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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 02:20 PM
amirh1
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Question Specific stance question - tired rear leg

Hi all,
this is my first post to the forum (yeah!) but I've tried researching a specific answer and couldn't find it, so here goes.

I'm 6'2", ~184lbs and am a relatively new Freestyle rider (about 10 rides over the course of 2 seasons). I did take a few group lessons to get started, and now I want to get serious with snowboarding and am going back and 'checking' all the uninformed decisions I've made.

I currently ride a standard 163cm board (division X, a friend gave it to me). I use +18 -6 stance and am regular foot.

Two things bother me:
  1. When facing forward (heelside) I keep applying too much brake and have my board almost perpendicular to the direction of travel. I see people pointing their boards at at a 30-45deg angle to the slope and maintain that with big wide turns but I just don't feel stable at that angle. I feel more stable doing that on the toeside.
  2. After a few hours my rear leg gets very tired as opposed to my front leg and I get sloppy. Could be that I'm not standing forward enough.

And to my question: what stance would help me improve on these two things? Could these problems also have to do with my stance width?

Thanks, any help is greatly appreciated!!!
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 05:29 PM
gmilo00
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Are you skid turning?

On my first snowboard trip my back leg would get really tired and it was because I wasn't turning properly. Instead of putting more weight on the front of the board I would lean back and use my back leg as a rudder.

If you don't feel stable then I would think its how you are centering your weight over the board. If you lean back, you won't feel stable at all.

I think it has more to do with your technique than your stance angles or width, etc
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 05:37 PM
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I don't think it has anything to do with your stance. I think it is more about technique and fatigue. Almost everyone gets sore back legs towards the end of the day because that leg is initiating all of your turns.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 05:39 PM
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Keep a balanced weight and keep your knees bent. Sounds like you're doing skidded turns, the people you see are carving.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 05:41 PM
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I find the complete opposite happens to me, my front leg (outside of my calf in particular) gets murderously painful after only a few runs. I was in Japan in January and tha pain got so bad at times it made me feel sick to my stomach, to the extent that even chairlifts were too painfun to catch without unclipping and taking a rest. I've got myself some custom footbeds moulded now but wont be able to check to see if they work until it starts snowing down here in Australia (still likr 4 months away)

My back leg only comes into the equation when riding extremely deep powder, in which i get a bit of burn in my quad muscle.

If you're riding deep powder then expect your back leg to get tired, if you are tiring out your back leg on groomed runs then you're probably having difficulty turning as well, try making a conscious effort to put more weight on your front foot maybe. Back to the basics you learned in the lessons until it becomes second nature.

Last edited by Reede; 03-07-2009 at 05:44 PM.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 06:42 PM
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Reede sounds like you might need to adjust your boots or bindings
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 06:48 PM
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Yea as i said, i've since got a pair of custom footbeds for my boots so hopefully that helps a bit and it is a brand new setup so i still have some binding tweaks to make, some tweaks have helped but I am yet to find a silver bullet for the problem unfortunately. Ive played around with stance width and forward lean as well as limited changes to the bindings angles but its hard to nail down exactly that is causing it.

Last edited by Reede; 03-07-2009 at 06:50 PM.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 06:59 PM
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yeah i think you are skid turning which can tired out your back leg, and this should only really be used when you are learning to board, then you should progress to making all turns with your front foot and try to stay away from using your upper body to turn, but use your feet to initiate and control turns. skid turning is good however for real steep slopes that you can't carve or that are really too bumpy to hold a carve.

Last edited by twin89; 03-07-2009 at 07:01 PM. Reason: edit
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-07-2009, 11:14 PM
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Learn to ride switch, you will be a better rider and you will have less fatigue.
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