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Old 01-07-2013, 01:45 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Board help?

UPDATE: Alright so I've finally narrowed down to 3 boards based on a sale, the 2012 Ride DH2.6, 2012 Ride DH, and the 2012 Forum Doubledog Destroyer

Which of these is the is the best performing boards?

Hi guys, first post here. I've been boarding for a year or so and have been using my brothers old Lamar Tripper 1540 board and I'm looking to upgrade to my own board. If the 1540 would indicate that its 154cm I don't really want to go too much longer. I'm around 6'1, 170, and size 12 foot. I'm an intermediate rider who rides mostly groomers but I'd like to progress a little more in the park, and hit powder more.
So far I've looked at
but I'm totally open to suggestion, but being in Calgary there aren't many demos that i can go to. Thanks guys.

Last edited by kbettch; 02-03-2013 at 04:57 PM.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:53 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Thank you for staying in your range

Yes, you need a wide board. Wide boards are recommended for size boots 10 and up (depending on the brand of boot- some are more bulky than others), especially with a board shorter than a 157. I'm 5'10, 180lbs with a size 10 boot and I ride one board that's a 152W and a 157 regular. They both have the same waist width at 252mm, and that's the lowest width that I can go before I start noticing the toe and heel drag. You'll notice a huge change in your ability to turn once most of your toe and heel drag is gone when you ride a wide board. A 156W sounds about the right size for you, but go to a shop and put some boots on and lay the different board sizes down and see which will fit your feet the best. A 156W will also be a good size to have some fun in the park. I see too many guys that are a little taller and have big feet who automatically think they need the longest board possible, but you should easily be able to ride something short in a wide. The boards you listed are good boards. I would also suggest a K2 Lifelike or Never Summer Revolover
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:58 AM   #3 (permalink)
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156 does sound right and is a good place to start, it seems like you'd need a wide too.
The double dog is a good board and I'd look for one of those if you can.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:08 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Thanks guys, anyone know how good of a fit the Ride Machete would be?
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:14 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbettch View Post
Thanks guys, anyone know how good of a fit the Ride Machete would be?
Very good board, gets lot's of good reviews. Was a TWS Good Wood winner last year or two years ago. Good all around and excels for freestyle and has no problem in the park
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:12 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Anyone have any experience with the burton nug, the Raduction sounds very intriguing.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:32 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
Yes, you need a wide board.
That is probably correct. Most of the rest is inaccurate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
Wide boards are recommended for size boots 10 and up (depending on the brand of boot- some are more bulky than others), especially with a board shorter than a 157.
No, wide boards are (very) generally recommended for foot sizes of 12 (not 10) and above. Bulkiness of the boot is not really important for anything but pow - what matters is foot size.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
I'm 5'10, 180lbs with a size 10 boot and I ride one board that's a 152W and a 157 regular. They both have the same waist width at 252mm, and that's the lowest width that I can go before I start noticing the toe and heel drag.
Waist width is pretty meaningless without taking into consideration sidecut radius, stance width, etc. What matters is the width of the board at the binding/foot positions. Read wired's excellent explanation that has been posted several times (e.g., here (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boa...tml#post533183)).

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
You'll notice a huge change in your ability to turn once most of your toe and heel drag is gone when you ride a wide board.
Very few people actually experience real toe/heel drag - and then only in pow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
A 156W sounds about the right size for you, but go to a shop and put some boots on and lay the different board sizes down and see which will fit your feet the best.
Agree that the 156W sounds about right. But board width measurement should be done with bare feet, not with boots on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrrmaty View Post
A 156W will also be a good size to have some fun in the park. I see too many guys that are a little taller and have big feet who automatically think they need the longest board possible, but you should easily be able to ride something short in a wide. The boards you listed are good boards. I would also suggest a K2 Lifelike or Never Summer Revolover
Yup.

Last edited by hktrdr; 01-07-2013 at 11:24 PM.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:53 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Check out never summer. I just picked up the new revolver for this year and I love it. I have a size 11 boot and the revolver is a mid wide. Their RC tech is on all of their boards and it's really effective. It holds an edge great on the mountain and it slays in the park.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:25 AM   #9 (permalink)
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it is irrelevant as the nug would be too narrow for you. My wife rides one though and loves it.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:45 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hktrdr View Post
That is probably correct. Most of the rest is inaccurate.

Only according to you. I have 14 years of riding experience, 6 years as a semi-professional, sponsored athlete, 4 years of teaching as an AASI certified snowboard instructor, 2 years experience as a mountain rep and countless hours of training and selling experience on brand specific features of products. I've worked in the snowboarding industry for 10 years and have been to numerous tradeshows, lectures, trainings, and seminars where similar topics have been discussed. I know what I'm talking about


No, wide boards are (very) generally recommended for foot sizes of 12 (not 10) and above. Bulkiness of the boot is not really important for anything but pow - what matters is foot size.

Ok, let's be honest, if you're looking for a park board and you have a size 10 boot, try riding a 152 regular width and see how much fun that is. If your at least decent you will notice toe and heel drag. But a size 10 can fit on a regular width board at maybe a 155 and definitely by a 157. And you probably haven't ever tried on different brands of boots or else you would have noticed that some brands are bulkier than others. For example- Thirtytwo boots are bulky (have a larger profile) compared to Saloman boots. Even some boots by the same brand have different profiles or bulkiness, lets take the Burton AWOL vs. the Burton Mission. Burton AWOL has a much smaller profile than the missions. I can ride the exact same setup of board and binding with two different sets of boots, one with a bulky profile and one with a low profile) and experience toe drag from the bulky boot but none, or reduced toe drag from the low profile boot, but there IS a difference, and powder is where you would notice the difference the least. Hard pack groomers or icy conditions would make the drag much more noticeable because there is no "give" to the snow in those conditions.


Waist width is pretty meaningless without taking into consideration sidecut radius, stance width, etc. What matters is the width of the board at the binding/foot positions. Read wired's excellent explanation that has been posted several times (e.g., here (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boa...tml#post533183)).

This is a very good description, however, many people do their research online and usually the only stat listed is the waist width. Of course the actual width where your feet are will be greater than the width, and will vary depending on the radius and sidecut, but generally speaking, a quick method to determining if a board will be wide enough for you is by looking at the waist width listed. If you have a ton of time on your hands and you want to take the time to call each manufacturer and ask them what the measurements are for the width at the inserts then be my guest. But it sounds like kbettch is looking at a lot of boards and it would be a pain in the butt to go and get all that info when in reality he will probably be fine just knowing the waist width and gauging what size he needs from that and using his common sense.


Very few people actually experience real toe/heel drag - and then only in pow.

True, most people will never be good enough or learn real dynamic carving to notice the effects of their toe and heel drag. Most people only ride groomed runs and perform basic skidded or dynamic skidded S-turns (which by the way is not techinically "carving"). But on a steep slope side-slipping toeside with a size 12 boot and a 156 not-wide board will quickly see what toe drag really is. And again, in powder you would be least likely to experience toe and heel drag unless you are riding in really heavy snow

Agree that the 156W sounds about right. But board width measurement should be done with bare feet, not with boots on.



Yup.
At least we agree on one thing
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