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Old 12-14-2010, 08:37 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Need advice on what to buy for first snowboard

Hey everyone, I am looking into buying my first board and I could really use some advice. I've been on 4 boarding trips and was on the slopes on average of 3 times per trip. I've had a few lessons and the last trip I was linking turns and progressing nicely. I'd still consider myself a beginner since I go once a year, if that, so I need a good board to learn and have fun on, but that can progress with me into the intermediate stage and learn some tricks on. I am a girl, but I'm not one of those girls who is going to pick a board by how "pretty" it is. I just want a solid board that is going to perform and be a blast to ride. I've done a lot of research, looked over a ton of forums, and this is the list of boards I've come up with:

1.) Burton Feel Good
2.) Ride Promise
3.) Gnu B-pro rocker
4.) K2 Eco Pop
5.) Never Summer Infinity
6.) Rome Blue

I realize some of these boards are similar to others and some are pretty different so my main question is A) are there any major "yes" or "no" boards on my list and B) does anyone have a personal preference out of the boards listed? I'd appreciate any input. Thanks!
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Old 12-14-2010, 08:53 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Need advice on what to buy for first snowboard

hi, slk2010. I go with number 1 Burton. Try to go to the shop and ask them what's really best for you. Buy a board that you know your comfortable with.
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:58 PM   #3 (permalink)
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hi, slk2010. I go with number 1 Burton. Try to go to the shop and ask them what's really best for you. Buy a board that you know your comfortable with.
i wouldn't necessarily go by what a shop tells her to buy. she is still learning EVERYTHING about the sport and the poor girl will probably get talked into buying a board that's totally out of her league.

let me start by asking the OP this, where do you ride?
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Old 12-15-2010, 12:30 AM   #4 (permalink)
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First things first: stop looking at boards, go down to a shop, get fit for boots, and spend a couple hours trying them on. Maybe check out some insoles. Boots first, everything else second.

You've already done your research but honestly it's not going to tell you anything. I've been on some super low key stuff I loved and some pretty hyped stuff that I was not that big on. I could tell you some stuff about the different companies and rocker versus camber, blah blah blah but where you're at it would probably just confuse you.

Just pick the board you can get the best price on, flip a coin, or get the one you think is prettiest. At this point you're not really going to be able to tell that big a difference anyway. They're all high-quality boards, you can learn tricks on all of them, and none of them are going to keep you from progressing or having a blast unless you go horribly wrong with sizing or are just insanely whiny. Too many beginners (and I was definitely in this group) obsess too much about gear and not enough about riding. Once you've owned something, got the basics down, and have a sense of what you like and what you don't like, then you can start worrying about the nuances of gear selection. At this point I'd just nab something, make sure it's not a piece of crap, and go ride.

And let's face it, you go once a year... unless you have cash to burn I'd just invest in good boots and then find something off Craigslist for cheap. You can find high end equipment for very good prices if you look hard enough.
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Old 12-15-2010, 06:33 AM   #5 (permalink)
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i wouldn't necessarily go by what a shop tells her to buy. she is still learning EVERYTHING about the sport and the poor girl will probably get talked into buying a board that's totally out of her league.

let me start by asking the OP this, where do you ride?

I'm looking into moving to Colorado, the breck/keystone/vail area so that's where I'd predominately be riding.
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Old 12-15-2010, 06:43 AM   #6 (permalink)
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And let's face it, you go once a year... unless you have cash to burn I'd just invest in good boots and then find something off Craigslist for cheap. You can find high end equipment for very good prices if you look hard enough.

That's the thing though, I'm looking into moving to Colorado in the next month so I plan to be riding a ton. I'm a pretty quick learner and like I said, I was linking turns my 2nd trip and linking them the first run on my 3rd trip. I plan on progressing quickly since I'll be going at least 3 times a week. Does that change your stance any? Also, as you have pointed out, boots are very important. I haven't neglected to think about them, but I figured I would start with a board and then work my way through boots and bindings. I've heard a good pair of boots is worth their weight in gold, and the same goes for bindings. What is your boot recommendation?

I have researched the camber vs rocker vs hybrid situation and I feel like I have a decent understanding of all of it. I guess my MAIN question is why do some people think that rocker is better for beginners. Some say "you catch less edge" and others say "you can learn to ride anything, a beginner can't tell the difference". Thoughts?
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Old 12-15-2010, 07:24 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Hi
I ride an Infinity for the past year. I had a Feelgood before and I've tried the Feelgood V rocker. I think the Infinity is an excellent board to learn and progress on. (Wish I'd learned on it) It is harder to catch an edge and it will give you confidence. Also the Infinity has a very responsive flex and good edgehold with their vario sidecut. Good in all conditions. Probably the gnu b-pro C2 would be comparable. I haven't ridden it but it has similar technology- rocker between the bindings and camber towards the ends with edgehold tech in this case magna traction. But make sure you get a model with C2. Rocker camber gives you good stability and nice turns along the whole edge. It will be a better all mountain board.

I know people who like the Feelgood V rocker (which I think is a slight improvement)but I like the rocker camber technology better. Two of my friends who haven't been riding long tried my board and bought it.
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Old 12-15-2010, 08:03 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I agree with other posts; boots first then a board.

I just bought a board and in my extensive research and questioning I had narrowed my list down to:

- K2 Eco Pop
- Roxy Eminence
- Never Summer Infinity
- Endeavor Diamond.

For Colorado riding I think I would go with the Infinity but really, all those boards are high end, good quality boards. Just go with the best deal you can find. If you can find a demo day somewhere that's even better. That way you can demo a few different technologies such as camber, rocker, R/C, C2, magna traction etc. and then go with the board that you like best.
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Old 12-15-2010, 08:56 AM   #9 (permalink)
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That's the thing though, I'm looking into moving to Colorado in the next month so I plan to be riding a ton. I'm a pretty quick learner and like I said, I was linking turns my 2nd trip and linking them the first run on my 3rd trip. I plan on progressing quickly since I'll be going at least 3 times a week. Does that change your stance any? Also, as you have pointed out, boots are very important. I haven't neglected to think about them, but I figured I would start with a board and then work my way through boots and bindings. I've heard a good pair of boots is worth their weight in gold, and the same goes for bindings. What is your boot recommendation?

I have researched the camber vs rocker vs hybrid situation and I feel like I have a decent understanding of all of it. I guess my MAIN question is why do some people think that rocker is better for beginners. Some say "you catch less edge" and others say "you can learn to ride anything, a beginner can't tell the difference". Thoughts?
My recommendation for boots is exactly what I said: go down to a shop, spend a couple hours trying them on. If you don't have good shops around you, then wait until you get to Colorado next month and do it. You don't necessary need to skimp on boots, but I'd stay away from the low-end stuff (less durability) and spend whatever you have to. If you have to spend $100 more on boots and skimp on your board, then do it. Boots are too important to fuck around with and go off internet recommendations. For more help, check this out.

My opinion on rocker camber for beginners: learning on camber will make you a better rider in the long term. Rocker is more forgiving, so you fall less, but you can develop bad habits. Rocker is also less precise since the flip side of catching fewer edges is that it takes a slight bit more effort longer to engage a turn from the contact points. I am on a Never Summer SL, which is my favorite board and combines the best elements of the two. I ride both but increasingly if you made me pick one I'd go with camber for the precision. But that's my preference.

Again, my recommendation stands: get good boots, for board and bindings just buy something and try not to worry about it. If it was me, I'd get an Infinity and call it a day. But snowboarding is all preference and you're not in a position to know your preferences, so it's going to be a crapshoot no matter what you do. Don't stress about it, pick something, find some binders, and go focus on progression and less on what's strapped to your feet.

Last edited by kimchijajonshim; 12-15-2010 at 09:01 AM.
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