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-   -   Flex and Profile (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/52760-flex-profile.html)

snoWorm 12-28-2012 08:15 AM

Flex and Profile
 
The Board flex is responsible for doing butters,jumps etc or the Board Profile?
At most reviews I read , people refers mostly to camber,reverse camber profiles etc for buttering,park,jumps jibbing etc and not too much for at board flex...

-For example can you do better butters with a flexible campered board rather than a non very flexible but rockered board?
The size of board affect this ?

onefutui2e 12-28-2012 08:51 AM

your post is all over the place but i'll take a crack at it and someone else will correct me as needed.

flex is probably more important than profile. a softer board can be buttered more easily because it's easier to bend. a stiffer board gives you a more stable platform for taking on jumps. i believe a softer flex board is also better for jibs as well as they're generally not as aggressive.

however, a rocker-profile board is slightly easier to press because of its inherent shape. but a regular/flat profile board is better for jumps because it gives you more pop out of an ollie due to the leverage created. rockered boards also tend to wash out on landings and are generally seen as better for jibs due to its more mellow ride.

snoWorm 12-29-2012 12:07 PM

So what is most important to choose the better board for you? First the Flex and then the profile or the opposite?

If all these you said are right , anyone can say that a rockered but flexible board has the same +/- with a campered but stiffer board ... :blink:

onefutui2e 12-30-2012 10:11 AM

are you a beginner snowboarder? if so, i'm going to say none of it matters. they make too many boards covering the entire spectrum of flex/profile that you're going to drive yourself NUTS trying to decide which board is the right one for you. i would suggest a medium-flex rockered board for ease of learning.

and i guess your second statement is somewhat true. there are compromises made when going rocker or camber, stiff or noodle. if you're a beginner, again, a medium-flex rocker board will be a great start.

snoWorm 12-30-2012 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by onefutui2e (Post 558858)
are you a beginner snowboarder? if so, i'm going to say none of it matters. they make too many boards covering the entire spectrum of flex/profile that you're going to drive yourself NUTS trying to decide which board is the right one for you. i would suggest a medium-flex rockered board for ease of learning.

and i guess your second statement is somewhat true. there are compromises made when going rocker or camber, stiff or noodle. if you're a beginner, again, a medium-flex rocker board will be a great start.

I am not a beginner, I woul say "advanced beginner" :) . I had a Burton Twin '07 161 (6.1'' , 180lbs), that was either too big or too stiff! Absolutely something much more playful and flexible and ofcourse sorter! But I do not know how to choose between all these boards! (Burton Hero is one choice do not you think?)

AAA 12-30-2012 11:26 PM

You can't really predict how a board will ride by focusing on just one element. A board's riding characteristics are derived from the entire construction of the board...aerial profile (length, width, sidecut geometry, taper), horizontal profile (various configurations of camber and rocker), flex pattern (as in stiffness AND distribution), and materials, so you need to look at it all.

Unfortunately, manufacturer descriptions are typically more focused on hype than substance, and are so woefully inadequate. "Published" online and mag reviews are even worse, being little more than manufacturer paid advertisements or store sales promotions under such rediculous guise.

To compare boards without riding them, it's difficult, but you need to seek out peer reviews and look for reoccuring themes in them. Then you need to look into actual build information (numbers) from the manufacturers to try to get a sense of how riding and construction correlates. From there, you can start to get a sense of how you can expect a board to ride. Actually RIDING different boards is of course ideal, but may or may not be realistic.


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