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Old 03-09-2012, 05:24 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
Just playing the devils advocate here. What's wrong with your Custom X? What about a new one?
Well, for one, my current board is pretty beat to hell. I like riding trees and doing tree jimbs so my board has hit its fair share of trees.

I'm looking at the custom flying-v, just failed to mention it, but I'm definitely looking at a reverse camber or hybrid type of board so not the camber custom x. I've tried a couple of reverse/hybrid camber boards for quick runs (switching with friends) and I really like they way they ride, and had more fun with them than on my custom. That, and the beat up board, is what is finally getting me to buy a new deck.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:32 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Gotta say, all that fancy "fluff" mentioned does actually make riding more fun for me. Don't discount it.
The trouble is there's so much fluff out there now it's hard to know what's a marketing gimmick and what's actually worth having on your board. Like base profiles. Some companies make it sound like a rocker board is so easy that anybody will be able to learn to turn the thing (while at the same time insinuating that camber is the devils curve). Some people swear by the various multi-contact edge points, while I've read some very convincing evidence that you're better off with the longest piece of single edge you can get on the ice. Bindings that flex back and forth like skateboard trucks? I'm not skateboarding and I'm not on asphalt, I don't want anything on my board to flex that wasn't intended to.

I'm sure I seem like a bit of an old fart in most of my posts making fun of the current trend of board tech, and I don't mean to sound like I'm stuck in my ways, but again I go back to competition. What are the guys using to win medals and make money with their boards? If you look at slopestyle/jumps/pipe/etc. you'll find a mixed bag of all different types of boards and board tech. But if you look at downhill racing or boardercross, where they are judged by a watch instead of a panel of subjective judges, then you'll see people riding things that are much more traditional. Directional boards, a good helping of camber, regular edge profiles, etc.

Not saying that you (graft) or I are prepping for the races, and I agree it's all about having fun, but for the OP that's looking for something to handle the steep and deep, I'd be looking at what the competition is using. If crazy base profiles and wavy edges were truly better, we'd see the boardercross guys using them.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:34 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SnowDawg View Post
I'm looking at the custom flying-v, just failed to mention it, but I'm definitely looking at a reverse camber or hybrid type of board so not the camber custom x. I've tried a couple of reverse/hybrid camber boards for quick runs (switching with friends) and I really like they way they ride, and had more fun with them than on my custom. That, and the beat up board, is what is finally getting me to buy a new deck.
Fair enough... if you've tried the non-traditional boards and liked them no worries. Just out of curiosity have you tried a new Custom X? Just want to compare apples to apples methinks. But I'm fucked I like to over-analyze things.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:43 PM   #14 (permalink)
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The trouble is there's so much fluff out there now it's hard to know what's a marketing gimmick and what's actually worth having on your board.
Nah it's not that difficult at all. That's what this forum is for. We've got advanced riders and instructors (ie, not me) here that are happy to and do give both opinions and reviews on boards with all kinds of new tech

Yeah maybe don't be an early adopter, but there is a ton of stuff that is well established and easy to find solid unbiased info on.
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:31 PM   #15 (permalink)
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My handle describes my stature in life, not my years of riding experience. Let's just say that I did not start riding until rather late in life and have been rinding for only three seasons now.

In that short period of time, I have had experienced a minimal cross section of boards, but here is my two cents worth. Take all of this knowing that I do not spend any time in the Park. I ride trails almost exclusively, but will wander off in search of "fresh" from time to time. I have never ridden a dedicated "Park" board, so I know nothing of the boards of that persuasion. I am 6 feet / 200 lbs.

My first board was a entry level Elan. Fully Cambered. Directional. I am happy that I learned on a fully cambered deck as it rewards good riding technique. You cannot be lazy on a fully cambered board, especially at lower speeds, as bad technique will hook an edge and put you down faster than you can blink. A cambered deck rewards you with a very consistent carve at speed, stability at speed, is usually good on icy stuff and can pop you from edge to edge when your technique gets to that point.

I too wanted to experience all the hype about the "fluff" and my second board is a Rossignol Onemagtek. This deck has lots of bells and whistles. Cambered between the feet, rockered out to the tip and tail and it has Magnatraction. The profile is completely different from fully cambered. It is a much more forgiving ride at lower speeds as the rockered tip and tail greatly reduce the chances of hooking an edge. I ride on the ice coast, so I decided to give the MT a try and there is no doubt, it works. On hard pack, early morning groomers and any other icy variation, it provides an noticeable degree of grip that you would otherwise not have. However, as mentioned in a number of threads, in good conditions and softer, the MT can grab and not always in a consistent fashion. In softer conditions, one has to almost be more dialled into the board as it can sometimes "dig" in more aggressively than you might have wanted.

The hybrid profile on this Rossi is a nice balance of delivering the "exactness" of a fully cambered board, but the rockered ends are much more forgiving if you allow your technique to get a little more "relaxed". The rocker will also handle the powder better than a fully cambered board.

My third board, a Burton Barracuda, is again a hybrid profile with the board rockered from the front foot forward and cambered on the back two thirds of the board. I acquired this board as my powder board and it excels in the fresh stuff. The rocker in the nose & the taper provide it with great float. One can ride it on groomers, it will handle them fairly well albeit with a "looser" feel to it. It in no way can deliver the same exactness as a fully cambered board can, but remember a fully cambered board cannot deliver "float" like a rockered board can.

I have the luxury of a budget that allows me to have a quiver of decks. Most do not have that luxury, but are often asking on this forum, "What is the best board for me?". The best thing you can do to answer this question is to find a way to ride and experience the different board profiles. Ask a buddy to swap decks for half a day, rent something different and hit a demo day if you can. Do what you can to check out as much of the "fluff" as you can before turning over your hard earned cash on a board. You need to find out what type of ride appeals to you most. Many on this forum can & will provide you with review type information, but before you can use it, you need to know:

Are you a hard charging, exacting type of rider? Do you demand solid technique of yourself and like to work your ride, so to speak, then a fully cambered board is likely for you.

Do you like to carve often, see a lot of hard packed conditions, but like to be able to relax and not worry so much about hooking edges as you flatline back to the lift: then a hybrid camber might be your calling. MT is not a necessity, but if you can get a ride on a deck with it, you will quickly see what it is all about.

If Powder is your calling, a rockered or hybrid rockered board is what you want to explore.

As you read the reviews, remember what kind of rider you are. Please remember that all of my comments are from someone who spends ZERO time in the park.

Just remember: FULL CAMBER = Exactness & Technique FULL ROCKER = Very Loose, but excellent on Powder. All the HYBRIDS fall somewhere in-between.
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