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Old 11-06-2012, 04:06 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Snowboard Technology

Right now I have a forum JP walker from 2005. It has an SE Hardcore which is vertical laminate with horizontal strips where heels and toes are placed. I've been looking at my board recently since it's at that point where its got enough dings, chips, and scratches for me to desire a new board.

I really can't justify the expense though, because as far as I know, snowboard manufacturing doesn't seem to have improved that much since I got my board.

So my question to the community is this:
Since I genuinely believe I am wrong in my assumptions as I have NEVER researched boards in my life other than the basic physics behind different core materials, can someone point me in the direction to finding anything and everything to do with freestyle snowboards, their flexibility, and how technology has improved in the last 5-10 years?

I know this is a very broad question, but I've searched and my searches have only turned up board shops trying to tell me they have the best board for my needs, as per usual.

I have an old Burton board in my shed and the near-10 year difference between that board and mine was miles apart. I want to see that kind of a difference if I decide to get a new board, and not just feel like I'm buying a new board for aesthetics.

Anyway, thanks for your input guys!
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Old 11-06-2012, 04:09 PM   #2 (permalink)
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http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boa...g-between.html

a lot has changed, start here
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Old 11-06-2012, 04:25 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Thanks for the quick post!

From what I read in that link, I like the traditional camber style because I've pretty much mastered the cons of catching edges with it, and I really like the pop it gives me, so I would probably go for another camber if I were to buy a new one.

One thing that I have noticed about my particular board is that it seems very stiff compared to some of the other boards I have looked at. I have always desired a more flexible board, is there any more information on the core material, and whatever else goes into a board to make it more flexible that I can digest?

Thanks again!
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Old 11-06-2012, 06:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamps View Post
Other than camber profiles (meh, I prefer Camber), and "serrated edges" like Magne-traction (meh, I prefer regular edges)... Not that much has changed.

They're still wood, FG, and ptex boards with metal edges. Sure resin technology is always improving, sidecut shapes, fibreglass layouts (bi-axial, tri-axial, or quadraxial), carbon fibre and/or kevlar layers, titanal layers, etc. are improving.

I just think for the average middle of the road board, things aren't that different.

Sure a lot of little things can add up to a lot, but I wouldn't get rid of a 2005 board just because there's something newer out there. If it still rides well why not keep it? Unless of course the OP has got 100+ days on it in which case it's probably getting softer.

Speaking of softer, did I hear the OP say he wanted a softer board?
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Old 11-06-2012, 09:04 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Pretty much everything is different. Everything is softer, more damp (exceptions exist) more responsive, better built (exceptions exist), and lighter. Fiberglass has progressed, resins are better, core profiling is more exact and more understood. Rocker.

Boards are made of natural materials. If you bought something from 2000 and literally never rode it today it would ride like poo. Board materials break down over time regardless of how often its been ridden. A 2005 that has been ridden at least 60 days is surely smooshy and dead.

Get something new.
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Old 11-06-2012, 10:26 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Pretty much everything is different. Everything is softer, more damp (exceptions exist) more responsive, better built (exceptions exist), and lighter. Fiberglass has progressed, resins are better, core profiling is more exact and more understood. Rocker.

Boards are made of natural materials. If you bought something from 2000 and literally never rode it today it would ride like poo. Board materials break down over time regardless of how often its been ridden. A 2005 that has been ridden at least 60 days is surely smooshy and dead.

Get something new.
+1, do a demo on a rocker board or hybrid camber, the new shapes are very different, and very fun to ride, a fresh cambered board will I bet feel a lot different too. If budget is an issue def try before you buy, and if you don't see the difference don't change.

I'm not suggesting you buy one, but borrow or demo a Burton Nug, if nothing else it will prove that there are some new and different directions since 2005.

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Last edited by Lamps; 11-06-2012 at 10:33 PM.
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:24 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Ok, so I guess what I didn't realize is that the core materials degrade over time? I mean I know that from sharpening, catching rocks on the wax, and aesthetic scratches on the top material are what degrade. I just thought that the core material was NEVER supposed to degrade, since there it is never exposed to the elements directly.

You guys are saying that the core degrades naturally (poorly built boards pre-200ish era), which was evident from the board in my shed. But also that the core degrades from flexing it so often? And when you say it becomes softer, do you mean more flexible or that it loses the ability to bounce back to its original state (like a spring that has been pulled too often and becomes limp)?

And also to touch on the lighter aspects of boards these days:
My board has always been on the heavier side compared to my friends' with newer ones. Is there a sacrifice of durability and increased degradation with a lighter board? I feel like my board wouldn't have lasted nearly this long had it not been so solid.

Thanks for all the responses, these have been extremely helpful and I like seeing the pros and cons to getting a new board. I would have to agree that in the long run a snowboard can be very cheap (I payed somewhere around $200-$300 in 2006 for a brand new 2005 board), since it has lasted me this long. But still as a lump sum this can be damaging to anyone's budget (assuming said person is planning on also spending money for lift tix).
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:40 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Some things have changed for the worse...manufacturing, materials are not as durable...maybe design things like c3...idk...haven't ridden but why not just ride a cambered. I understand the c3 but why not unweight/suck up the knees...and an argument about catching edges is not valid if ur at the the skill level of doing cross-unders. I have a three old 2004/5 made in CA top-end Options that has been ridden hard, had some hits and still have their shit together; one in particular still hands me my ass if I'm not paying attention and there are very few new boards that demand that level of my attention and aggressiveness.
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:52 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I really think a demo would be a good way to see if it's worth it.

Regarding boards degrading over time I'm not sure that boards that aren't ridden decay but they lose their pop with use; wood cores change their flex after repeated flexing for example.

Ultralight boards are less durable than regular boards and may not be suited for some features, but more generally construction techniques are better so boards of equal durability weigh less now than then.

Try before you buy and if you feel the difference you can decide if it's worth the expense to upgrade. 2012 stuff where available is usually pretty deeply discounted right now.
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Old 11-07-2012, 04:27 PM   #10 (permalink)
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What kind of riding do you do? And how often do you go?
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