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-   -   What makes a board directional (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/3940-what-makes-board-directional.html)

FrankDaTank089 02-16-2008 04:10 PM

What makes a board directional?
 
I recently found out that my 08 forum recon was supposedly directional and not twin tips or whatever you call it. I ride regular and spend about half my time riding switch, so I was kinda shocked to find this out (for some reason when I bought it I was under the impression that it was twin tip.)

I just got through measuring the bottom at widest part of the tail and the nose and it seemed to be exactly the same, so I am guessing that isn't it.

Also, would it effect nose or regular manuals. because I can actually do nose manuals fine, its just hard for me to do a regular, and usually if I want to get higher up with my board, I do a nollie instead of a ollie because of the same reason. any ideas on this? Does it have to do with my directional board?

Metalhead505 02-16-2008 06:15 PM

Im not sure but I think twin tip means the front and back are the same width and curve as each other so they handle the same.

FrankDaTank089 02-16-2008 06:19 PM

well i know the width of my tail and nose at the widest points are the same. i am assuming that is it, because once it continues to the end of the board from that point, it dosen't really matter since those section hardly ever touch the snow.

and if that is it, how is my board directional?

Metalhead505 02-16-2008 07:04 PM

I have no clue, call the company or a dealer and ask them, they are sure to know.

yso 02-16-2008 07:11 PM

on a directional board the tip will be longer than the tail(measured from the inserts). there is usually a slight setback on the inserts and the sidecut. they can be ridden switch and if you aren't having issues with it then i wouldn't worry about it.

FrankDaTank089 02-16-2008 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yso (Post 35960)
on a directional board the tip will be longer than the tail(measured from the inserts). there is usually a slight setback on the inserts and the sidecut. they can be ridden switch and if you aren't having issues with it then i wouldn't worry about it.

well i was wondering if it would make a difference manualing, because i can much easier ride the nose in a mannual then the tail. and also, i usually do nollies, because of the same concept and get more air.

gdthomas 02-16-2008 08:30 PM

I think they call the recon directional twin tip. The length from the bindings to the end is longer at the tip than the tail but both are the same shape.

Grimdog 02-16-2008 09:28 PM

A directional twin would have a centered stance but the tail would be stiffer than the nose.

FrankDaTank089 02-16-2008 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grimdog (Post 35975)
A directional twin would have a centered stance but the tail would be stiffer than the nose.

that would explain why I can ride the nose easier.

SUPERGILDO 02-16-2008 11:17 PM

true twin has the same flex patterns back and front and centered stance.


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