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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:02 AM Thread Starter
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Damage Assessment: I Really Did It This Time!

Hey all,

I got a little tired at the end of the day and axed a box with the edge of my board which resulted in some pretty significant damage. I got the professional opinion from the resort's repair technician, but I was hoping to get more info from you guys. Here's the damage:







As you can see the impact pushed the edge inward and pushed out my base almost 1/4" at the highest point; The sidewall however is still intact. There's some wood exposed and the two colors of my sintered base are separated (obviously some sort of die-cut). I was told by the repair tech that the damage occurred in the worst possible location, costly repair, and will never seal up properly. He figured it'll just crack open again every time I ride it due to it's location, how much flex it experiences, and die-cut base.

I'm not looking to toss out this board if I can avoid it, but I understand that some damages are just to severe. What do you guys think or suggest? Can anyone recommend a good repair shop in Southern California?

Best regards,
Dave
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:12 AM
T-Rex
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i hate to say it, but the repair tech is right.... not likely to seal properly again, and will be an expensive "professional" repair.....

however, if it was me.. I'd fix it myself and jib the heck out of it for the rest of the season then get a new one this summer.. Pull the edge out a bit to epoxy down the die-cut base sheet(s), gently tap the edge back in place and epoxy that too, and grind off any part of the rail that sits out of line (and remember that you won't have proper edge contact there), then sand down the base layer where it "bulges" from the epoxy (so the wax will still coat evenly), then let the epoxy sit for 48 hours, and shred your face off!!
post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:16 AM
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i did that to my deck...i didn't bother fixing it... it's going to be a used as a shelf.

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Last edited by bluetroll; 02-26-2010 at 01:10 AM.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by bluetroll View Post
i did that to my deck... it's not going to be a used as a shelf.
did what? fix it, or bust it?
post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:22 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by T-Rex View Post
i hate to say it, but the repair tech is right.... not likely to seal properly again, and will be an expensive "professional" repair.....

however, if it was me.. I'd fix it myself and jib the heck out of it for the rest of the season then get a new one this summer.. Pull the edge out a bit to epoxy down the die-cut base sheet(s), gently tap the edge back in place and epoxy that too, and grind off any part of the rail that sits out of line (and remember that you won't have proper edge contact there), then sand down the base layer where it "bulges" from the epoxy (so the wax will still coat evenly), then let the epoxy sit for 48 hours, and shred your face off!!
LOL, you're an optimist and I like it. How would I go about pulling the edge back out?
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:23 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluetroll View Post
it's not going to be a used as a shelf.
I have absolutely no idea what you're referring to here. Could you elaborate?
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by T-Rex View Post
i hate to say it, but the repair tech is right.... not likely to seal properly again, and will be an expensive "professional" repair.....

however, if it was me.. I'd fix it myself and jib the heck out of it for the rest of the season then get a new one this summer.. Pull the edge out a bit to epoxy down the die-cut base sheet(s), gently tap the edge back in place and epoxy that too, and grind off any part of the rail that sits out of line (and remember that you won't have proper edge contact there), then sand down the base layer where it "bulges" from the epoxy (so the wax will still coat evenly), then let the epoxy sit for 48 hours, and shred your face off!!
I agree. get some heavy duty epoxy and go to work. get a new one this summer
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:41 AM Thread Starter
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So let me make sure I have this right. I probably tap the edge back into place as best I can w/a Ball-Peen Hammer, then press the die-cut back into place, apply a Marine Grade slow-curing epoxy, and finish by sanding down flush. What grit sanding blocks would one use on a base? I'm pretty handy with stuff like this, but I want to make sure I get it right. I'm pretty tired of learning the hard way. =)

Thanks again, guys!
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:41 AM
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LOL, you're an optimist and I like it. How would I go about pulling the edge back out?
very carefully, you don't want to disturb the edge that's still attached.. put the board in a bench vice (use a rag to protect it), then use a flat head screwdriver and a pair of pliers to gently move the rail back to straight (or slightly pushed out to allow room for base layer to lay back down), when steel is cold it doesn't like to bend, but when heated you run the risk of causing massive delam and layer separation in the board.. So your best bet is to GENTLY manipulate the rail away from the base layer with repeated gentle taps and tugs.. NOT a hard quick pull. (that will crack or destroy the rail and you'll be SOL)
post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Legacy View Post
So let me make sure I have this right. I probably tap the edge back into place as best I can w/a Ball-Peen Hammer, then press the die-cut back into place, apply a Marine Grade slow-curing epoxy, and finish by sanding down flush. What grit sanding blocks would one use on a base? I'm pretty handy with stuff like this, but I want to make sure I get it right. I'm pretty tired of learning the hard way. =)

Thanks again, guys!
REMOVE THE WAX FIRST.

the rail needs to come AWAY from the board first, or the base won't lay back down. remember the rail is pushed into the board... so you gotta "pull the dent" then epoxy the base layer back down, put it in a vice while the epoxy sets.. so that you make sure the base is flush.. then using a ball-peen or something similar (DO NOT HEAT) gently tap the rail back into place, making sure that it's not to low (a slightly beveled up rail would be safer than a slightly low rail), grind off any burrs or notches that will inevitably form on the rail.. then sand down the base to make sure it's flush with the rest of the base (probably a course grit if it's really bad, but a fine grit will suffice for MINOR adjustments), remember wax will fill in little imperfections.. so finish with re-applying the board wax, making sure that the finish is flush and the rail doesn't "hang" in any area, then... JIB TILL YOUR HEART'S CONTENT!!

keep in mind that the structural integrity has been comprimised, and therefore will never be the same, but it SHOULD hold up to some gnarly jibbin for the remainder of the season.
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