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Optikal_Illuzion 10-08-2012 09:11 AM

Question about my new board
 
I'm a relativly new female boarder, and I don't know much about all these new different types of technologies behind the boards. I started boarding a few years ago and didnt get a chance to go last year due to lack of snow and an injury. My last board was a full rocker by Lamar, and was a used board I got from my twin that was in decent condition. I spent most of my time on my butt so this year for my first new board I decided to get a moustache board with the cambers under my boots.

My question is: When I stand on my board, will my weight bring the cambers down to make it flat? And if so, does this mean theres more stored energy in the board for pops and jibs? When turning, does this means I will have uneven edge and more opportunity for catching it? If there's snow this year, I do plan on eventually trying park, but will probably stick to trils and groomers. This board I got is pretty flexible and very lightweight (total weight with boots and bindings on the board is about 17lbs) and made for women.

I probably should have asked this question before I got my board, but whatever :p ANY input will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!

EDIT: my bad, last board was a full camber, not a rocker....

KnoxBoarderX 10-08-2012 10:22 AM

Here is a good article discussing rocker vs camber For Those About To Rocker (We Salute You) - How To Choose The Right Rockered Snowboard

But a short answer is that yes, a full cambered board stores more energy. That results in more pop for jumps, more responsiveness in your turns. The bad parts of camber are that if doesn't float in powder like a rocker board. To get that float on a camber board, you need to set your stance back a bit. A camber is also harder to butter than a rocker board.

As for catching an edge, a camber board does increase the chances of catching an edge vs a rocker board. I started on a camber board and my second was a rocker. The difference to me was amazing. The rocker board was a lot more playful.

BigmountainVMD 10-08-2012 10:41 AM

Any type of "mustache" board will be somewhere in-between camber and rocker. Rocker boards have less spring like "pop" action, but the tips don't push as hard into the snow and are less likely to catch.

Likeliness to catch an edge and amount of pop:
rocker < mustache < camber

I usually recommend rocker boards to beginners who only ride a few times a year, because it increases your comfort level with turning. The downside to this is that you can develop sloppy technique easier, so once you want a new more intermediate/aggressive board it can make it a "relearning" experience. They also don't want to grip as well on ice, so if you are on the east coast, it may not be the best option.

Getting the mustache ride is the way to go (as I see you have done), because of the nature of the board, you will need better technique to turn it (though not as much as full camber, a nice happy-medium) and it grips a bit better on the ice, especially if it is a Gnu, Roxy or NeverSummer board, whose grip tech, IMO, is the best out there.

If you started on a camber board and you switched to a hybrid rocker/camber (mustache) board, you should notice it to be a bit easier to turn (assuming they are similarly sized) and it should float better in powder.

Optikal_Illuzion 10-09-2012 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigmountainVMD (Post 524320)

If you started on a camber board and you switched to a hybrid rocker/camber (mustache) board, you should notice it to be a bit easier to turn (assuming they are similarly sized) and it should float better in powder.

I started on a full camber, and had a hard time carving, and the board was not very flexible, and was only a couple cents shorter than my current board. I am an east coast rider, although hoping this season will bring alot of snow and less ice. I wanted a board that was more flexible and that could hold an egde on ice, but one that was easy to maneuver as well. Its my first board purchase and have only ridden used boards in the past.

The comments so far are very helpful thanks. I guess I should have gone for a bananna or rocker instead of the 2013 Womens Camp Seven Featherlite board. Here;s to hoping I win that contest so I can get a rocker to hold edge on ice!

timmytard 10-10-2012 01:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cypher_chik (Post 524914)
I started on a full camber, and had a hard time carving, and the board was not very flexible, and was only a couple cents shorter than my current board. I am an east coast rider, although hoping this season will bring alot of snow and less ice. I wanted a board that was more flexible and that could hold an egde on ice, but one that was easy to maneuver as well. Its my first board purchase and have only ridden used boards in the past.

The comments so far are very helpful thanks. I guess I should have gone for a bananna or rocker instead of the 2013 Womens Camp Seven Featherlite board. Here;s to hoping I win that contest so I can get a rocker to hold edge on ice!

Your board is a rocker board, it's a hybrid rocker.

Pretty sure the banana is full rocker? I haven't ridden a full rocker deck, but from what I've read, full rocker holds an edge the shittiest of the different types of rocker.

You got the best rocker profile, I do believe.

I was considering buying one of those boards & still might.
So I'm eagerly waiting for you to get a chance to ride that thing.
I wanna hear all about it.

Oh, & sign up for this. It's wicked, 30 free $40 gift certificates for tech shop service from Sportchek.
https://team.sportchek.ca/pages/form.jsp

TT

KnoxBoarderX 10-10-2012 07:30 AM

I have a full rocker board, and just like timmy said, it doesn't hold an edge as well as camber or a hybrid board. Taking what Bigmountain said, think of edge hold for boards like this: camber > hybrid > rocker.

I think the board you chose is a good choice since it will make carving a little easier, and you will be less likely to catch an edge vs a camber board. The board will also perform better on ice than a full rocker board.

Lamps 10-10-2012 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigmountainVMD (Post 524320)

I usually recommend rocker boards to beginners who only ride a few times a year, because it increases your comfort level with turning. The downside to this is that you can develop sloppy technique easier, so once you want a new more intermediate/aggressive board it can make it a "relearning" experience. They also don't want to grip as well on ice, so if you are on the east coast, it may not be the best option.

Getting the mustache ride is the way to go (as I see you have done), because of the nature of the board, you will need better technique to turn it (though not as much as full camber, a nice happy-medium) and it grips a bit better on the ice, especially if it is a Gnu, Roxy or NeverSummer board, whose grip tech, IMO, is the best out there.

There's definitely truth to the point above about relearning. I bought a mustache board 2 years ago and then went away for a week with it and my regular cambered board. Rode the mustache board on the resort where we got fresh snow for five days in a row and really enjoyed the looser, skatey feel and easy turns. Switched back on the last day to the cambered board as the snow conditions were more hard packed, and caught my edge a couple times in the first hour, typically on the flats. This was a combination of no fresh snow and the cambered board punishes laziness/poor technique.

Since I ride mostly in Ontario the cambered board works best out here on our average conditions of hard pack, ice, and crud. Those out west are so lucky with the quality snow you get. I ride the cambered board mostly when I'm here but on trips out west I don't use it much.

Optikal_Illuzion 10-10-2012 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lamps (Post 525094)
There's definitely truth to the point above about relearning. I bought a mustache board 2 years ago and then went away for a week with it and my regular cambered board. Rode the mustache board on the resort where we got fresh snow for five days in a row and really enjoyed the looser, skatey feel and easy turns. Switched back on the last day to the cambered board as the snow conditions were more hard packed, and caught my edge a couple times in the first hour, typically on the flats. This was a combination of no fresh snow and the cambered board punishes laziness/poor technique.

Since I ride mostly in Ontario the cambered board works best out here on our average conditions of hard pack, ice, and crud. Those out west are so lucky with the quality snow you get. I ride the cambered board mostly when I'm here but on trips out west I don't use it much.

Where in Ontario do you ride? HSV, SV, Blue and occasionally Moonstone here if I can get the time off work. I wanna head out to the mountains sometime, but I don't know anyone who'd like to go so we can split accomidations and such.

So you're saying I should have stuck with a cambered board even though I had a real hard time turning and catching edges? I wanted something looser and more flexible, and havent been able to find a cambered board that I like that fits that... or made for a woman... or in my budget for that matter.

Lamps 10-10-2012 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cypher_chik (Post 525300)
Where in Ontario do you ride? HSV, SV, Blue and occasionally Moonstone here if I can get the time off work. I wanna head out to the mountains sometime, but I don't know anyone who'd like to go so we can split accomidations and such.

So you're saying I should have stuck with a cambered board even though I had a real hard time turning and catching edges? I wanted something looser and more flexible, and havent been able to find a cambered board that I like that fits that... or made for a woman... or in my budget for that matter.

I ride mostly at blue, used to go primarily to moonstone.

I wouldn't overthink your decision, you've got the tradeoffs right, camber is a bit more demanding to ride but handles ice better. You made the right choice to make you riding more fun and catch edges less. Ride your new board for a while to get to know it, presumably you'll find it's looser, easier turning, and playful. And then on a demo day try out another cambered board or borrow or rent one, ideally when conditions are sub par. You can then decide how you want to manage that tradeoff. Lots of people run rockered boards in Ontario and are completely happy with it, they give up a bit of performance in crap conditions for more fun on average.

KnoxBoarderX 10-11-2012 07:20 AM

I agree with Lamps, you made the right choice. Easier turns, less edge catching, and it should handle decently on ice.


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