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Old 01-13-2011, 04:08 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Stance - doing it wrong?

So , was reading another thread where everyone is posting their stance.

Seems like mine is VASTLY different.

I'm pretty sure I ride a +18 deg front, +6 back and 22.5 stance width at 6' and 200#'s
All mountain board with 2" setback - 159cm

I started very late season riding last year and have only 4 times out this year. Is this a beginner stance or, did I setup wrong based on old info on the interwebs?

Is duck preferred now? I just slide down the hills, no parks yet...would like to hit some sweet jumps sometime soon once I master edges.
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Old 01-13-2011, 04:56 PM   #2 (permalink)
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There is no such thing as "wrong". Your stance is 100% personal preference. Not all of us are former ballerinas that can actually ride +18/-18 ducks.

You stance is a forward stance and is great for freedriding, carving, and generally hauling ass down a mountain. Where it doesn't do so well is riding switch since, well, your feet are facing the other way. But that's fine! It's doable, just awkward as you are looking over your shoulder and balance is trickier. If you are considering hitting a booter or two, then you must accept that you may occasionally land switched (180 off a jump perhaps). You could try moving to a more neutral stance instead of an all out duck; perhaps +15/0 or +15/-3. Do whatever you're comfortable riding with.

Duck stances are popular with all of the freestylers since it does make for an easier time riding switch (a true twin board and centered stance helps as well).

Stances are a very personal thing; play with it and find something you like. No harm in having multiple stance angles that you like for different types of riding; just means you need to bring a screwdriver!
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Old 01-13-2011, 08:06 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Sincraft View Post
So , was reading another thread where everyone is posting their stance.

Seems like mine is VASTLY different.

I'm pretty sure I ride a +18 deg front, +6 back and 22.5 stance width at 6' and 200#'s
All mountain board with 2" setback - 159cm

I started very late season riding last year and have only 4 times out this year. Is this a beginner stance or, did I setup wrong based on old info on the interwebs?

Is duck preferred now? I just slide down the hills, no parks yet...would like to hit some sweet jumps sometime soon once I master edges.
Cooper is right about stance being your personal preference.

However, there are certain limits based on the hardware. The only thing I am questioning is your combination of 22.5 stance width and forward stance. I've seen plenty of freestylers ride duck with a 22.5 (and larger) stance width but never freeriders using (stiff boot and binding) forward stance.

BTW, the old reference freeride stance was appx: +30, +15, 20 width (shoulder), and whatever the board setback was.

Hope this helps - Nito
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Old 01-13-2011, 08:51 PM   #4 (permalink)
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My stance was even more forward than that when I first started. It just felt like I had more control. Since then my stance has slowly migrated to being duck. Whatever feels right.
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Old 01-13-2011, 11:29 PM   #5 (permalink)
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yea i guess i never thought about riding switch, I just dont. I did when I was learning last year for the first few runs, only going on my heel edge but now I'm still trying to get well at linking nose/heel

my width was what was recommended based on riding types and shoulder width. I have to be careful about putting my bindings too close to 0 because my feet are big and the board is only a midwide. Shouldnt be a problem though.

Board is not a twin though. Rossi storm. has a decent setback too from what I can tell and measure. I think they say 1" but I measured 2 with the default bolt settings. I measured my shoulders, added an inch then moved the bindings as close to that from the center (first set of bolts ) out.

Does this soudn about right?

Things seem to be going ok for now, but as someone else said if I need to ride switch I may have a hard time.

I dont mind changing settings, but both the places I go dont allow equipment inside, and I really dont want to play around with the stuff in the cold. It's been like 20 for a high normally with blowing wind which makes it around ZERO. Not bad until you are fuddling around with stuff. Guess I could try though and see how it works out
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Old 01-16-2011, 04:56 AM   #6 (permalink)
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There are so many opinions as to the best way to set up your stance, but here are a few pointers that may help you.

I had been riding using duck stance of about 12deg on both and using the about shoulder width apart for width advice for about 5 years, when i decided to go get trained as an instructor (BASI - British Instructors Course)

The first thing my trainer did was make sure everyone had the proper stance setup and i cant believe how much mine changed!

My instructor pretty much wrote the book on instructing (literally), and pretty much figured out boarding for himself right at the start of the snowboarding back in the day, so i figured he knew what he was talking about.

Basically the idea is all about stability. If you are riding with your feet too close together then you are not 'planted' enough and cant react to the forces generated when riding as well as a more neutral stable stance.

The way to figure this out is pretty simple. Jump off a chair and see where your feet land (angles) this is where your knee follows your foot angle naturally - anything else could cause injury. I guarantee you don't land with one foot following the other - its just not natural - its a start for binding angles. Also you wont land narrow either!!

Once you know your natural binding angle you can then look at your stance width. Its important to know your natural angles before you do this.

Using your natural angles stand nice and planted, feet about shoulder width apart and put most of your weight over your leading foot (left foot for regular - right for goofy) and see if your opposite leg is still bent at the knee - if it is then your stance is too narrow!

Move your stance wider and do the same until your opposite leg just about has some bend left in it making sure that both feet remain flat on the floor - and there you have your optimum stance. - You dont want to have a fully straight trailing leg - flex is our friend!

It may feel weird for a while, and it did for me - i guess my stance was moved a total of about 8 inches wider overall, and my first few runs i was all over the place, but after about an hour i could tell the change made all the difference in the world.

I felt so much more stable and able to turn better, carve harder, and float better in the powder - i cant tell you the difference its made.

As for angles - i ride duck stance 15 deg on both feet as thats what my body naturally does - i feel comfortable and never at all twisted.

Hope this helps.
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Old 01-16-2011, 10:31 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Jump off a chair and see where your feet land (angles) this is where your knee follows your foot angle naturally - anything else could cause injury.
Interesting methodology. It sounds reasonable.

I have a question regarding finding your ideal foot angle. After you have jumped onto the floor and have allowed your feet to find their natural angles, do you have some way of objectively measuring the actual angles or are you just looking down to see how your feet look then trying to approximate those angles on the board (i.e., back to trial and error)?
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Old 01-16-2011, 11:59 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Interesting methodology. It sounds reasonable.

I have a question regarding finding your ideal foot angle. After you have jumped onto the floor and have allowed your feet to find their natural angles, do you have some way of objectively measuring the actual angles or are you just looking down to see how your feet look then trying to approximate those angles on the board (i.e., back to trial and error)?
funny, when I first read this I thought it was to gauge width



yea this is interesting
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:32 PM   #9 (permalink)
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It is more to do with stance width, but trying to see where your feet line up with your knees when naturally jumping helps when you start to set up your stance. Its not scientific, you just have to gauge where they are. You don't really have to jump off a chair to see that when you stand with a good solid stance your feet wont face forward, they will be pointing out! Jumping off a chair just helps you understand your bodies own mechanics.

Binding angles are something you have to experiment with. I start beginners off at either 12deg or 15 deg (equal duck) whichever feels most comfortable.

i had one older gentlemen who had ridden before, insist i set him up with his back foot at 0 unfortunately he wasn't able to move on as easily as the others in the group, and looking at his riding i put it down to his angles, but he insisted on keeping it the same way.

Ultimately, if you are comfortable, there is no wrong way! If you get from the top to the bottom, and have the best time ever, who cares how you ride!!!

I just figure if you are like me, any advantage is a good thing, and I've seen countless happy faces at the end of a weeks instruction because they learned a new skill and actually understood how they actually got their board to do what they wanted... safely!

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Old 01-16-2011, 05:53 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
Interesting methodology. It sounds reasonable.

I have a question regarding finding your ideal foot angle. After you have jumped onto the floor and have allowed your feet to find their natural angles, do you have some way of objectively measuring the actual angles or are you just looking down to see how your feet look then trying to approximate those angles on the board (i.e., back to trial and error)?
I agree, but that makes sense in case of a jump....I go from +18 + 12 in a fast carve day, to a much more comfy + 15 + 6on a powder day...I generally keep focusing on what angles are more fitting with the riding style of the day, and the position I will be all day.
YThen if you mostly jump or do park, that method might be the deal
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