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-   -   The board is "unforgiving" (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/144241-board-unforgiving.html)

LA Forever 08-16-2014 03:33 AM

The board is "unforgiving"
 
A little background on me before I ask my question: I learned how to board on my friend's Burton Vapor (I know, right?). He rides goofy, and I ride regular, but he never changed the binding settings. I learned how to carve in about 3-4 sessions... while riding regular on goofy settings. This was the winter on 2012.

Fast forward to now, I can do greens, blues, and blacks just fine with my Flying V, but I feel like I've pretty much pushed that board to its limits and I want to upgrade. I have been looking at the Custom X and all the specs and tech seem to be amazing. I am looking for a faster board, but I have seen many reviews on it, calling it "unforgiving". Can you guys please give me a better understanding on what that truly means? I don't want to ride the thing and just eat snow the whole time on the mountain. I can carve well, but it's apparently pretty easy to do on a Flying V. How about on the Custom X? Thanks guys!

neni 08-16-2014 04:33 AM

Unforgiving can mean many things, and it depends on what you compare. Unforgiving has a negative note, but can be positive, depending on what you seek.... e.g. you could translate "forgiving" to "less precise". The term is usually used for advanced boards on the stiffer side, which - if you know what you do with your edges - ride more precise, responsive, predictable and stable than soft boards. They'll do exactly and immediately what you "tell" them, enabeling control e.g. when riding higher speed or carving. But the more precise a board is, the more you also need to ride them precisely. They won't "forgive" you akward movements i.e. they'll react to these unintended akward movements as precisely and immediately as to intended ones. If you're a beginner, you don't want a board which reacts immediately to each slight weight shift cos you haven't control over you body n balance yet. You need a "forgiving" board, i.e. one that forgives (=won't react to) slight off balance movements. The more you advance (= have control over your movements) the more you'll seek for a board which translates your precise movements.
Kind of like driving a normal station wagon vs. a Porsche :)

They also can be unforgiving in terms of being less smoothe in uneven terrain. While you can cruise pretty stiff legged on a soft board over crud (it'll bend and absorb the unevenness), you're likely to get bucked off on a stiff board doing the same. The stiffer the board, the more you'll need to use your knees as bumpers.

Are you aware of the difference between a carve and a skidded turn? It's kind of essential to judge, if the Custom X would suit you well... If you actually do carve (rail through a turn a leaving a clean trench, no skidding) would mean that you have pretty good control over you weight distribution and movements. If you'd like to progress that skill (tighter turns, get more acceleration out of the turn, at higher speed, longer deeper perfect trenches), the Custom X would be a sweet board.

The Custom X will be less forgiving than your Flying V (it's camber shape is more catchy, you have to do precise transitions), but compared to other rather stiff advanced boards, it is pretty forgiving cos it still has smoothe dampening in uneven terrain (where e.g. a Volkl Coal will rattle your teeth). If you want a board that carves great and is stable at speed and still pretty smoothe in crud, the Custom X is great. The NS Raptor would be an option as well (that one less catchy due to its hybrid rocker shape and better in pow, if that's also something you want to aim at, but it's bit less precise due to this shape than the camber of the Custom X, e.g. if you want to straight line flatbased).

Lamps 08-16-2014 06:15 AM

You will be just fine. I have a quiver of burton boards, 2 Flying V, 2 cambered. I'm an intermediate rider. If I ride FV for a few consecutive days then switch to camber I will need to pay a little more attention, particularly first day I switch but it's not like you get pounded.

The most common place this happens is not when riding aggressively but when lazily cruising or traversing, at end of day when you're not paying attention.

Go for it, sounds like you're plenty ready.

ridinbend 08-16-2014 09:06 AM

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Was your friends vapor a full camber board? Camber can be construed as unforgiving because the contract points in your boards edge are the furthest away from your feet on a camber shape. It'll be really fast, hard carving beast. May not be the best choice for So Cal resorts but that's ok. Ultimately everybody learns to ride whatever it is they purchase in the whatever terrain they're riding.

poutanen 08-16-2014 11:00 AM

The Custom X will be fine, people are pussies these days... If you're looking for more stability at speed then the Custom X will work. Can't you demo a board somewhere?

taco tuesday 08-16-2014 11:47 AM

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Check out videos on youtube of ryan knapton buttering on a custom x and see how unforgiving it looks. It is just a slightly stiffer all mountain freestyle board. If you can ride it should be fine.

chomps1211 08-16-2014 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poutanen (Post 1781953)
The Custom X will be fine, people are pussies these days... If you're looking for more stability at speed then the Custom X will work...

:laugh: …a "Hard" board requires a "Hard" rider, eh? :laugh:

Quote:

Originally Posted by taco tuesday (Post 1782025)
Check out videos on youtube of ryan knapton buttering on a custom x and see how unforgiving it looks.

...If you can ride it should be fine.

QFT!!! Do a forum search for my "misc. video posts" thread. I've got a shitload of Ryan's tutorials there. The Man can press the shit outta that board!!! You're Damned skippy there taco!! :thumbsup:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lamps (Post 1781833)
You will be just fine….

The most common place this happens is not when riding aggressively but when lazily cruising or traversing, at end of day when you're not paying attention...

Go for it, sounds like you're plenty ready.

That's the God's honest truth! I had the advantage of first learning to ride on a full camber board, so I don't fear it at all! (…not that I would classify myself as a "Hard" rider!) ;) :D

What Lamps says is true. I would most often catch an edge and eat shit
near the end of the day, when I was tired and sore, and paying more attention to my aching thighs than my technique!!

Another good time to pay close attention to technique is when going slow or at middlin' speed on cut up, and tracked out hard pack or icy conditions. That's when your contact points are more likely to catch on a rut or track and punish you for inattention.

Hope none of that puts you off going for it! If you ride as well as you claim? You really shouldn't have much trouble. :thumbsup:

LA Forever 08-16-2014 01:11 PM

Wow, thanks for all the awesome feedback and comments, you guys rock. I would demo it, but knowing myself, I'll buy it anyways and learn how to ride it. :laugh:

Quote:

Originally Posted by ridinbend (Post 1781881)
Was your friends vapor a full camber board

I'm sure it was. It was the 07 or 08 model. That thing was fast...

Nivek 08-16-2014 02:12 PM

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Figure out what you really want out of a board and then see what models fit that. Don't find a board then see if it fits your style.

If you just want all the fancy shit but aren't looking for a board to go uber fast on and carve super hard just get an Antler.

Add for that dude buttering the X, you can cut down a tree with a hatchet, but isn't a chainsaw more efficient and more fun? Right tool for the job. Just cause someone else can bend the fuck out of that board doesn't make it any easier to ride for the average rider.

taco tuesday 08-16-2014 02:31 PM

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I'm not saying he should use the custom x for a park board or anything. Just pointed out that a skilled rider can butter the hell out it so someone who has progressed to the point that they feel the flying v(custom flying v is my assumption) no longer suits them who also learned originally on a cambered board should be able to ride the x just fine. Is it the perfect board for the op? I don't know. Are there tons of other boards that would suit the op as well? Absolutely. Is the custom x to " unforgiving" for the op(which was the original question)? I doubt it.


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