Interested in learning to snowboard - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-01-2012, 12:32 PM   #1 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5
Default Interested in learning to snowboard

Hi all new to the forums and has some questions about snowboarding. First off a little history. My current job that ive had for the last 13 years or so is a seasonal job that just happens to have me laid off in the winter. Now I have been looking for a recreational activity to do while being laid off. I decided I would take a look at snowboarding. There is alot of information on the web to the point that it is almost overwhelming. Anyway i see alot of places say dont buy, rent or use demo boards. The problem for me is the distance i have to trave to a rental place and mountain. There is alot of back country options where i live. Im 5'8" and about 205 lbs boot size 10-10.5 ive been looking at a used never summer premier 159cm they are asking about 259$ for it and it has flow m11 bindings. I dont know the year of the board or binding but they look to be in great shape. would this be a good board to attempt to learn on. Any advice would be great. Thanks!
Lookingtolearn is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-01-2012, 03:17 PM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Gustov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 207
Default

that would be a terrible board to attempt to learn on. seriously. and hiking up some backcountry is not a good way to try to learn. i guess you could hike a little hill and not be in danger or anything, but it's probably not going to be very enjoyable. rental and a lesson is what everyone will tell you to do.
Gustov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:27 PM   #3 (permalink)
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Mountains
Posts: 10,050
Default

Yeah hike that backcountry remember to test snow stability by walking out on cornices and jumping up and down. Don't forget that if the snow seems unstable you're golden.
__________________
Angry Snowboarder Because someone has to call it how they see it!
BurtonAvenger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
sabatoa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mid-Michigan
Posts: 1,971
Default

My advice is to get at least one actual lesson from a certified instructor.

I learned to ride a couple seasons ago. I went out, rented a board and got a lesson and poked around the bunny hill falling more than I rode.

I decided that I was committed to learning and so I bought a cheap ass board and practiced on local sledding hills around town whenever I had free time in addition to actual trips to a local rinky-dink ski area once I started getting a little better.

You're going to fall and bust your ass the first few times out. Know that. Accept it. You will get better if you keep at it.
__________________
'12 NS Legacy 163
Days on snow 2014/2015 season:
  • Boyne Highlands: 0
  • Boyne Mountain: 0
  • Mt Holly: 1
  • Mt. Brighton: 0
  • Caberfae Peaks: 0
  • Crystal Mountain: 0
  • Bittersweet: 0
sabatoa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:47 PM   #5 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustov View Post
that would be a terrible board to attempt to learn on. seriously. and hiking up some backcountry is not a good way to try to learn. i guess you could hike a little hill and not be in danger or anything, but it's probably not going to be very enjoyable. rental and a lesson is what everyone will tell you to do.
Can you tell me why this board would be horrible to learn on? And perhaps I should not have used the word back country i by no means would be hiking to a mountain top and jumping on cornaces
Lookingtolearn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:55 PM   #6 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
sabatoa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mid-Michigan
Posts: 1,971
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lookingtolearn View Post
Can you tell me why this board would be horrible to learn on? And perhaps I should not have used the word back country i by no means would be hiking to a mountain top and jumping on cornaces
That board is stiff and responsive (aka unforgiving).

They say that new riders should be on something softer and more forgiving.
__________________
'12 NS Legacy 163
Days on snow 2014/2015 season:
  • Boyne Highlands: 0
  • Boyne Mountain: 0
  • Mt Holly: 1
  • Mt. Brighton: 0
  • Caberfae Peaks: 0
  • Crystal Mountain: 0
  • Bittersweet: 0
sabatoa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:59 PM   #7 (permalink)
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,431
Default

If you want to ride on the cheap while you have no job:
1. Buy a used board. You should be able to score a decent board and bindings for $100-$200

2. Buy new boots. If you play to ride a lot then comfortable boots that fit you properly are more important than saving ~$80 on used ones.

Do you live close to a hill or mountain? Are you interested in/can you afford a season pass to one?

You don't really need a lesson to learn how to snowboard. It does make the process much easier, but if you're willing to put up with doing things the hard way and falling on your tuckus quite a bit then you will eventually learn the basics by observing people and emulating them.

My first snowboarding trip ever was with two skiers who had never strapped into a snowboard (meaning they were no help). I was so green that I had to watch people load onto the lift to figure out how I was supposed to do it.

Check out a few videos on drills for new riders and spend your days doing that until you figure out how to turn, stop, and keep the board pointed (more or less) how you want it.

Good luck!
__________________
Read on another forum: "If someone held a gun to my head and said, "You have to move to Salida tomorrow", I'd probably do it. If they told me I had to go to Breckenridge instead, I think I'd just let them pull the trigger."
Tarzanman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 04:11 PM   #8 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Gustov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 207
Default

like sabatoa said, that board is too stiff. i assumed you wouldn't be hiking up mountain peaks, but with the amount that you fall when you first start, not having a lift of any kind seems like it would be frustrating.

i know at the crappy local hill by me, beginner lessons are free with a lift ticket. i have never taken a lesson though, a lot of people don't. but whether you do or not, do internet research. watch youtube videos, and look in the tips section on this forum, it's very helpful.
Gustov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 04:18 PM   #9 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5
Default

thanks for all the information so far i appreciate it. I will certainly look into the cost of lessons at the mountains that are within driving distance and see what they are chargeing for lessons. Im sure that would be the best route to go. What about board length for learinging i know shorter and with more flex but what size would you put me on 5"8" 205lbs 10-10.5 boot
Lookingtolearn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 12:38 AM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
tigre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Valdez, Alaska
Posts: 161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lookingtolearn View Post
Hi all new to the forums and has some questions about snowboarding. First off a little history. My current job that ive had for the last 13 years or so is a seasonal job that just happens to have me laid off in the winter. Now I have been looking for a recreational activity to do while being laid off. I decided I would take a look at snowboarding. There is alot of information on the web to the point that it is almost overwhelming. Anyway i see alot of places say dont buy, rent or use demo boards. The problem for me is the distance i have to trave to a rental place and mountain. There is alot of back country options where i live. Im 5'8" and about 205 lbs boot size 10-10.5 ive been looking at a used never summer premier 159cm they are asking about 259$ for it and it has flow m11 bindings. I dont know the year of the board or binding but they look to be in great shape. would this be a good board to attempt to learn on. Any advice would be great. Thanks!
Wow, your situation sounds a lot like mine. I learned by hiking up backcountry "bunny hills" at the base of big mountains (well out of any avalanche runout zones) and riding one area all day until I completely tracked it out. Then the next day I'd find another spot, then another. It was a lot of hiking, and not really glamorous. For someone used to easy runs on a lift I guess it was a lot of work, and I wasn't making long runs or anything, but it was a hoot anyways and well worth the effort. The good thing about bootpacking shorter runs in the same spot is that the uphill gets easier after the first couple of runs, because you've built yourself a stairway (at least in our snow).

I guess lessons are a good idea; everyone says that anyways. But if it's completely impractical then just go out and try it. Find a decent board/bindings on Craigslist or on clearance somewhere, buy well-fitting boots (and snowshoes if you need them), and go play in the snow. I don't know how much it will benefit you to learn to ride groomed snow at a resort if you're going to ride mostly softer snow anyways. If you have any friends who know what they're doing and are halfway decent at teaching, ask them to come out with you and give you pointers. I'd also recommend reading something like Snow Sense, to give you some idea about safe and unsafe terrain and conditions. And read the local avalanche forecasts before you go out. Even routes that might seem safe can be dangerous in the wrong conditions (watch A Dozen More Turns for a good example of that).

Anyways, just wanted to give you some positive vibes and say that learning from some instructor on corduroy isn't necessarily the only way to do it. Read a bunch, watch some videos on technique, then go practice. You're trying to learn something, so it may sometimes feel like work. That's okay. It's worth it. Be honest with yourself while you're practicing. When you fall, think about why, then learn to fix the problem. Also, try to fall on your butt, not on your face. In powder that means always keeping the nose up.

Last edited by tigre; 10-02-2012 at 12:42 AM.
tigre is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:01 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums