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Old 09-11-2011, 11:08 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default What size board should I get?

Hey guys, the title says it all. What size board should I get?

height - 5'5
weight - 145
shoe size - 10
age - 14
style - park


I had pretty much the same specs last season, I was about 135 and 5'3. I was riding on a 142cm board. Even then, that board felt a little bit too small. Especially when I would do a board slide and my nose and tail would be touching the snow -_- My mom is bent on the fact that park = small board and refuses to believe that I need anything bigger than a 142cm. Lol my dad is on my side, but my mom is like "NO. YOUR WRONG." So anyway, who is right? Should I stick with my 142cm this season, or should I get something bigger? I ONLY ride park.

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Old 09-11-2011, 12:24 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by uh oh a virus 2 View Post
Hey guys, the title says it all. What size board should I get?

height - 5'5
weight - 145
age - 14
style - park


I had pretty much the same specs last season, I was about 135 and 5'3. I was riding on a 142cm board. Even then, that board felt a little bit too small. Especially when I would do a board slide and my nose and tail would be touching the snow -_- My mom is bent on the fact that park = small board and refuses to believe that I need anything bigger than a 142cm. Lol my dad is on my side, but my mom is like "NO. YOUR WRONG." So anyway, who is right? Should I stick with my 142cm this season, or should I get something bigger? I ONLY ride park.
Hi Virus,

Please post up your foot size as well. Height is not a factor in board sizing.

As we have written many times, tip to tip board length (ie 142 cm) is a commonly considered, but almost useless measurement. Why? Because the shape and dimensions of a board's raised tip and tail can vary greatly and have next to no impact on the way the board will ride. These variations may change the overall board length by as much as 7 cm without having any significant effect on performance.

Last edited by Wiredsport; 09-11-2011 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 09-11-2011, 12:48 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Hi Virus,

Please post up your foot size as well. Height is not a factor in board sizing.

As we have written many times, tip to tip board length (ie 142 cm) is a commonly considered, but almost useless measurement. Why? Because the shape and dimensions of a board's raised tip and tail can vary greatly and have next to no impact on the way the board will ride. These variations may change the overall board length by as much as 7 cm without having any significant effect on performance.
board length is a useless measurement?? huh.... to think for 20 years i have been paying attention to the length of board i have been riding/buying... what a waste....

seriously...... that sounds retarded. i know from the tone of your post you're going to tell him to concentrate on the board's effective edge, but that's just going to confuse the kid more...



your height is not the most important factor, but in some cases it absolutely does affect the size of board you should be riding. (think about stance options for a tall, skinny, light, lanky person for example)

i am 5'10", 145-150 and i ride a 155 in everything. if all i rode was park and didn't care about pow the smallest board i would ride would be a 151. you still need a nose and tail to pop off of, and a longer board (than a 142) will give you more control. without knowing your shoe size i'd say 149-151.... maybe even up to a 153 - you're gonna keep growing, even thru this season...
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:11 PM   #4 (permalink)
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board length is a useless measurement?? huh.... to think for 20 years i have been paying attention to the length of board i have been riding/buying... what a waste....

seriously...... that sounds retarded. i know from the tone of your post you're going to tell him to concentrate on the board's effective edge, but that's just going to confuse the kid more...



your height is not the most important factor, but in some cases it absolutely does affect the size of board you should be riding. (think about stance options for a tall, skinny, light, lanky person for example)

i am 5'10", 145-150 and i ride a 155 in everything. if all i rode was park and didn't care about pow the smallest board i would ride would be a 151. you still need a nose and tail to pop off of, and a longer board (than a 142) will give you more control. without knowing your shoe size i'd say 149-151.... maybe even up to a 153 - you're gonna keep growing, even thru this season...
Hi ShredLife,

Thanks for the comment. Buying by height is the most common reason that riders end up woith the incorrect board. On a positive, I do agree with you about the skinny kid but for a different reason. Stance options, do not travel uniformly with length. They vary greatly by brand, model, and model year.

We first published this in 1993 and it is still true today:

Where your nose is, does not determine what size of snowboard you should ride!

...or your chin, ears, shoulders or any other body part for that matter. These are the silliest rules for sizing boards that could possibly be imagined, and yet they persist. We hear new ones everyday, "my friend told me that a board should come to in between my chin and my nose." Why, are you planning to nibble on it? Buying based on these generalities is good way to end up with a completely inappropriate board. Why do such rules exist? It is due to the fact that finding the right board takes a bit of research and knowledge. The easy way, however incorrect, is much quicker. A snowboard reacts to only two factors, how much pressure is being applied to it (rider weight), and where that pressure is coming from (foot size and position). Boards are designed around riders of a certain weight range. The total weight range for a given board will be around 50 pounds (although manufacturers tend to exaggerate this range to make their products sellable to a wider variety of customers). Two men who stand six feet tall and whose noses are at identical heights, may be separated by 100 pounds of weight. This would change the boards that they should ride by two entire categories of stiffness and running length. You will also want to make sure that the board is appropriate for your foot size. Up to 1 centimeter of barefoot overhang for both the toe and heel sides (yes, overhang) off the edge of your board is ideal (when measured at the stance width and angle that you will ride). We will discuss this more below when we address width in detail.

Buying by length is the hardest way to end up with the right board!
"My last board was a 156, and I liked it, so tell me about the 156's that you carry." The trick here, is that two boards of identical length, may be designed for completely different riders and types of riding. For example a 156 may be a "big mountain board" for a small rider, or a "park" board for a big guy, depending on the manufacturer's design plan. Those two boards, however, would never be appropriate for the same rider. Length is often discussed in terms of: longer equals faster, and more stable, while shorter equals more maneuverable. This can also be deceptive. The "running surface" of a board (the base area that contacts the snow) is a useful measurement, because this is the amount of board that you actually are riding upon. The overall length (the measurement usually considered) can be misleading, as it also contains the raised tip and tail, which do not contact the snow, and have only nuance differences in affecting your ride. Your best bet is research. Look into who the board was made for, and for what type of riding. Leave the rules of thumb to the rental guys, who are trying to get through the line of renters as quickly as possible, and get on the slopes (can't blame 'em for that).

Last edited by Wiredsport; 09-11-2011 at 01:15 PM.
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:23 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Hi ShredLife,


Buying by length is the hardest way to end up with the right board!
"My last board was a 156, and I liked it, so tell me about the 156's that you carry." The trick here, is that two boards of identical length, may be designed for completely different riders and types of riding. For example a 156 may be a "big mountain board" for a small rider, or a "park" board for a big guy, depending on the manufacturer's design plan. Those two boards, however, would never be appropriate for the same rider. Length is often discussed in terms of: longer equals faster, and more stable, while shorter equals more maneuverable. This can also be deceptive. The "running surface" of a board (the base area that contacts the snow) is a useful measurement, because this is the amount of board that you actually are riding upon. The overall length (the measurement usually considered) can be misleading, as it also contains the raised tip and tail, which do not contact the snow, and have only nuance differences in affecting your ride. Your best bet is research. Look into who the board was made for, and for what type of riding. Leave the rules of thumb to the rental guys, who are trying to get through the line of renters as quickly as possible, and get on the slopes (can't blame 'em for that).[/B]

for fucks sake no one is telling anyone to just run out and buy any old board just because its a certain size. ALL board companies have spec sheets on their boards that make note of the flex pattern of each board and what each model was designed for. ALL board companies list their overall length. pretty much all of them list effective edge.

does any board company list "running surface" of the base? wtf??

longer DOES equal faster.... shorter IS more maneuverable.

that whole 2nd paragraph is bullshit semantics that do not have any base in the reality of what a customer actually goes thru in their decision of what board to buy. if you're in retail - of snowboards - you should know this. come back to reality.
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:35 PM   #6 (permalink)
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for fucks sake no one is telling anyone to just run out and buy any old board just because its a certain size. ALL board companies have spec sheets on their boards that make note of the flex pattern of each board and what each model was designed for. ALL board companies list their overall length. pretty much all of them list effective edge.

does any board company list "running surface" of the base? wtf??

longer DOES equal faster.... shorter IS more maneuverable.

that whole 2nd paragraph is bullshit semantics that do not have any base in the reality of what a customer actually goes thru in their decision of what board to buy. if you're in retail - of snowboards - you should know this. come back to reality.
Hi ShredLife,

We will have to disagree. It will likely be possible for us to keep it friendly, we are just talking boards here.

Yes, some companies list running surface (AKA contact length) They all used to (read below). All Mervin brands still do (for instance). Kindly have a peak a the Gnu site spec sheet. Take the Carbon Credit for example. Between 153 cm and 162 cm the stance widths are the same for all 4 sizes (20.25 to 25). The tall skinny kid can *always* find even an ultra-wide stance option in an appropiate running length in all major brands.

Here is our full article on running length. All of your comments are addressed:

Board sizing has always been a little tricky, but in the past, there have been a small group of readily available stats that have been very useful for comparison and selection by knowledgeable riders. One of those has been Running Length (AKA Contact Length). As we have written many times, overall board length is a commonly considered, but almost useless measurement. Why? Because the shape and dimensions of a board's raised tip and tail can vary greatly and have next to no impact on the way the board will ride. These variations may change the overall board length by as much as 7 cm without having any significant effect on performance. I can feel some readers out there bristling to say, "but length effects spin weight and rotation". Sure, but in reality the difference in weight is negligible, and the difference you feel in spins is minor at best...and, most importantly for this article, tip to tip length will always be provided, so if it is important to you, it will always be available. Most informed boarders have paid little to no attention to overall (tip to tip) length but have focused on Running Length as a major indicator of a board's true "size". This measurement was highly valued as it gauged the amount of board that would be in firm contact with the snow while riding. The running length was typically taken as a straight line measurement between the two contact points, which on traditional cambered boards pretty well corresponded with the board's wide points at both ends of it's effective edge. So, this really became a wide point to wide point measurement. Some manufacturers would measure this with the camber compressed (weighted) while others would take a non compressed measurement. In either case, the numbers were pretty close. Good retailers kept their own consistent internal measurements.
Enter Rocker. Rocker is an often incorrectly used term that inaccurately groups about twenty different variations on Reverse Camber designs. One confusing factor that stems from the addition of "Rocker" boards is that due to the design of many of theseshapes, the tip and tail, when weighted, are not in contact with the snow. So, how is running length being measured for Rockered boards? Well, that's interesting. For the mostpart, it's no longer being measured at all. Manufacturers that have been providing this measurement for years and in some cases decades, are now excluding the measurement from their literature and websites. Others have simply continued to measure wide point to widepoint, even while this is no longer a true representation of contact length. Our suggestion: Two separate measurements. The fist being true weighted contact length and the second being the wide spot to wide spot measurement. This will allow the knowledgeable board seeker to get an idea of real running length, plus "available" running length (available by selective pressuring, even if not all at once) and wide spot distance to better gauge where the potential catch spots are in relation to rider stance.
But at least for now, Running Length, R.I.P.

Last edited by Wiredsport; 09-11-2011 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:31 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Sorry guys, didn't know shoe size mattered for the board. I am a size 10.
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:42 PM   #8 (permalink)
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if you're a size 10 it doesn't. just don't get a board designated as wide - that's for once you get up to 12+ in bootsize
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:44 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Sorry guys, didn't know shoe size mattered for the board. I am a size 10.
Perfect. If you can, please let us know what make, model and year the 142 was from last season and if you are considering a specific deck (or group of decks) let us know about that as well.

a shoe size of 10 will matter a lot if you are considering boards that are at the very small end of (or below) your range.

Thanks!

Last edited by Wiredsport; 09-11-2011 at 02:49 PM.
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:51 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Perfect. If you can, please let us know what make, model and year the 142 was from last season and if you are considering a specific deck (or group of decks) let us know about that as well.

Thanks!
I had a 2010-2011 Nitro Swindle 142cm last year, and this year for bindings I am looking at the 2010-2011 Flux RK30's, and I don't know the name of the board, but I want the one that this guy has. I think it's the WWW but I have no clue. 1:04 - 1:12 has the best view of it.

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_zC7CdvYu4) if the video wont load

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