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VESPADADDY 12-09-2010 09:43 AM

Will this board work ok for me?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi All,

I've decided to try snowboarding for the first time. I'm 5-10, 175lbs, 40 years old. My plan is to take a lesson or two at one of the local Minnesota ski hills, and then take a trip to do some mountain freeriding in Colorado in Jan.

Does this board setup look adequate for a beginning boarder? I was able to put this setup together for free, as one friend gave me the boots and bindings (Burton Mission bindings and Moto Boots), and another buddy gave me this Rossignol board.

Given that I don't intend to do any of the half-pipe tricks, and just want to have fun carving down the mountain, does this setup look adequate for a beginner? I've attached a photo of the board, because aside from the brand (Rossignol), I don't know much about the board. I was told it was about 12 years old. It's symmetrical, front to back. I was also told it is plastic all the way through (no wood). It does still have camber when I lay it on a flat floor. The board is 162 cm long, and the graphic looks like a stylized tin man.

If this board will work just fine for a beginner, (I suspect it will), I'll use it to learn some skills, and as a board to ride for general free riding/carving in Colorado. That said, if the wisdom here says that it would NOT be a good board to use, I can always scour CraigsList for a different used board (assuming the bindings are OK).

Thoughts? I'll watch this thread closely, so if I've left out any key info, plz ask and I'll post it up toot sweet.

Thanks!

maybeitsjustme 12-09-2010 09:58 AM

That board is 12 years old? The tech has changed a lot--and while you certainly don't need the latest and greatest--you could make it a lot easier for yourself to learn with something that is not so outdated.

I would recommend going to a ski shop nearby the mountain and renting a board for your first few days to see if you like it. At that point, maybe you'll be more willing to commit a little more cash to something that isnt gonig to make you hate the sport.

12 years ago, I don't remember hearing of a board without a wood core. The only thing that comes to mind is what sims was doing with some alumninum core stuff..

TLN 12-09-2010 09:59 AM

Well...
At first: You cannot "take a lesson or two and then take a trip to do some mountain freeriding". Really. Or you hot to take 10 or more days, or it's not a freeriding. Do you really think you'd get on this soo quickly?

Whis setup is free. So it rides like setup for $0. You can get down, but nothing more. Any $200 board is better. So is the boots. But you can ride it for some time, just to decide if you want to procees wiyh snowboarding or not. And definately: that is not a freeride or carving(even just for fun) board.

Honestly, ride this stuff for 5 days, and if you feel snowboarding is for you, get the normal one board, boots and bindings. Let's be honest, i doubt you can carve in your 1st year. Can't say about freeriding, but i think it's for second year too(definately not for this board).

maybeitsjustme 12-09-2010 10:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TLN (Post 339753)
Well...
At first: You cannot "take a lesson or two and then take a trip to do some mountain freeriding". Really. Or you hot to take 10 or more days, or it's not a freeriding. Do you really think you'd get on this soo quickly?

Whis setup is free. So it rides like setup for $0. You can get down, but nothing more. Any $200 board is better. So is the boots. But you can ride it for some time, just to decide if you want to procees wiyh snowboarding or not. And definately: that is not a freeride or carving(even just for fun) board.

Honestly, ride this stuff for 5 days, and if you feel snowboarding is for you, get the normal one board, boots and bindings. Let's be honest, i doubt you can carve in your 1st year. Can't say about freeriding, but i think it's for second year too(definately not for this board).

I think this goes without saying. By "free riding" and "carving" I went ahead and assumed he meant turning, and linking turns.

TLN 12-09-2010 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maybeitsjustme (Post 339759)
I think this goes without saying. By "free riding" and "carving" I went ahead and assumed he meant turning, and linking turns.

Dunno. May be he gonna hit the big mountains after a two lesson days on this :rolleyes:

VESPADADDY 12-09-2010 10:24 AM

terminology
 
I'm concerned that my terminology is a bit off. All I'm looking to do is ride down, in control, being able to turn and go where I want to go. I *am* expecting to be able to pick this up and learn at an average pace, but I'm not expecting to be great at it right away.

That said, I'm pretty sure I'll be willing to fall down enough times to eventually get the hang of boarding. I think perhaps what I should have said was 'cruising'. I don't plan to ride down black diamond runs or anything, I just want to cruise down the hill with my friends and have a little fun.

I know that people will generally suggest that I buy something more modern, but I'm most interested in knowing *why* this particular board is too old to be a decent choice to learn/cruise on.

I was told that this board does NOT have a wood core--it's a Rossignol that's about 12 years old. That's all I know about it.

Thanks for the previous (and any subsequent) feedback.

TLN 12-09-2010 10:47 AM

That's closer to the true =)

You will get a lot of fun, if you freinds doesn't ride fast. Be ready to fall all the time for 2-3 days.
I think it doesn't matter if it got a wood core or not. You won't feel the difference.

Cons of this setup(IMO):
1. Boots. Modern boots offer more comfort, and that's the main thing. You contact the board with your feet. Also this may not give enought hold.
2. Binders. All the same. All about hold and response.
3. Board edges. They must be sharp enough, eve for the newbie.
4. Board response. Hard to explain, but modern board are more predictable.

JoeR 12-09-2010 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VESPADADDY (Post 339745)
Does this board setup look adequate for a beginning boarder? I was able to put this setup together for free, as one friend gave me the boots and bindings (Burton Mission bindings and Moto Boots), and another buddy gave me this Rossignol board.

Will you be able to mount the bindings on the board? Burton bindings (non-EST) use a three-hole insert pattern. Your Rossi board has a four-hole pattern. Did the bindings come with an alternative, four-hole adapter disc?

VESPADADDY 12-09-2010 11:25 AM

I've got the Burton UniDisc, and yup, they'll fit.

JoeR 12-09-2010 12:23 PM

Then I say, go for it. Just ride it. This is not the sort of setup I would choose for myself, or recommend to a beginner, but heck -- it's totally free. Try it out for a while and take some lessons. Once you make a bit of progress you can decide about purchasing a better, more up-to-date board and fresher boots.


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