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Old 11-07-2012, 03:49 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Nivek View Post
Boards are made of natural materials. If you bought something from 2000 and literally never rode it today it would ride like poo. Board materials break down over time regardless of how often its been ridden. A 2005 that has been ridden at least 60 days is surely smooshy and dead.
I have a hard time believing this. The only natural material in a snowboard is the wood, and if wood broke down by just sitting there all our houses would fall over. The FG and resin aren't going to degrade noticably on a board that was bought and stored for ten years.

I'd be willing to bet that if I bought two identical boards today, and rode one this season, and put the second away in a closet for 10 years and brought it out for a season, that I wouldn't notice the difference.

Luckily I have no organic materials in my board so the fountain of youth it does not need...
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Old 11-08-2012, 02:01 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Hmmmm... Pretty much every aspect of board manufacture has changed in the past ten years. Resins are more durable, core materials and profiling are better engineered. Topsheets are thinner, lighter, and more durable. Edges are stronger, hold a longer-lasting edge, and are now often profiled for better edge hold in carved turns. Sidewalls are now engineered for dampening and improved edge hold. Basalt, Kevlar, carbon fiber, and bamboo inserts help to get more/better edge hold, power transfer, turn initiation, and pop. Camber profiles like RC, C2, Camrock, etc really do maintain hardpack carving ability while drastically improving float. Wax-infusion and molecular engineering of sintered base materials yields faster, more durable base materials. Progressive side cuts yield better turn initiation and cleaner carves.

Snowboards are now lighter, just as durable, better performing, and many are much more able to handle a variety of riding styles and snow conditions.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:01 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
I'd be willing to bet that if I bought two identical boards today, and rode one this season, and put the second away in a closet for 10 years and brought it out for a season, that I wouldn't notice the difference.
1) All materials undergo fatigue from stresses. Each and every flex wears on them.

2) Unless you're a delicate rider, you'll apply shocks to your board over and above simple fatigue occasionally. Those add up too.

3) If boards were totally and completely waterproof and watertight, it wouldn't matter. But over time seams will loosen, microfractures will form, and moisture will get into the core. I've had to replace ceiling rafters that got wet, so I know what moisture does to wood.

4) Volatiles gradually evaporate, which will result in man-made materials gradually becoming brittle.

5) Two words: Ultra-Violet light.

Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:21 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
1) All materials undergo fatigue from stresses. Each and every flex wears on them.

2) Unless you're a delicate rider, you'll apply shocks to your board over and above simple fatigue occasionally. Those add up too.

3) If boards were totally and completely waterproof and watertight, it wouldn't matter. But over time seams will loosen, microfractures will form, and moisture will get into the core. I've had to replace ceiling rafters that got wet, so I know what moisture does to wood.

4) Volatiles gradually evaporate, which will result in man-made materials gradually becoming brittle.

5) Two words: Ultra-Violet light.

Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
They don't evaporate, I'd bet in 500 years you could still tell it was a snowboard. I believe most manufacturers suggest to store board in a cool dry and out of the sunlight.
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:04 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
Yeah I wasn't talking about a board degrading over time while riding, I was talking about one degrading by just sitting in a closet for a long period of time.

If you buy two identical boards today, board A is used for this season, and board B is put in a closet for 10 years and then brought out, I highly doubt any of us would be able to tell the difference (if we could magically fast forward to ten years from now)...
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Old 11-08-2012, 01:09 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Well..
I just sold a guy a brand new never ridden 2002 Palmer Titanium Channel board that has been sitting in a closet for exactly ten years. I too just got one.

The guy I sold it to already has one & has been looking for another one for years. I'm just waiting on payment then I'll be shipping it out.

I guess I'll have to tell him I need a comparison of the two boards.
One has been ridden for ten years & the other has never been ridden.

I guarantee this guy will put it to the test, buddy is a hard booter.
I've been riding for 25 years & have never tried the hard boot thing yet.
& as gay as most people here might think that is, if you've ever seen someone doing it, they put a lot more stress on a board.

I have a feeling they will be exactly the same.

The new one I have(actually I have 2 brand new ones) are stiff as fuck, I don't think I've ever flexed a board this stiff, both seem to flex the same.
To the eye, they both have the same amount of camber.

I have an old K2 that is pre 4 hole pattern, so sporadic holes.
It has tonnes of camber.

TT
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