Board suggestions Ė 6í2, 190 lbs - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-19-2012, 11:37 AM   #1 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 8
Default Board suggestions Ė 6í2, 190 lbs

Hey everyone! This is my first post so I apologize in advance for joining up just to ask questions at this point, but you guys seem to know your stuff when it comes to helping people find the right boards.

As the title says, Iím about 6í2 and weigh anywhere between 185 and 195 lbs. I just got new boots last season, size 11 or so Burtons that are great (Basketball boots), but Iíve been riding the same Morrow board (158 or 161, Iíll have to double check) since I was in college so itís going on about 7 years old. The bindings are just as old, Morrow as well and picked them up from a ski shop in Denver. Got a great deal, ended up being cheaper than renting for that trip so thatís what I have. I canít remember the model, but itís a pretty basic (non-rental!) board that from what I understand is pretty stiff but decent for what I ride.

As for experience, I get out to Colorado about once a year for the past 5-6 years and did a couple trips while I was in school too. We usually go about 4-5 days worth of riding each trip and hit a new place each trip. I stick mostly with the blue runs and blacks if I can find them without moguls, some powder, some trees, no pipe and always seem to crash out pretty hard in the terrain park so usually hit that once per trip. My fiancť skis so we usually stick together during the day

We just booked our plane and hotel for this December for Snowmass and since this is the first time weíve really done this so far in advance, I want to look into a new board before the trip. I tried my friends Skate Banana last season and aside from an awkward binding setup, it wasnít too bad. Iím up in the air on length (assume longer due to height and weight and lack of park time) and wondering about the wide vs. standard. I also stumbled across something from Burton last night about reverse camber that helps with fatigue, but donít know if thatís legit.

I donít have a set budget, but since I donít go out but one trip a season at this point, donít need to drop a ton of coin. Used works for me too, as long as itís quality and not beat to hell. Sorry for the long drawn out post, but want to make sure I cover everything. Thanks in advance for any help!!

-Adam
Muddy4DSM is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-19-2012, 11:45 AM   #2 (permalink)
TLN
Senior Member
 
TLN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Kazachstan
Posts: 336
Default

If you don't hit park i can say:
NS Rator X 164
or heritage if you prefer softer(but why you need that?
Ride SPI/Union Force.

YOu can get bindings on ebay(i've checked it recently), probably same for the board.
TLN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2012, 05:28 PM   #3 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 8
Default

Thanks for the quick reply. I may have found some UF bindings online, but not seeing anything great out there on that board. Will a 164 be a little long for trying to go through trees?
Muddy4DSM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2012, 07:49 PM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 45
Default

I'm 6'3, ~190lbs, size 12 boot, and get away with a 25.6cm waist width.
I don't think you'll need to go with the wider board option, but that's all dependent on the waist widths. There are a bunch of guides on the net as to the ideal waist width if you can't be bothered going into a store to get it checked out for yourself, so do that before looking at anything because you may end up disappointed...........
Otherwise you can do this;

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Boarder's Blog - Snowboard Width - Huh?

How wide of a snowboard do I need? Where is the width of a snowboard measured? What does width mean in terms of my boot size?

Letís start by talking about measurements, because this is where a lot of the confusion arises. The most common width measurement that is provided by manufacturers is "waist". The waist is measured at the narrowest point near the middle of the board (usually). But like with all things in snowboarding, different brands measure different things. Some measure the midpoint between the tip and tail and call that "waist". Others simply provide a measurement they call, "width", but do not really specify what width they are referring to.

If that has you a bit confused, don't worry, because regardless of where these "waist" measurements are taken, they are not very useful for what they are typically used for. Most people think that this measurement is a good indicator of what foot size a board will handle. It is not, and for a simple reason: you do not stand at the waist, you stand at the inserts. A board's waist measurement is always less than the measurement at the inserts and often the difference is significant. Additionally, two boards with the same waist dimension, may have very different measurements at the inserts, depending on each board's sidecut. Measurement at the center insert is a much better way to compare boards for shoe size compatibility, but for some odd reason, manufacturers do not publish this info.

OK, so now we have told you why we think the commonly provided measurements are pretty silly, but what good does that do you? You still need to know how to figure out the correct width for your new board. Well, here comes. There are two easy steps to getting it right every time.

First, measure your bare foot. It is important that you do not try to use a boot size. It is also important that you measure in centimeters, because the board measurements that you will be comparing to will be in cm. Here is the method that we suggest:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters).

Second, measure the board you are considering. This measurement is easy. It should be taken at the inserts. Try to measure at the inserts that you will be using to achieve your stance position. If you are unsure about this, simply measure at the center of the insert cluster (that will still be very close). Be sure to measure using the base of the board, not the deck. This is important because the sidewalls on many boards are angled in, and will therefore give you a smaller measurement on the deck than on the base. For our example's sake, let's say the measurement is 27.54 at the center insert.

Still with us? You are almost done. You now have a way to compare foot size to board width where it matters, but how do you interpret this info to get the correct width? Well that depends a little on stance angle. If you ride a 0 degree stance, you will want your foot size to be the same as the width of the board at the inserts or up to 1 cm greater. If you ride at an angled stance, you will want to measure the board across at the angles that you will be riding. Again, you will want your foot to at least match this measurement or exceed it by up to 1 cm. So using our example above, this guy has a foot 28.57 cm that exceeds the board with at the inserts 27.54 cm by 1.03 cm at a zero degree angle. But, when he angles his feet to the 15 degree angles that he rides, voila, he has .10 cm of overhang for a perfect fit.

But wait a second. Are we saying that you should have overhang, even with bare feet? Yes. You will need overhang to be able to apply leverage to your edges and to get the most out of your board. 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch of boot overhang for both toe and heel is ideal, and will not create problematic toe or heel drag. Remember that boots typically add 1/2 at both the toe and heel to your foot measurement from above, due to padding, insulation and the outer boot materials. We do not suggest using the boot length to size boards though, as the extra padding etc, cannot be used well to create leverage, that has to come from your foot itself. We highly recommend that riders do not choose boards where their feet do not come to or exceed the real board width.

OK, that's all well and good, but where can you get the information on board width at the inserts if the manufacturers don't provide it? That's easy. Email the store that carries the board(s) that you are considering. Give them your foot length in cm (and your stance width and angles if you know them). They will be able to provide you with the width at the inserts that you will be using and can factor in your stance angle as well to get you the exact overhang that you will have with bare feet.

PS:

Once mounted, the best way to test is to put your (tightly laced) boots into your bindings and strap them in tightly. It is important that you have the heel pulled all the way back into the bindings heel cup or the test wonít help. On a carpeted floor place your board flat on its base. Kneel behind the heelside edge and lift that edge so that it rests on your knees and so that the toeside edge is angled down into the carpet. Now press down with both hands using firm pressure, one hand on each of the boots. This will compress the board's sidecut and simulate a turn on hard snow. You can change the angle of the board on your knees to become progressively steeper and you will be able to see at what angle you will start getting toe drag. You will want to repeat the test for your heelside as well. If you are not getting drag at normal turn and landing angles, then you are good to go.




PPS:

Also a note about boots: Boot design plays a big role in toe drag as does binding ramping and binding base height. Boots that have a solid bevel at the toe/heel drag less. Many freestyle boots push for more surface contact and reduce bevel. This helps with contact, but if you have a lot of overhang with those boots it hurts in terms of toe drag.

Now go ride!


This was posted by Wiredsports, and is an excellent guide to waist widths and board selection. Good luck!
saudade101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2012, 09:50 PM   #5 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Soulace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 29
Default

If you are ok with used gear, then check the forums on here, and also check out geartrade.com (probably my most favorite discovery since butterscotch pudding)
Soulace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 12:27 AM   #6 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 24
Default

Lol i am 6'3 180 and pretty much want to know same thing as OP

Edit: will make my own thread as i do not want to hijack your thread.

Last edited by Weezy32; 09-20-2012 at 12:34 AM.
Weezy32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 01:52 AM   #7 (permalink)
TLN
Senior Member
 
TLN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Kazachstan
Posts: 336
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddy4DSM View Post
Thanks for the quick reply. I may have found some UF bindings online, but not seeing anything great out there on that board. Will a 164 be a little long for trying to go through trees?
I'm 6'5 and about 230 lbs with US 13 foot.
I'm running Never summer Legacy 174 board with 27.0 waist.
Trees, jumps, carved turns. no problem at all. I think it's now the board, but skills.

If you not hitting the park or rails, and you're a bit less 200 lbs, grap Raptor X, that's stiff board, with lots of energy in. Once you learn how to push this in caved turn you'll get way more fun, compared to softer boards. And it's stiffness won't be a problem in a trees or powder.
With US11 foot, i see no reason getting a regular width board, on a wide one, you'll be more comfortable + extra float in pow.

Check out videos: Keep in mind, that it's 174 board.

TLN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 09:02 AM   #8 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 8
Default

Well I took your advice and pulled the trigger on some neon green/yellow Union Force bindings this morning. I you had suggested it and from the tons of positive reviews I read I figured they couldn't be a bad way to go. I I did a little research on my board and found out it is a Morrow Blaze 158.
Muddy4DSM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 09:19 AM   #9 (permalink)
TLN
Senior Member
 
TLN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Kazachstan
Posts: 336
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddy4DSM View Post
I I did a little research on my board and found out it is a Morrow Blaze 158.
Don't ever buy this =)
Get a normal board. Do some more research and get a never summer, ride or whatever.
TLN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 09:25 AM   #10 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 8
Default

Too late, that's the board I bought in 2005 as my cheap beginner board. That and bindings cost me like $150US and lasted me til now. I'm sure you can see why I would be interested in upgrading, haha!
Muddy4DSM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:17 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums