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Old 03-09-2011, 05:52 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default raygun VS www rocker VS parkstar

Hey all,

i'm looking for advice for which one of these boards I should get. I'm a beginner with 2 weeks experience, and looking for something mainly for the mountain to begin with, and to take me through my progressive stage. i need to have something forgiving, that will stop me from catching an edge and will be easy for a beginner. But also looking at the possibility of learning some jumps and buttering in the future while on the mountain. My learning priorities are:

1. Learn to ride better down the mountain, practising linking turns as they are sloppy, pick up speed and confidence
2. Learn to ride switch to the same standard I can ride regular
3. Pick up buttering, all that 360ing down the hill looks FUN!
4. Start learning jumps on the mountain, maybe some tricks.

From my limited understanding, this is the rough jist of these 3 boards, but correct me if i'm wrong:

Raygun - Best for all mountain, stiffer of the 3, and not as good for jumps/butter as parkstar/www, setback stance could make learning to ride switch more tricky, this has put me off a little bit.

WWW Rocker - Park only board, the most flexible of all 3. Best for jumps/butter. Will this mean that it'll completely suck on the mountain? I like the sounds of this board the most, as it sounds the most fun, easiest to learn on and the most forgiving etc.

Parkstar - Somewhere inbetween the two. Good for both park and mountain, but not better than the raygun for all mountain, and not better than the www for tricks/butter.

So can anyone shed a little light on how correct my assumptions are on these 3 boards, and what would be the best board for me. I'm 5'10 and weigh roughly 132 pounds, or 60KG, and have size 8 boots.

I also demo'd the raygun 159 from TSA in xscape which was fun, but think it was too big for my size, felt stiff to me, but could just be that I hadn't snowboarded in a while. and I haven't got anything to compare it to

Thanks!
Ellhans

Last edited by ellhans; 03-09-2011 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 03-09-2011, 07:20 AM   #2 (permalink)
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The Raygun is the stiffer board of the three, but it's not stiff by any means of the definition. In reality, it's just a little stiffer than the Parkstar.

Raygun = Mid flex

Parkstar = Mid-soft flex

WWW = Borderline noodle

The Raygun 159 felt stiff because you are underweight for that size. You should be on the 153. Also, if you don't already know how to ride switch, learning is going to be difficult regardless of whether or not the board is a directional one. Will a true twin make switch riding easier? Yes, but it doesn't make a huge difference. What matters most is not the setback stance, it's the shape. Trust me, you're not going to notice the difference between a true twin or a directional twin while riding switch since you are learning.

With that said, the downside of the Raygun in terms of riding switch is the camber profile. The nose has a higher rocker than the tail so this will make switch perform quite differently because you'll end up with more rocker in the rear. Again, nothing you'll notice anyway considering you are still learning. If anything, learning switch on this board will make you a better switch rider. I learned switch on a true directional board and I'm much better now. So now I can ride switch on a directional or a true twin. I'm can't ride both sides equally yet, but I'm decent.

Honestly, I think the Parkstar or Raygun is your best bet. Forget the WWW. It's not going to do anything well outside of the park. The Raygun will be the better all-mountain board while the Parkstar will be the better freestyle board. Neither are stable on steep runs so keep that in mind.

If you are dead set on learning park very soon, go with the Parkstar. It will last longer for you in that case. If you want to do all-mountain freestyle, get the Raygun. Parkstar has a sintered base while the Raygun has extruded. Raygun in 153 or Parkstar in 152.

K2 Raygun Snowboard 2011

K2 Parkstar Snowboard 2011
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Old 03-09-2011, 07:59 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Excellent, thanks for the quick reply.

How would you rate the K2 parkstar for a beginner then? Does it have all the features to make it a forgiving board? you said it had a sintered base, how often do you need to wax these, and would you cause any damage if you didn't wax it? I heard that extruded don't need waxing that often which seems quite attractive to me,

Thanks
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:26 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Grrr.... I really hate when people give that advice to beginners. Extruded bases not needing wax is a misconception. The reason people love to say that is because an unwaxed extruded base is faster than an unwaxed sintered base. However, both fully waxed, a sintered is much, much faster. So I ask you this... how many people with sintered bases do you know don't wax their board often? If you want the most speed out of your extruded base, you will actually need to wax it more often than a sintered one. Heres why: Sintered bases absorb wax much better than an extruded. You can get a couple of good days on a waxed sintered before having to rewax. A waxed extruded base will be dry after one session and possibly even before your session is over depending on conditions.

With that said, the biggest benefit of extruded bases is the easy and cheap repair. Extruded bases are low maintenance in this respect. You'll notice that the majority of jib boards have extruded bases. The easy repair aspect is the reason why.

The Parkstar is definitely beginner friendly thanks to the rockered tips. It also doubles as a park board for advanced riders. It's mainly a good jump board.
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:37 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I'm highly considering this board now. I have a few more questions.

1. How easy do you think this board will be to ride for a beginner in comparison to the other two? Harder, easier?
2. When both waxed, how much faster would a sintered base be than an extruded base?
3. How easy is it to apply wax yourself, do you need any special tools? Does old wax need removing before applying a new coat?
4. How much would having a wax cost in a snowboard shop generally?

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Old 03-09-2011, 11:13 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellhans View Post
I'm highly considering this board now. I have a few more questions.

1. How easy do you think this board will be to ride for a beginner in comparison to the other two? Harder, easier?
2. When both waxed, how much faster would a sintered base be than an extruded base?
3. How easy is it to apply wax yourself, do you need any special tools? Does old wax need removing before applying a new coat?
4. How much would having a wax cost in a snowboard shop generally?

First off, the Parkstar is probably fine, but why are you limited to just K2? There are a lot of other great boards to consider. But, if you like the Parkstar, it's probably a good choice.

1. I don't really know, but it's probably a little easier than the Raygun which I've ridden, but I can't speak to the WWW.
2. It's noticable for sure, but not a deal breaker for a beginner or even intermediate. I wouldn't be that concerned about it for your first board.
3. Waxing your board is super easy (I just waxed two last night). There are some good instructional videos posted in the sticky section of this forum (top of the forum). The basics you need are just an old iron, some wax, a scraping tool and scoth brite pads (spunges with the scratchy material on one side). You actually scrape all the wax off after it's applied so all you really do before applying a new coat is clean the board just to make sure there's no dirt on the base.
4. Depends on the shope, but it would probably be at least $15-$20, maybe a little more. To me, it's not the cost, but the hassle of leaving my board at the shop for a day or two. It's much nicer to do myself whenever I want. It takes about 1 hour in total, but some of that time is just waiting for the wax to dry. Pluse I feel like I do a better job than the shop....I baby my board until it's all nice an shiny...they just try to get it out the door.
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Old 03-10-2011, 01:55 AM   #7 (permalink)
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ugh I did my first wax job on my board for the first time and man the scraping took LONGGGG :P
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:13 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Thanks for the help guys xx. I have purchased the K2 parkstar 152 today, so hopefully it goes well. Will I need to wax it as soon as I get it? I'm really not looking forward to the waxing, but i guess it's something I'm going to have to do. Also, what bindings would you recommend someone like me for this board? I've been looking into K2 Formula's or Indy's, but I haven't rid either yet. I'm planning on trying them both at Hemel Hempstead this weekend if they have them in stock
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:20 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Don't worry about the waxing. You can at least ride it once before you wax it. I took my K2 Turbo Dream to Tahoe for three days on factory wax and I enjoyed it immensely.

Some people are just wax snobs and won't dare ride any factory wax. If you think you're a snob, then wax it. If not, just enjoy the shred and wax when dry.
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:30 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Ok will do! If there's already wax on it, then I'm happy to ride it. I've been looking at wax on ebay, and I've seen some 'rub on' wax. Does anyone have any experience with this, as this looks WAY more appealing since it's fast, and can be done anywhere, even on the slopes. Are there any disadvantages to this method, and what brands of wax are good and durable?
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