Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums

Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/forum.php)
-   Boards (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/)
-   -   Recommendations for Cold wax (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/123889-recommendations-cold-wax.html)

Caffeine 01-30-2014 03:31 PM

Recommendations for Cold wax
 
Hey guys


I am curious to know what you guys use for really cold temperatures like -30 degrees Celsius. I have used Dakine cold wax but my board is still real slow in minus 25 and under. Is there a wax that will give me some decent glide in cold weather like this (I was thinking Swix LH4 rated down to minus -32 or Beaver cold wax) or will a board be slow no matter what in conditions like these?

Cheers.

poutanen 01-30-2014 03:44 PM

There are a few days a year where it's pretty much impossible to glide across the top because it's so cold. Any good cold temp wax can help, but nothing can help the fact that the snow is bloody cold! Just like nothing can overcome the bad suction you get with spring boarding.

One thing that might help is a good base structure. Have you had a base grind lately?

Caffeine 01-30-2014 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poutanen (Post 1488001)
There are a few days a year where it's pretty much impossible to glide across the top because it's so cold. Any good cold temp wax can help, but nothing can help the fact that the snow is bloody cold! Just like nothing can overcome the bad suction you get with spring boarding.

One thing that might help is a good base structure. Have you had a base grind lately?

No I have never had a base grind.....isn't that something you get when your base is really dinged up?

poutanen 01-30-2014 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caffeine (Post 1488009)
No I have never had a base grind.....isn't that something you get when your base is really dinged up?

Yes and no, if the structure is gone, or there wasn't a good structure to begin with, a base grind can really help with glide in spring slush. Not sure if it has any effect on really cold snow.

Here's a site with some comments about it. Not sure how accurate they are.

Ski Base Structure Theory

Bones 01-30-2014 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poutanen (Post 1488017)
Yes and no, if the structure is gone, or there wasn't a good structure to begin with, a base grind can really help with glide in spring slush. Not sure if it has any effect on really cold snow.

A base grind and structure is really going to help break the suction effect in spring conditions. There may well be some advantage in very cold conditions, but my understanding is that there isn't or that the advantage wouldn't be noticeable.

Your best bet is cold temperature wax, but there is a temperature point where the advantages should be described as "beats doing nothing"

KIRKRIDER 01-30-2014 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bones (Post 1488145)
A base grind and structure is really going to help break the suction effect in spring conditions. There may well be some advantage in very cold conditions, but my understanding is that there isn't or that the advantage wouldn't be noticeable.

Your best bet is cold temperature wax, but there is a temperature point where the advantages should be described as "beats doing nothing"

same thing happened to me. was like riding velcro. Try Zardoz not wax?

Bones 01-30-2014 05:06 PM

The following is from tognar

Waxing tips for ski and snowboard


COLD SNOW = SLOWER GLIDE
Cold slow is usually dry snow...in fact, somewhere around -20*F (-30*C), snow feels more like beach sand and bases are really slow...whether correctly waxed or not. Warmer temperatures usually create more moisture in the snowpack, which provides greater lubricity and helps the base slide...up to a point, since too much water creates suction that again slows your glide. Ideal glide usually occurs at temperatures just below freezing (28 to 30*F, or -2 to -1*C...depending on the moisture content). Tests conducted by the Ski Research Group at Eagle River Nordic in Wisconsin (using nordic skis gliding downhill through a speed trap on a 12* slope) produced the following results:
Snow Temp Glide Speed % Difference
28*F 18mph --
20*F 17mph 5% slower
10*F 15mph 11% slower
-4*F 12mph 33% slower
-10*F 8mph 56% slower

There is also a chart listing temperature ranges by some of the major wax companies. Obviously, not all wax companies and the info is a bit dated, but there are very few waxes that go below -30F

24WERD 01-30-2014 07:46 PM

I usually just use hertel FC739 and buy the cold snap mix 50/50 wax and go.

Of course I have not been in under 10f yet and I would be glad to see actual powder this year.

tanscrazydaisy 01-30-2014 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caffeine (Post 1487953)
Hey guys


I am curious to know what you guys use for really cold temperatures like -30 degrees Celsius. I have used Dakine cold wax but my board is still real slow in minus 25 and under. Is there a wax that will give me some decent glide in cold weather like this (I was thinking Swix LH4 rated down to minus -32 or Beaver cold wax) or will a board be slow no matter what in conditions like these?

Cheers.

You mean CH4? or LF4 (low fluoro).... they will be good to about -32C

if that's what is available locally and/or what you have on hand... then use it.

hpin 01-31-2014 02:11 AM

I use the Maplus Green wax during typical Jan-Feb Alberta weather.
https://tools4boards.com/store/produ...tegory_id-null

I got them from the shop in Calgary.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:08 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2