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Old 11-13-2012, 11:45 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default New board for long awaited comeback

Hi guys,

So, I'm an old man (33) who began snowboarding in the mid 90's (maybe -93?) but due to a number of reasons, mainly injuries, haven't been snowboarding alot since 2001. I'm now thinking about buying a new board for a long awaited comeback. My current board is an Elan Element 155 from 2001 with burton mission bindings and Ruler shoes and compared to my last board (Forum - Peter Line) it feels pretty damn stiff. It's a cambered and directional board.


I have no idea whether I'm intermediate or advanced or whatever, but between 1998-2001 I lived at a skiresort and did some competitions in Big Jump/ Q-pipe.

When I do go to the slopes nowadays I try to stay away from groomed jumps/ parks and just freeride preferably offpiste if conditions allow. Otherwise i bomb groomers. I love powder, but living in south of Norway I might get 1 really good powder day pr. year (> 10 inches) if I'm lucky. Generally my riding consist of carving choppy, hard or bumpy offpiste searching for pow or carving groomers searching for the same thing. But you can also find me digging a kicker if conditions allow.

I've searched the forum for answers and as I understand there's heaps of differnet designs out ther nowadays; camber, rocker, rocker -camber, s-rocker etc.


My stats:

5'10''
160 lbs (with clothes)
10 size boot
18-19 inches stance

Since Burton had a good reputation when I was riding I'm now considering the Custom X - 158. I've also looked in to the RC profiles of the Never summer snowboards. The few times I have ridden deep powder my Elan hasn't really felt that floaty and leg burn has been a major issue.

What do u guys think, will the Custom X be to stiff? I'd really love a board that could swallow some of the vibrations when riding in bad conditions (hard/choppy) offpiste. I like to go fast and realise that my leg muscles will be the limiting factor at this point and not skills or board. The good thing though is that I think my old thigh muscles will be pretty fast to catch up.

Other suggestions for boards?

Last edited by Tenzing79; 11-13-2012 at 11:52 AM.
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:53 AM   #2 (permalink)
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you're not that old

custom x sounds like a good choice, if you like to go fast and carve it's excellent for that
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:57 AM   #3 (permalink)
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The Burton Custom X is their stiffest board meant primarily for hard charging the mountain and easily capable going down as fast as possible. Overall from what you have said it seems like a great choice for you.

Others that I would say are in that same range:
Rossignol One MagTek
Ride Machete GT
Ride Highlife
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:58 AM   #4 (permalink)
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If you like fast and stiff I can recommend the Arbor A-Frame. Pretty good in powder too if you set it back. Trad. camber board.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:02 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I'm 33 myself... 5'9" 150 lbs. I've been riding Never Summers the last couple of years (2003 Evo, 2009 SL, 2012 Proto CT). Never Summers are know for being "damp" and soaking up a lot vibration from cruddy snow. This is me riding a SL 155... but the Heritage is the SL's big brother and is even more damp, great for those aching knees


Last edited by lonerider; 11-13-2012 at 12:04 PM.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:04 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenzing79 View Post
Hi guys,
My stats:

5'10160 lbs (with clothes)
10 size boot
18-19 inches stance
18"-19" inches is pretty narrowfor a stance/narrow enough stance to the point it will hinder you at your height. Unless you are oddly proportioned and have the legs of a midget with the torso of a giraffe.
Stance is measured from center to center of the mounting discs. For reference I'm 5'7 and have a stance of 21.5"
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:08 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bseracka View Post
18"-19" inches is pretty narrowfor a stance/narrow enough stance to the point it will hinder you at your height. Unless you are oddly proportioned and have the legs of a midget with the torso of a giraffe.
Stance is measured from center to center of the mounting discs. For reference I'm 5'7 and have a stance of 21.5"
I didn't even notice that... yes... modern stances have widened... I have really narrow hips (30") and relatively short legs (30") so my stance is only 20.5-21", but most people in our height range go for something in the 21.5" - 22.5" range...

They do that for stability and to tweak the knees a little less... don't go TOO WIDE (like over 23") because you start getting less mechanical advantage for tipping the board up to carve at that point.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:36 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lonerider View Post
I didn't even notice that... yes... modern stances have widened... I have really narrow hips (30") and relatively short legs (30") so my stance is only 20.5-21", but most people in our height range go for something in the 21.5" - 22.5" range...

They do that for stability and to tweak the knees a little less... don't go TOO WIDE (like over 23") because you start getting less mechanical advantage for tipping the board up to carve at that point.
I had the perfect stance width dialed up (I'm short at 5'6"), I didn't measure it as it was on the slopes on a trip. It was a coda 153 with the bindings centered on the board. Thinking I need a tweak, I brought them in one notch/hole, and proceeded to injure my front knee when charging hard in Alpine Meadows. Tweaked it bad. I moved it back (obviously) and I could ride, but I felt the pain here and there for a while.
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Old 11-13-2012, 03:10 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Ok, so maybe my stance is around 20 inches but it is very narrow. Thing is since I'm buying a new board I want to make sure I'm making the right decision and feel that I should capitalize on the advancements made in board design.

What will be the difference in ride-ability between a fully cambered board (Custom X) and lets say the NS Heritage? Read somewhere that RC's feels like riding spoons, which I don't find appealing. The sound of better float in soft conditions sounds excellent though.

During season I'll be riding:

20 % deep pow (mainly flat forest)
20 % chopped, hard/heavy pow
30 % hardpacked offpiste
30 % groomers

Is the difference in carving ability/stability at speed really that much different from a fully cambered to a NS RC?
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:39 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenzing79 View Post
Ok, so maybe my stance is around 20 inches but it is very narrow. Thing is since I'm buying a new board I want to make sure I'm making the right decision and feel that I should capitalize on the advancements made in board design.

What will be the difference in ride-ability between a fully cambered board (Custom X) and lets say the NS Heritage? Read somewhere that RC's feels like riding spoons, which I don't find appealing. The sound of better float in soft conditions sounds excellent though.

During season I'll be riding:

20 % deep pow (mainly flat forest)
20 % chopped, hard/heavy pow
30 % hardpacked offpiste
30 % groomers

Is the difference in carving ability/stability at speed really that much different from a fully cambered to a NS RC?
No worries, I was still riding 20.5" stances up until like 4 years ago. (21" is my default stance now).

A full rocker does feel like a spoon, especially when you are flatboard or coming off the chair at the top of the lift... but most boards are not full rocker (there are now a myriad number of permutations... see this link for some of the basic variations that are out now). Never Summer boards are camber-rocker-camber.

So in 2009 I switch from the cambered NS SL 155 to the hybrid camber NS SL 155 (which has both rockered and mini cambered sections). This was the first year non-rockered boards really were available. What is feels like the board suddenly has a very wide flatboard area, the edges will not engage immediately. However, once you tip the board, the edges grab and turn like a traditional cambered snowboard. The one thing is that you need to be confidant in your edge changes... no 0.5 of degree tilting, you need to put it up to like 1 degree at least before it engages (so for true carving afficinados there is a tiny delay in response). Unless you are a complete beginner, you will only really notice this effect coming off the lift with one foot strapped in... since you don't have normal leverage turning the board is a little trickier here and you just need to not panic and tilt the board with confidence.

The benefit of this is that you are much less likely to catch your edge as well. Riding on powder... the rockered section noticeably helps you keep the board about that snow, and you get a little bit of surfy roll to the board as well. Stability is not really affected by hybrid camber... the board's shape and construction still make the most difference.

Here is a video of riding the SL 155, just to show that a hybrid rocker board can be carved... provided you know what you are doing.


I also rode a LibTech Jamie Lynn Phoenix with C2BTX - here is a to even more confusing combinations) and that actually felt too spoon like for me. I didn't like the Magnatraction either (bites really quick and early, and makes my carves kind of rough... I think it actually slows you down through the turns too).

Last edited by lonerider; 11-13-2012 at 04:44 PM.
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