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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-14-2012, 04:37 PM Thread Starter
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Optimizing Setback

I originally posted this as a tag along to a NS Heritage review, but think it is a good question related to any board.

[I have a '11 Heritage and think it is great, though I can't compare it as I haven't been on a ton of different boards. I do have a question about the setback if anyone can help.

I believe it is listed as having .5" of set back, but with an equal binding placement based on the mounting holes it measures 1.5". Since there is no powder today and I wanted to practice riding switch more, I moved up my front binding one hole. So now I have a stance width of 23" c-c baseplate and a true overall .5" setback, although not equal positions based on the mounting holes.

Is a true measured .5" setback like my current position the intended setup on a board that is listed as having .5" setback? Or am I too far forward on the center of the rocker and side cut?]

The real question that carries over to any board is; if you are matching the listed setback to your board are you optimizing the true center of the rocker or camber as well as the side cut?
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-14-2012, 06:31 PM
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I don't know the Never Summer line well enough to tell you specific dimensions, but you're likely now forward of center. Manufacturers typically center the hole pattern over the sweet spot on the board. An offset is also measured with respect to the running length, not the overall length. Another common mistake is how you measure this. It's probably easiest to look at the problem with respect to a 12in ruler. The center of the ruler is at 6in. If you move one direction from the center by 1/2in you will be at 5.5in or 6.5 in. You are now 5.5in from one end and 6.5in from the other. The difference is 1in, not 1/2 in. The same occurs with a longer device such as a snowboard. A 1/2in offset will result in a 1in difference in the distance from one end to the other. If you are making your measurements from the ends of the board, a difference of 1.5in is easily explained as well. A directional board typically has more material off the ground or in the nose than the tail. It sounds like the NS you have has a shovel that is 1/2in longer than the tail.

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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-14-2012, 06:49 PM
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PNW: I have the '10 Heritage, and I have my front binding about 1/2" forward of where it should be if I was to adhere strictly to the specs. I did this because that gives me a comfortable stance (amazing how much of a diff 1/2" makes). I think that stance width takes precedence over specs. You can move bindings 1/2" at a time by changing the binding plate position, or 1" (IIRC) at a time by picking the next hole position. If you go "off-centre" by moving your back binding back, you get a longer nose than tail which is great for powder. If you move your front binding forward, you get a more centered board which is better for riding switch. I think when we're talking 1/2" at a time, it's probably not a big deal.


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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-15-2012, 04:33 AM
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^yup...that's why you'd have a tool/screw driver...5-10 min minor adjustment per your preference and/or snow conditions.


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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-15-2012, 09:55 PM
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Set back is calculated from the effective edge. Some directional boards will have a "tighter" curve on the tail, so that the distance from the effective edge to the tail tip will be shorter than effective edge to nose tip.

I always center my bindings on the inserts.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-15-2012, 10:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingkoajmr View Post
Set back is calculated from the effective edge. Some directional boards will have a "tighter" curve on the tail, so that the distance from the effective edge to the tail tip will be shorter than effective edge to nose tip.

I always center my bindings on the inserts.
Reverse VSR sidecuts are sometimes used, but it has little to do with setback. You can learn a lot more about sidecut shapes here:
A physics lesson about Snowboard turn shape: Part 1 - YouTube
part 2:
A physics lesson about Snowboard turn shape: Part 2 - YouTube

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