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Old 02-28-2014, 10:02 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Help with board selection - yep, another one!

Guys, I'm just looking for some feedback here.

5'-9", 200 lbs., size 10 stompers

Total newbie....never stepped on a board.

All mountain, powder over parks, and speed but always stay within my limits.

I'm looking at an intermediate to advanced board that I can learn on and grow into......stability with little to now chatter, etc.

I am going to take lessons and will definitely try on and fit boots before buying.

No brand preference....reasonable budget for quality gear....etc.

Final thoughts....I've heard the first few days are rough but once things click progression comes fairly quickly. Camber, Hybrid, Rocker....thinking Camber for sharper turns and stability....I really don't want something thats real loose....

Could use some feedback on my board thoughts, particularly regarding camber vs. some of the hybrid decks....heck who am I kidding, I'm really wanting you guys to tell me what how you'd approach starting if you had it to do over and what equipment you'd get today.

Thanks for any advice....yeah, Crash will be wearing a crash bucket!
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Old 02-28-2014, 10:16 PM   #2 (permalink)
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If you have never ridden before, then none of the nuances make a lick of difference as your learning will have no comparison. Equipment makes very very little difference your first 20-50 days, while lessons, practice and technique will make every difference in progression and fun. Also nice gogs, comfortable feet and cozy clothing help.

How many days a year will u ride? Where?

Do you know how to skateboard or surf? Comfort standing sideways helps.

Forget all the camber talk.

Just buy something with a medium flex, stiff boards are a little harder to learn on, and if you buy a noodle it will be easier to learn but you will be pissed that you have a noodle once you do. You want 158-162 cm, a nice 2 inch range, you can go a little bigger or smaller, again not very important when learning.

Bindings: Burton Cartel, k2 company, salomon chief (these 3 bindings have been top all-mountains for their respective companies for years)

Or ignore everything I say and be like the guy who asked all these questions and then bought a Never Summer Raptor (AK board basically) for Michigan.
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Last edited by snowklinger; 02-28-2014 at 11:03 PM.
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Old 02-28-2014, 10:36 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
If you have never ridden before, then none of the nuances make a lick of difference as your learning will have no comparison. Equipment makes very very little difference your first 20-50 days, while lessons, practice and technique will make every difference in progression and fun. Also nice gogs, comfortable feet and cozy clothing help.

How many days a year will u ride? Where?

Do you know how to skateboard or surf? Comfort standing sideways helps.

Forget all the camber talk.

Just buy something with a medium flex, stiff boards are a little harder to learn on, and if you buy a noodle it will be easier to learn but you will be pissed that you have a noodle one you do. You want 158-162 cm, a nice 2 inch range, you can go a little bigger or smaller, again not very important when learning.

Bindings: Burton Cartel, k2 company, salomon chief (these 3 bindings have been top all-mountains for their respective companies for years)

Or ignore everything I say and be like the guy who asked all these questions and then bought a Never Summer Raptor (AK board basically) for Michigan.

Thanks Snowklinger....Never surfed but had several skateboards years ago...comfortable standing sideways so all is good!

Where - Colorado...a few trips each year....most would rent, but I've decided to make the commitment and buy some decent gear. I seldom halfstep!
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Old 02-28-2014, 11:08 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Lots and lots of boards discussed in this forum right in this wheelhouse.
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:13 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Read your welcome intro also. Welcome. For your very first lesson(s)? I would highly recommend you rent. You may well be a natural athlete or something and supremely confident in your ability to "pick this up!" But until you actually do some slippin' and sliding you really can't be sure how you will do or if you will be bitten by the bug.

If, like me, after your lesson(s) you discover you don't totally suck at this? (...started @ 50 yo and I was seriously addicted from day one despite nearly breaking my hip!)

...You can always run out afterwards and put a hurting on your credit cards. That's exactly what I did after my second trip to the local bunny hill.

Btw, I learned to ride on a long, stiff assed, full camber, big mountain board on MI. bunny hills! No, not the NS Raptor. I do believe it forced me to learn better riding/turning techniques and helped in my basics progression once things clicked. But it was definitely not a "forgiving" or noob friendly board to learn on. I took a fair number of hard slams before and after getting fairly competent with the basics. Not everyone will/would push thru all that pain n punishment to get this down.

The veteran riders here have lots of experience and good info to pass along. See how you feel, how you do, after your first couple times out. If you get hooked? Good Luck!
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:40 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Hey Thanks for the response Chomps....I'm not quite 50 YO but its not that too far off. I've actually been wanting to try boarding for awhile. I'm also pretty stubborn and don't give up on things, and yeah, I'd consider myself athletic. Given that, and I have a son who is going to be learning also, we'll need to spread out the expenses. Renting is probably the way to go. Nevertheless, I'm looking at boards, boots and bindings in the event I bite the bullet and buy. I've been looking into the NS stuff....sounds like the SL might be a good choice.

Thanks again Chomps.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:09 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash View Post
....Renting is probably the way to go. Nevertheless, I'm looking at boards, boots and bindings in the event I bite the bullet and buy....
Thanks again Chomps.
Oh for sure! No harm in that. In fact, If anything it helps to fuel the Stoke!!! Gives you more motivation while suffering thru the bumps n bruises obtained while taking lessons!

The first gear to look into if you continue after the first lesson would be boots, IMO. You can get by renting boards for quite a while until you decide on exactly what board you need/want, but rental boots suck ass, so having/using a good, comfy pair of your own when on the rentals will certainly help to improve the experience!
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:48 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I was in a similar situation as you last year when I first started. I was renting and then decided to buy my own boots, boards, bindings, etc. So I'll share my experience so that you can judge yourself on what you should.

My first year last year, I spent about 20 days on the snow. This year I've already surpassed that and went about 25 days already.

Boards:
1) I started off with Burton LTR (Learn to Ride) rental boards. At this point, I was just trying to stand up and learn how to balance myself on it.

2) Read about reverse camber and how it's easier to learn. So I went out and board a Sierra reverse Crew board.

a)Pro's - Not catching any edges, easy to learn, gave me more confidence as i progressed.
b) Con's - As I started progressing, I realized that it was really loose board and not very stable.

3)Hybrid Camber - (Flat in the middle) Wanted to try a loose board with flat section in the middle and reverse at the tip and tail. Went out and purchase the Capital Horrorscope after the season. Rode it one day and didn't like it and sold it shortly after.
Pro's - End of season sale so was under 200 bucks.
Con's - Very soft flexing board. Kids wanted to steal this board for some odd reason.

4) Hybrid Camber - Saw Burton's flying V so wanted to try that so went out and bought the Burton Custom flying v. Rode it on hard pack and didn't like it so in my garage and will use it again on better condition days. When conditions are good this board will do ok.



5) Hybrid Camber (C2-Btx) Lib Tech T-Rice - This board is awesome but will kick your arse if you lazy on it. Glad I didn't start on this board. Magnatraction helps out on hard pack.

6) Hybrid Camber - Started reading reviews on Never Summer boards. Borrowed a friends SL and rode it and thought it was amazing. Bought last seasons model.

When buysnow.com had an error in their site by granting 50% off on all boards, I went ahead and bought myself the NS Proto HD ($275 shipped). Love this board too. I find that learning to ride switch on a twin board is a little easier than on directional board. You can still do it on the SL but maybe in my mind i think it's easier on the proto as it's a true twin. The SL is twin also but is set back a little bit. Vario grip helps on hard pack.


In the end my go to board is the Proto HD.. I'll bring the Trice when I want to be a bit more aggressive.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:05 AM   #9 (permalink)
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EKB,

Thanks dude, thats some good input there....I believe my son will ride goofy so have a board we can both ride is cool...I'll check out the proto s.omemore
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:56 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
If you have never ridden before, then none of the nuances make a lick of difference as your learning will have no comparison. Equipment makes very very little difference your first 20-50 days, while lessons, practice and technique will make every difference in progression and fun. Also nice gogs, comfortable feet and cozy clothing help.

How many days a year will u ride? Where?

Do you know how to skateboard or surf? Comfort standing sideways helps.

Forget all the camber talk.

Just buy something with a medium flex, stiff boards are a little harder to learn on, and if you buy a noodle it will be easier to learn but you will be pissed that you have a noodle once you do. You want 158-162 cm, a nice 2 inch range, you can go a little bigger or smaller, again not very important when learning.

Bindings: Burton Cartel, k2 company, salomon chief (these 3 bindings have been top all-mountains for their respective companies for years)

Or ignore everything I say and be like the guy who asked all these questions and then bought a Never Summer Raptor (AK board basically) for Michigan.
Forget all the tech bullshit, listen to this dude right here.

What I'll add is don't overspend on your first board, unless your gonna tippy toe through the learning process, within time your boards bound to get rocked up, treed up, railed up, boxed up, skated up, ski edged up, crashed up.

By the time your ability level has caught up with that fancy new stick you bought when you first started its going to be beat up and you'll probably go out and buy yourself a new ride.

Sizing is important, as is width, so is the flex, camber? meh! you'll learn on anything, it'll make more sense to you once you learn.
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