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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 07:18 PM
chams
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First Snowboard.....Maintence?

Hey guys. This is my first season snowboarding and I am really liking it.

I just bought my first board this afternoon. Its a Forum Recon All Mountain.

What kind of maintenance should I be doing/getting done. It seems like a nice board, I'd like to keep it that way.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 07:25 PM
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First off is a fresh hot wax to the board, maybe even two coats of wax to make sure the base is good and saturated. Then since your just starting out it would be wise of you to tune your edges a bit, with a base bevel of at least 1 degree if not 2 degrees to make the board "less grabby" so you won't be constantly catching edges and breaking yourself . Also you'll want to have your board hot waxed (either yourself or professional) at least every few times you ride, if not after every time depending on how harsh the conditions your riding are.
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 07:25 PM
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Hey Chams... congrats on your new board. One good thing about the Recon is that it needs very little maintenance. Unlike sintered bases on higher end boards, the extruded base on the Recon does not need to be consistently waxed. Technically it doesn't ever have to be waxed. That doesn't mean that you can't... it just isn't mandatory. If you do choose to wax this board, all you will need is a machine wax (an iron wax will cost more and will not give any more advantage on this type of base). A few small things you can do to keep your board in prime shape is to check for and remove rust on the edges, and keep it in a bag as much as possible. You will probably want to get your edges sharpened and base structured once or twice a season (depending on how much you are riding), but other than that just repair your damages as early as possible and have fun.

Last edited by Sierracrew; 02-02-2009 at 07:36 PM.
post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 07:27 PM
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Since nobody mentioned it, make sure you wipe down your board when you get home so the edges dont have standing water on them and rust.

'09 151 Never Summer SL-R
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 09:46 PM
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Thanks for the replies everyone.

The shop said they would have my board ready for my on Thursday, so I am assuming they are going to wax it along with attaching the bindings. I suppose I'll get it waxed again at the end of the season.

About the rust, how do I remove it if it starts to form?

Thanks again for the replies, I really appreciate the help.
post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 10:17 PM
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Rust will come off as you ride, but you can take one of the soft gummy stones to it if you really care to wipe them off.

Do NOT use chemicals to remove the rust...

Also if your getting the bindings attached by them you should make sure you strap in while your there to make sure its a comfortable stance. As a general rule most people like their stance to be about shoulder width.

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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 10:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierracrew View Post
Hey Chams... congrats on your new board. One good thing about the Recon is that it needs very little maintenance. Unlike sintered bases on higher end boards, the extruded base on the Recon does not need to be consistently waxed. Technically it doesn't ever have to be waxed. That doesn't mean that you can't... it just isn't mandatory. If you do choose to wax this board, all you will need is a machine wax (an iron wax will cost more and will not give any more advantage on this type of base). A few small things you can do to keep your board in prime shape is to check for and remove rust on the edges, and keep it in a bag as much as possible. You will probably want to get your edges sharpened and base structured once or twice a season (depending on how much you are riding), but other than that just repair your damages as early as possible and have fun.
Dude i have an extruded core and it gets scratches and dings all the time. Its a ride ruckus and i dont even ride on hard crap
post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierracrew View Post
Unlike sintered bases on higher end boards, the extruded base on the Recon does not need to be consistently waxed. Technically it doesn't ever have to be waxed.

What?

All boards need wax.

A sintered base will hold more wax due to all the pores, etc., but an extruded base needs wax as well.

If you don't wax, the base will oxidize and get slower and more prone to friction damage like edge burn. The oxidation will also prevent the base from absorbing wax, so the situation becomes a double edged sword. When you get to that point only a base grind to remove the oxidized base will work. Of course, you have less base remaining after that.

An extruded base is smoother than a sintered base (and cheaper to produce) and absorbs less wax than a sintered base. Wax sits more on the surface than in the pores (cuz there's fewer pores) and comes off much quicker.

If anything, an extruded base should be waxed more often than a sintered base, but is somewhat more forgiving to a lack of wax because it has less exposed surface area to oxidize.

Technically, all bases need to be waxed consistently.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 10:00 AM
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abrasion, not oxidation

THERE ARE SPECIFIC REASONS AS TO WHY I AM MORE LOCAL THAN YOU

GOD IS DONUT
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by legallyillegal View Post
abrasion, not oxidation
Admittedly, not my best attempt at an explanation, but I think we're thinking the same thing. More oxidation = less wax rentention. Less wax = more abrasion. More abrasion = more heat. More heat = more oxidation. It's a vicious circle.

FYI, here's a decent source for the technical stuff explained for the layman:

Ski and Boarder Matrix - Snowboard Science
Quote:
Oxidised P-Tex means burnt P-Tex, and is obviously very bad news. It is mostly caused by the base running dry, where there is no wax reserves to lubricate the surface in contact with the snow. The surface temperature builds up from friction, and the surface of the P-Tex oxidises leaving a white colouring (most noticable on dark-coloured bases). You will see this on many dry slope rental boards. The reason oxidation is so bad is because it seals the pores in the surface of the P-Tex, which prevents wax getting deep into the base. Hence why regular waxing is important to maintain your snowboard.
Oxidation can be removed, leaving good P-Tex underneath and ready for effective waxing. This needs to be carried out by a professional using stone-grinding equipment. Prevention is better than cure - if you have to keep grinding your base, soon there won't be anything left!

Last edited by Bones; 02-03-2009 at 10:36 AM.
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