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Old 12-21-2009, 06:01 PM   #1 (permalink)
NorthCalStar
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Default are the people at the shop full of it?

Im a person that likes to do things right the first time and i take my time and do a lot research. I feel the people at shop just want to sell me equipment. telling me ya that is a great buy and so. just want to make sure im getting a board that fits what is a good size for me?

I know i want a all mtn/ freestyle board

Im 6ft 200lbs and have 11 size foot?

what size binding?

the girl that was helping me was telling me the board should come up to my lip and i need a wide board. Is this correct info?

They dont seem to have a huge selection but enough you can say. I feel they are trying just to sell anything. They seem like good peole just a bit pushey.

im ready to hit the slopes this weekend!!!!!!!

THX
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Old 12-21-2009, 06:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Here are some general tips.

Where your nose is, does not determine what size of snowboard you should ride!

...or your chin, ears, shoulders or any other body part for that matter. These are the silliest rules for sizing boards that could possibly be imagined, and yet they persist. We hear new ones everyday, "my friend told me that a board should come to in between my chin and my nose." Why, are you planning to nibble on it? These generalities are good ways to end up with a completely inappropriate board. Why do such rules exist, you ask? It is due to the fact that finding the right board takes a bit of research and knowledge. The easy way, however incorrect, is much quicker. A snowboard reacts to only two factors, how much pressure is being applied to it (weight), and where that pressure is coming from (shoe size). Boards are designed around riders of a certain weight. The total weight range for a given board will be around 50 pounds (although manufacturers tend to exaggerate this range to make their products sellable to a wider variety of customers). Two men who stand six feet tall and have their noses at identical heights, may be separated by 100 pounds of weight. This would change the boards they should ride by two entire categories of stiffness, and length. You will also want to make sure that the board is appropriate for your shoe size. One half to three quarters of an inch of overhang (yes, overhang) off the edge of your board is ideal (when wearing snowboard boots, and measured at the stance angle that you will ride). We will discuss this more below when we address width in detail.

There is no best level of stiffness for a board!

At least five times a day we hear,"the guy at mountain told me that I want a soft board." This is the part that we were discussing above that relates to weight. Snowboards react to pressure that is applied to that hourglass shape (sidecut) that they have. This shape, when flexed, creates an arc on the snow. You are planning on turning on that arc. If you can't flex the sidecut into the snow (because the board is too stiff for you) you simply can't turn well, or not at all. If the board is too soft for your weight, it will constantly be overflexing, and "twisting off" of the edge that you are relying on to carve. In this scenario you will have a terrible time on hardpack and ice, because the "effective edge" (amount of edge that should be in contact with the snow) will be twisted out of shape, and not doing it's job. Softer flexing boards tend to be better for lighter riders, while stiffer boards are needed for the big boys. Only for extreme freestyle, or extreme race applications, should this rule be broken (and in those instances, a second board will be needed for all mountain riding).

Buying by length is the hardest way to end up with the right board!

"My last board was a 156, and I liked it, so tell me about the 156's that you carry." The trick here, is that two boards of identical length, may be designed for completely different riders and types of riding. For example a 156 may be a "big mountain board" for a small woman, or a "park" board for a big guy, depending on the manufacturer's design plan. Those two boards, however, would never be appropriate for the same rider. Length is often discussed in terms of: longer equals faster, and more stable, while shorter equals more maneuverable. This can also be deceptive. The "running surface" of a board (the base area that contacts the snow) is a useful measurement, because this is the amount of board that you actually are riding upon. The overall length (the measurement usually considered) can be misleading, as it also contains the raised tip and tail, which do not contact the snow, and have only nuance differences in affecting your ride. Your best bet is research. Look into who the board was made for, and for what type of riding. Leave the rules of thumb to the rental guys, who are trying to get through the line of renters as quickly as possible, and get on the slopes (can't blame 'em for that).

As for width, we recently did a blog post on that. I hope it is helpful:

http://www.wiredsport.com/blog/snowboard-width/

Last edited by Wiredsport; 12-21-2009 at 06:17 PM.
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Old 12-21-2009, 06:43 PM   #3 (permalink)
bobuecker31
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The length of board based on height myth is a load of crap. As far as talking to someone at a shop you should be able to tell if they are really knowledgeable or just trying to sell you some garbage.

I am about the same size as you (6-3, 190 lbs, size 11 boots) and ride a 160 wide board, works just fine for me.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:03 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Here are some general tips.

Where your nose is, does not determine what size of snowboard you should ride!

...or your chin, ears, shoulders or any other body part for that matter. These are the silliest rules for sizing boards that could possibly be imagined, and yet they persist. We hear new ones everyday, "my friend told me that a board should come to in between my chin and my nose." Why, are you planning to nibble on it? These generalities are good ways to end up with a completely inappropriate board. Why do such rules exist, you ask? It is due to the fact that finding the right board takes a bit of research and knowledge. The easy way, however incorrect, is much quicker. A snowboard reacts to only two factors, how much pressure is being applied to it (weight), and where that pressure is coming from (shoe size). Boards are designed around riders of a certain weight. The total weight range for a given board will be around 50 pounds (although manufacturers tend to exaggerate this range to make their products sellable to a wider variety of customers). Two men who stand six feet tall and have their noses at identical heights, may be separated by 100 pounds of weight. This would change the boards they should ride by two entire categories of stiffness, and length. You will also want to make sure that the board is appropriate for your shoe size. One half to three quarters of an inch of overhang (yes, overhang) off the edge of your board is ideal (when wearing snowboard boots, and measured at the stance angle that you will ride). We will discuss this more below when we address width in detail.

There is no best level of stiffness for a board!

At least five times a day we hear,"the guy at mountain told me that I want a soft board." This is the part that we were discussing above that relates to weight. Snowboards react to pressure that is applied to that hourglass shape (sidecut) that they have. This shape, when flexed, creates an arc on the snow. You are planning on turning on that arc. If you can't flex the sidecut into the snow (because the board is too stiff for you) you simply can't turn well, or not at all. If the board is too soft for your weight, it will constantly be overflexing, and "twisting off" of the edge that you are relying on to carve. In this scenario you will have a terrible time on hardpack and ice, because the "effective edge" (amount of edge that should be in contact with the snow) will be twisted out of shape, and not doing it's job. Softer flexing boards tend to be better for lighter riders, while stiffer boards are needed for the big boys. Only for extreme freestyle, or extreme race applications, should this rule be broken (and in those instances, a second board will be needed for all mountain riding).

Buying by length is the hardest way to end up with the right board!

"My last board was a 156, and I liked it, so tell me about the 156's that you carry." The trick here, is that two boards of identical length, may be designed for completely different riders and types of riding. For example a 156 may be a "big mountain board" for a small woman, or a "park" board for a big guy, depending on the manufacturer's design plan. Those two boards, however, would never be appropriate for the same rider. Length is often discussed in terms of: longer equals faster, and more stable, while shorter equals more maneuverable. This can also be deceptive. The "running surface" of a board (the base area that contacts the snow) is a useful measurement, because this is the amount of board that you actually are riding upon. The overall length (the measurement usually considered) can be misleading, as it also contains the raised tip and tail, which do not contact the snow, and have only nuance differences in affecting your ride. Your best bet is research. Look into who the board was made for, and for what type of riding. Leave the rules of thumb to the rental guys, who are trying to get through the line of renters as quickly as possible, and get on the slopes (can't blame 'em for that).

As for width, we recently did a blog post on that. I hope it is helpful:

The Boarder's Blog - Snowboard Width - Huh?
wiredsport thx a lot you have been of great help i mean way better then people at the shop. makes way more sence now. i think im on the right track. looking at 163 wide flow merc its on hold but like i said i dont mind having a used board even later models but that is of quality. they are selling it for $350 with binds flow flite. looking at the spec on the board should fit but im in the middle.

should i go in the lager side or smaller?

Thx to all at this forum love it hear. More and more im becoming an out doors person. just got into mtn biking great sport too. I have been a weekend golfer and just love the out doors

any suggestion welcome for some boards and binding looking to spend 400 or so
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:14 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthCalStar View Post
but like i said i dont mind having a used board even later models but that is of quality. they are selling it for $350 with binds flow flite. looking at the spec on the board should fit but im in the middle.
There are a lot of great value products from last year. You can get the 2009 Merc plus a majorly upgraded binding like the M11's from the previous year for less than that offer for the current season Merc with the flite binings. I would suggest going with the higher end products and the older graphics. You will actually fit best on the Merc 160 standard width at your specs. Size 11 does not require "wide" in that model and the extra width will hurt your performance with that model.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:17 PM   #6 (permalink)
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THE 'GIRL' TOLD YOU UP TO YOUR LIP?!?!!? AHAHAHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAA!!

Wow.. That is hilarious.. You do not need a wide board. (for most boards) You should also be getting large bindings, and ride a 154-157 cm board.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:26 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Progress View Post
THE 'GIRL' TOLD YOU UP TO YOUR LIP?!?!!? AHAHAHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAA!!

Wow.. That is hilarious.. You do not need a wide board. (for most boards) You should also be getting large bindings, and ride a 154-157 cm board.
I must say she was hot looking but that is not the case. I did not know finding a board was so hard hahahahahh!!! the only problem trying boots i did not fit in size 11 but size 12 boots

so a smaller board is best or a larger one seem im in the middle?
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:32 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthCalStar View Post
I must say she was hot looking but that is not the case. I did not know finding a board was so hard hahahahahh!!! the only problem trying boots i did not fit in size 11 but size 12 boots

so a smaller board is best or a larger one seem im in the middle?
That depends. If you are truly a size 11 foot and this boot really is the correct fit, then in effect it is still an 11, even if the manufacrurer calls it a 12.

Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters).

About boot fit:

Your boots should be snug!

The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not to tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!
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