your peak of skill 6-700 for a board avg, 200 avg for bindings, 200 for boots, wearing the same clothes for 3 years or more till they wear out and the same board depending on your style will last you avg a year or less if you're a pro, and longer if you're just into it. The majority of people will use a board 2-3 years, you don't need a new board every year unless you're a pro or seriously treating it like a profession thrashing the board all year long. In other words, it's a cheap alternative for an active sport with adrenaline rush contrast to most of the rest out there and still has people getting on it every year recession or not. So when they say there is less of the pie available for other low end companies to get in on it, I'd have to say that pie is mainly the average boarder population.

Most companies do not pitch to only pros or only beginners, but the average boarder and then market it to say it's great for beginning or for pro riding. The population is not dwindling, no one I've ever heard of gets out of boarding because of cost. However, they will cut down on their expense like buying a top of the line board or any other gear and instead go for a well rep'd company or established middle of the line board or gear. This is where having a good board and props from customers to recommend you will come into place. Customer satisfaction and service is everything. If you can get local support and have a good product, for the majority of the population of average riders, top name brands cannot compete with this unless they have a local store because you are there for servicing and support whereas they are not and resort to mass advertising, marketing, and online sales.
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Last edited by Vlaze; 01-11-2009 at 09:37 AM.
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:32 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Just starting up a company seems like it would be an incredible task to over come, but I think if you could do like someone said and start a store of some sort then that could slowly ease you into the "biz". Find a sweet location, try to get some ins with local riders and sponsor a team, offer good deals on hot waxes and tuning and fixing core shots, basically try to make it a place that people want to stop at before they hit the mountain. After you have a good relationship with the reps from the companies you buy from, then you can maybe get your foot into producing, but I think there's just too much to jump into making snowboards.

Then again, don't listen to anyone who tells you that you can't do something. Start a company, name it "Eff you Tom" and when someone asks you why you named your company that, you tell em that was the name of the first person that told me I was crazy for starting this line.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:06 AM   #23 (permalink)
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If you have the balls to write this post I assume you are an experienced snowboard maker. I also assume that you have built some boards which your close circle of friends have given you positive feedback on your designs.
If that is the case... and you know what happens when you assume...(lol) then, you have some thing besides a dream to start a company.

I suggest you take these first boards to you local shop, leave them on "consignment" so they do not have to invest in your product during these terrible economic times.
If they sell, you have something!
Keep doing that until you gather capital and then go to more shops, build a sales team and the rest will not be easy... but you are on your way to your dream!

I am in retail and HATE IT!
Buying something from vendors that control the market and reselling it for what they tell you sucks!
Take it from me, I have been in retail for 17 years and hate every moment of it.
I am working for someone else... the vendors! If you have your own brand, you are working for your self, for your dream! Keep dreaming bro and good luck!
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:10 AM   #24 (permalink)
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I got an idea, everyone from a certain background from the forum get together and make a brand. We're all the prezidanz, v Pee's , and C-E-yos. Seems we have people from retail, engineering, accounting some, and experienced boarders here and likely more that haven't replied. We'll call the brand, Fo-Sho! ^_^
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:46 AM   #25 (permalink)
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I would heed MonekySpunk's advice. This is a very complex subject that requires a lot of research in the disciplines of both science and business. let's not forget, the most brilliant ideas one could imagine are doomed to immediate failure if they cannot be communicated/understood by the proper audience. You need to create a valid business model with a solid marketing strategy that applies to current trends/market conditions. You also need to think at least 5 years ahead of yourself.
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Old 01-12-2009, 12:06 AM   #26 (permalink)
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To everyone who replied to this thread, thank you, all positive and negative criticism is much needed. I know I'm head over heels in this "project" of mine, and I know it's gonna take more than a post on a small online forum to get this up and running, if it ever will.
All comments will be taken into mind. And for those who are telling me to think of more than a name, I realize that, as odd as it may seem with a post like this, I'm not stupid, but I could use all ideas given to me.
Short post for now, longer one coming soon with a multi-quote, thanks again guys.
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Old 01-12-2009, 01:05 AM   #27 (permalink)
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dixon cider!

say it outloud several times, you'll get it.
what does this have to do with snowboarding... absolutely nothing but neither does flow, forum, rome, gnu, solomon.... you get the point
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Old 01-24-2009, 12:08 AM   #28 (permalink)
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give us an update man! or give me a job lol

the best snowboarding brand name logo thing Ive thought up is

SIL - snowboarding is life

would be a cool small shop name to.
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Old 01-24-2009, 03:44 AM   #29 (permalink)
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"Lowa snowboards" then you can get Lowa to make you your snowboarding boots

It would be hard to start a snowboard line these days with so many options to choose from in the market breaking is going to be a life devotion which will mean earning little or no money and gaining debt fairly steeply. Usually these days if you can last the 2-3 years on your business you've made a "success". Because **** most of em fail in the first year.

As i've been running a boot business in NZ it was a struggle getting the name out needed to lots of promos hell i even had to win a few rock climbing comps to get the word out. Now making a solid earnings of $400 a week doing nothing not bad for a kid .

P.s this advice is from a 16 year old you've been warned don't be stupid and follow any instructions posted in here abiding by this you shall SURVIVE!
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Old 01-24-2009, 12:16 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Unless you have something new to offer, there is really no good way to jump into this business. People only buy two kinds of boards: price point boards and name brand.

No one will pay top dollar for a brand that isn't putting seriously high quality boards out there. Unless you can compete with NeverSummer, Rome, Burton, etc., you won't move in on their business. Plus the fact that you're not a well-known boarder establishing his own company. A big-name boarder is almost a requirement nowadays.

So I can only assume you would be making price point boards. The problem here is that small companies usually have to spend a lot more money to compete with the bigger companies. Your product may be at the same level as Lamar or 5150, but they can churn out more boards for less.

Business is hard enough to break into when something is already established, but you're talking about a fairly small milieu.

Maybe you should consider starting a board shop that sells other brands and does repairs. After becoming established, maybe sponsor some local boarders. After that, you could consider building boards. I think it would be extremely foolhardy to just start building snowboards. People who start new car companies typically worked on cars and built them for the major companies for years, or even decades, before starting their own venture. And even then, if they didn't bring something new to the table, they went under.

So, while ambition is always a good thing, you have to be practical. There is a lot more to a snowboard manufacturer than a cool name.
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