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Old 10-02-2009, 12:29 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default what makes a board "forgiving"?

i first started out with a k2 fuse board. the board seems to be pretty flexi and light. so far from what i have read, softer boards are usually more forgiving? but by that definition, a board that is easier to turn and more sensitive on turns is more forgiving? from my experience, i have problems with my turns being too sensitive where every little movement i do can start a turn. it would throw me off sometimes, especially on flats. so wouldn't a stiffer board be less sensitive? and therefore more forgiving?

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Old 10-02-2009, 01:25 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 10-02-2009, 02:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Old 10-04-2009, 02:33 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Old 10-04-2009, 09:42 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yusoweird View Post
i first started out with a k2 fuse board. the board seems to be pretty flexi and light. so far from what i have read, softer boards are usually more forgiving? but by that definition, a board that is easier to turn and more sensitive on turns is more forgiving? from my experience, i have problems with my turns being too sensitive where every little movement i do can start a turn. it would throw me off sometimes, especially on flats. so wouldn't a stiffer board be less sensitive? and therefore more forgiving?

The reason soft is forgiving is that it takes more work from the rider to get the board to do something. So you can do some extra/bad movements and they won't effect what the board is doing as much.

A stiffer (less forgiving) board is the opposite, every little movement your body makes gets transferred into the board, and things happen much faster and with more amplitude.

It is not so much how "easy" a board is to turn. I am not sure what kind of board the Fuse is, but pretty much all snowboarding is 90% rider. I would look at how you are starting/controlling your turns. Are you using your shoulders and upper body (not a very good way)? Are you using your feet, just too much? Check out our learn to snowboard videos. They will give you a good idea of what to do and how much to do it.

Hope this helps.

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Old 10-05-2009, 10:35 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SnowProRick View Post
The reason soft is forgiving is that it takes more work from the rider to get the board to do something. So you can do some extra/bad movements and they won't effect what the board is doing as much.

A stiffer (less forgiving) board is the opposite, every little movement your body makes gets transferred into the board, and things happen much faster and with more amplitude.

It is not so much how "easy" a board is to turn. I am not sure what kind of board the Fuse is, but pretty much all snowboarding is 90% rider. I would look at how you are starting/controlling your turns. Are you using your shoulders and upper body (not a very good way)? Are you using your feet, just too much? Check out our learn to snowboard videos. They will give you a good idea of what to do and how much to do it.

Hope this helps.

--rick
I am not really worrying about how to snowboard, I know I just need more experience. But so far what I have read about soft vs stiff board and the term "forgiving" kindda confuses me. I thought a softer board takes less work since it is more flexible, therefore easier to transfer movements? and vice versa... What you just described said it is the opposite...
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Old 10-05-2009, 10:59 AM   #7 (permalink)
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A flexy board will take more force to twist. Simplify it and think about physics. Something with less torsional rigidity will take more movement or force to make it travel the same distance. It may just be a matter of force or initial input.
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Old 10-05-2009, 02:07 PM   #8 (permalink)
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also the edge bevel makes a huge difference in how many times you catch an edge while starting out as a noob.
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Old 10-05-2009, 04:38 PM   #9 (permalink)
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You're right in what you're saying mr wolf, but you have your metals reversed Aluminum is much more ridid than steel, it's just that it's a softer metal, but not more flexible.
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Old 10-05-2009, 08:53 PM   #10 (permalink)
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You're right in what you're saying mr wolf, but you have your metals reversed Aluminum is much more ridid than steel, it's just that it's a softer metal, but not more flexible.
Actually if your considering bars of the same size and shape the aluminum is more flexible (has a lower modulus).
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