should i buy a new board? - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-06-2012, 07:08 PM   #1 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
Default should i buy a new board?

Hello,

i started snowboarding last season. i bought a libtech banana experimental and used it about 5 to 6 times last season. the thing is that at high speed down the hill, the snowboard is a little bit unstable. i was wondering if the unstability come from the fact i am a beginner or because of the board which is more for freestyle riders.

should i buy a new board? if so, any suggestion. i was thinking about buying a freerider board, but all i read is that it's for powder and stiff. so i was wondering if it will be good to go the hill?

any suggestion of which board i should buy?

tks
ediway is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-06-2012, 07:41 PM   #2 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,966
Default

Keep the Banana.
hktrdr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 09:04 PM   #3 (permalink)
glm
Senior Member
 
glm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 137
Default

Definitely keep it. Most people say it's easier to learn on a softer board than a more rigid one, and that is a higher end board (although it may not have beginners especially in mind). Hell, I learned on a highly directional board backwards cause I had no idea you could turn snowboard bindings around (I knew little to nothing about snowboards then).

Maybe Snowolf or another instructor/expert type person could give a tip on this? Good luck learning and have a great time!
glm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 11:34 PM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
areveruz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Fitchburg, MA/Cape Cod
Posts: 222
Default

Forgive me for assuming, however I'm going to go with the assumption that you've only ridden that board which means you've only been 5 or 6 times. Frankly, I don't care who you are... after only five or six times, you're not going to be able to have enough board control to go "fast" enough for the board to be the problem. And that is by no means an insult in any way.
areveruz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 11:36 PM   #5 (permalink)
Banned!
 
snowklinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: L-Town
Posts: 5,028
Default

slow the fuck down, you aren't good enough to ride that fast safely.
__________________
Support Local Business
"Shop Smart. Shop S-Mart!" - Ash
snowklinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 11:06 AM   #6 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
Default

well, i took 3 hours of private lessons and only the first hour seemed to be worthy. The second and 3th one was almost useless.

After the first lesson, i took 2 days to train the basic (c turn). then i started to learn carving to get more speed (which was alright on green pist) but and on steeper slope i tend to put to much weight on my back foot which cause me to "drift" and slow down instead of having a nice curve.

so on the third day, i took a second hour lesson. i asked the instructor to teach me how to carve. And for the first run, he took me to the "bunny hill" (beginner), then seeing i was doing alright carving, he took me to another pist. The slope was pretty steep, and there were nobody on that slope, so there were a lot of snow (kind of tick layer of "fake snow"), which made it even harder to turn. all the guy did was going down half way then stop (he couldn't even see me anymore), then it was my turn. Because the slope was so steep and the layer of snow so tick i couldn't even make any proper turn. It was only at the end of the session that i went to check on the "trailer map" and saw that he took me to a black pist. Would he have taken me to a blue pist, i would have understood, but a black pist??? come on. it didn't seem that i learned anything.

after that i trained by myself and i am doing ok on blue trail (still can't carve on the black diamond slope, it's going to fast and i keep "drifting or falling"). Usually when going down, i never really go "straight", i always try to carve (so i am always using the edge of the board), but in narrow path, or at the bottom of the hill, i kind of have my board straight (and it is not necessarly always at high speed), and in this straight position when i switch from hill edge to toe edge, sometime for a few seconds my board lays flat and it's at those moments that i feel the unstability. if i don't pay attention it will follow by my "ass" on the ground. Each time that i have to stay straight i feel anxious because of that.

So i thought that if i get a "flatter" board (without the banana shape), it will be more stable.


on my third lesson because there again i asked the instructor to help me improve my carving, and all he did was saying: "you are doing alright, you are doing good". He didn't say anything that i already knew (either from the previous instructor or from beginner video on youtube). All i did was following him around for 1 hour on green and blue slope. He really didn't say much.

so i dont' think i will take any other lesson until i am ready to try to do some jumpings.

after that i trained by myself and i am doing ok on blue trail (still can't carve on the black diamond slope, it's going to fast and i keep "drifting or falling"). Usually when going down, i never really go "straight", i always try to carve (so i am always using the edge of the board), but in narrow path, or at the bottom of the hill, i kind of have my board straight (and it is not necessarly always at high speed), and in this straight position when i switch from hill edge to toe edge, sometime for a few seconds my board lays flat and it's at those moments that i feel the unstability. if i don't pay attention it will follow by my "ass" on the ground. Each time that i have to stay straight i feel anxious because of that.

So i thought that if i get a "flatter" board (without the banana shape), it will be more stable.

by the way,

i am 5.6, 120 lbs, my baord is a banana btx narrow 149 cm. i dind't consult anybody when buying my board. i didn't know anything about snowboarding (still don't know much). i just read some review, and checked on some "engine search" that give you the size of the board you should get depending on your weight and size.
ediway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 11:27 AM   #7 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,966
Default

Two words: Keep practicing.

More lenghty response:
I am not convinced (in fact, I seriously doubt) that you are actually 'carving'. It sounds like you are pretty proficient riding on an edge and controlling speed by side slipping - which is great for a beginner.
But you state that you have problems turning. That points to a technique issue, especially since you are riding on a soft, full rocker board that will start turning pretty much as soon as you think about it.
You should read snowolf's description of basic skidded turns and watch his videos. Then practice on runs where you are comfortable, paying particular attention to your technique. Continue to challenge yourself by gradually moving to more difficult terrain (steeper greens, blues, etc.).
Once you can get down blue runs linking turns without any problems, you should be able to at least navigate a black run - you might fall occasionally, mess up some turns, or have stop sometimes but that is ok, it is part of progressing.
Then you can also get into dynamic skidded turn and basic carves - but make sure to get the fundamentals down.

Back to your original question: Yes, any soft rocker board is going to feel less stable and more squirrel-ly when flat-basing. However, if you are having problems with this even at slow speeds and in relatively flat sections, then it is a rider/technique issue not a problem with the board.
hktrdr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:29 PM   #8 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
Default

i am not proficient yet at carving, but if it's a trail with a reasonable wide and decent slopes (generally green and blue trails), i have time to sync the coordination of my knees and i am able to do those carving.

However because i am carving i am taking too much speed, and at time if the slope gets too steep i tend to put too much pressure on my back heel which cause me to slide, but generally on green and blue i think i am doing alright.

Also when the piste is too narrow and/or too steep, i m still not proficient doing the carve because i need to switch turn too quickly and i need to push with my knees to help to make the turn. Because the rhythm is faster and i still lack coordination with the push of my knees, i end up putting too much pressure on my back leg and heel, so i tend to slide between a few carves.

But, yes you are right, i still lack techniques, that is why i usually never go straight when going down, still trying to improve those carves and trying to get a dynamic stance, but i still need to work on my knees.

But, yes you are right, i still lack techniques,
ediway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:41 PM   #9 (permalink)
Veteran Member
 
mixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: so cal
Posts: 616
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ediway View Post
should i buy a new board?

tks
how many days do you plan tor ride in the upcoming season?


Is there anything else you want or need that's the cost of the board?



Boards are a personal thing, I think. Everyone is different, likes different things and rides in different conditions.

Spend some time learning about different shapes and what not. Then, once you've completed your due dilligence go demo some boards. Then, you will quickly figure out what you like...For example I demoed a handful of boards and realized pretty quick what I liked and didn't like in regards to shape and stiffness.

Then, you can make a checklist and find a board(s) that satisfies your requirements and narrow it even further.

Tme consuming and expensive? Sure But buying the wrong board costs even more. Ask the shop if they will credit you back some or all of demo fee towards the purchase of a new board.
mixie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 01:03 PM   #10 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
Default

i am planning to go like 6 or 7 time this seasons. still in college, and homework are time consuming. can only go on saturday.

i read of few reviews on snowboard, freeriders, freestylers... but since i am just novice, i don't get all of the technical words....

Moreover, i am an student so kind of broke. i ll have to pay for a season pass (around 400$), so i don't want too spend too much to try many demo boards (don't know how much it costs). Of course, you are right, buying the wrong board will cost more. That is why i trying to ask advice on a snowboard to limit my cost. but i already knew that it wouldn't be an easy answer since everybody is different.

I was just wondering if it was the board due to the board or due to me that i feel that instability. But from the answers, i guess i am the cause. so i think i should just keep my board for this season and practice more.

will see if the instability still there or not after the end of this season.
ediway is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums