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predtldrider 01-08-2013 03:29 PM

Board Type: Basic Intermediate Rider
 
Hello! First post;

Iím just hoping for a little direction on the type of new snowboard to get. I am 46 years old physically fit 5í11Ē about 195 size 10.5 shoes. I snow-skied for about 20 years and have boarded for about 5 plus (Iíll never ski again, love boarding). 7 to 10 full days on the slopes is a pretty good year for me though I always try for more. I rented for several years and since the past couple years now own a 1999 Burton Custom 64 with Flow bindings which I bought as a prior rental board and consider myself a competent but basic intermediate all-mountain rider. I ride in Nor Cal in the Sierraís primarily; Boreal, Donner Ski Ranch, Soda Springs, Tahoe-Donner, Sugar Bowl, and Mt Rose. I predominantly ride the groomed runs from single diamond to blues (avoid double blacks) and particularly enjoy several inches of fresh powder atop a groomed run. I run at moderate speed, and hit the parks every so often for the smaller jumps and occasionally try the features (usually not very well) though I am truly just a visitor in the park. I do plan to expand my park abilities ever so slightly but I have no interest in becoming a freestyle rider. Iím not looking to develop my abilities exponentially other than to simply improve with time and possibly consider slightly deeper powder (though I donít ever see myself much off the established runs) I am primarily interested in a comfortable set-up yet have no interest in a ďbeginnerĒ board. My plan is to get a new set-up (board, boots and bindings) knowing it may probably be my last and likely be with me for the next 15 plus years I plan to continue this sport. I will probably go for another Flow type of binding as I truly enjoy the easy in feature.

I am comfortable and happy with my current board (which I understand is a traditional camber board) and currently donít worry about catching an edge and would like to keep it that way. Iíve learned of the hybrid boards and am considering one though I have more to learn about them and am not interested in a board that is unstable at speeds. My research so far seems to indicate that my type of riding may be best suited for another camber board though I have no reservations switching to another type if Iím convinced it would be suitable. So, I would greatly appreciate any direction on the type/types of board I should consider, and subsequently appropriate model/models. Also, if a camber board such as the Custom would be a consideration what more/different could I expect from a current model compared to my 1999?

I have searched the forum and learned alot and plan to continue, though I've found the majority of the posts lean towards a brand or model of board and I'm just hoping for some clearer direction on a type first (camber, hybrid camber, hybrid rocker, etc) then building from there.

I know there's a lot of information here and I appreciate any advice and direction available. Thanks very much in advance.

Lamps 01-08-2013 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by predtldrider (Post 563170)
Hello! First post;

Iím just hoping for a little direction on the type of new snowboard to get. I am 46 years old physically fit 5í11Ē about 195 size 10.5 shoes. I snow-skied for about 20 years and have boarded for about 5 plus (Iíll never ski again, love boarding). 7 to 10 full days on the slopes is a pretty good year for me though I always try for more. I rented for several years and since the past couple years now own a 1999 Burton Custom 64 with Flow bindings which I bought as a prior rental board and consider myself a competent but basic intermediate all-mountain rider. I ride in Nor Cal in the Sierraís primarily; Boreal, Donner Ski Ranch, Soda Springs, Tahoe-Donner, Sugar Bowl, and Mt Rose. I predominantly ride the groomed runs from single diamond to blues (avoid double blacks) and particularly enjoy several inches of fresh powder atop a groomed run. I run at moderate speed, and hit the parks every so often for the smaller jumps and occasionally try the features (usually not very well) though I am truly just a visitor in the park. I do plan to expand my park abilities ever so slightly but I have no interest in becoming a freestyle rider. Iím not looking to develop my abilities exponentially other than to simply improve with time and possibly consider slightly deeper powder (though I donít ever see myself much off the established runs) I am primarily interested in a comfortable set-up yet have no interest in a ďbeginnerĒ board. My plan is to get a new set-up (board, boots and bindings) knowing it may probably be my last and likely be with me for the next 15 plus years I plan to continue this sport. I will probably go for another Flow type of binding as I truly enjoy the easy in feature.

I am comfortable and happy with my current board (which I understand is a traditional camber board) and currently donít worry about catching an edge and would like to keep it that way. Iíve learned of the hybrid boards and am considering one though I have more to learn about them and am not interested in a board that is unstable at speeds. My research so far seems to indicate that my type of riding may be best suited for another camber board though I have no reservations switching to another type if Iím convinced it would be suitable. So, I would greatly appreciate any direction on the type/types of board I should consider, and subsequently appropriate model/models. Also, if a camber board such as the Custom would be a consideration what more/different could I expect from a current model compared to my 1999?

I have searched the forum and learned alot and plan to continue, though I've found the majority of the posts lean towards a brand or model of board and I'm just hoping for some clearer direction on a type first (camber, hybrid camber, hybrid rocker, etc) then building from there.

I know there's a lot of information here and I appreciate any advice and direction available. Thanks very much in advance.

Demo days are your friend. Since you don't sound like a super aggressive rider and you're not on the ice coast you don't have to go camber, and the hybrid and rocker shapes are fun to ride so you should try them out.

I'd recommend that you look for a burton demo day and try to ride the custom in cambered and flying V cofiguration plus try a full rockered board as well. That way you can see how the custom has evolved over 13 years and also see the difference between the various profiles.

From 1999 to now I expect the equipment will be lighter and snappier, and you probably could ride something a little shorter than the 164 you have now, there's a been a trend to riding boards a little shorter.

Since you are already an intermediate rider you can harvest opinions here about what to try, but really trying out a bunch of boards is best. Any demo day will do for that but if you want to see the difference between today's Custom and your current version a burton demo day would answer that question. I'd also recommend that you try the Burton Antler, it would be a good board for what you want to do, I ride similar style and demo'd one recently and liked it.

Since I'm a willing and happy prisoner of burton's proprietary board and binding connection tech I can only suggest from their line, it's all I really know. Others here can recommend from other brands.

blockay 01-08-2013 04:43 PM

i'm not exactly sure what the flow easy in feature is, but you're main concern for bindings should be how they fit. you want you're binding to fit snug and in the center of the board with no toe and heel drag. you should definitely try out different boards to find the one you like. you're 1999 board might have a good edge to it, but i'm sure that after that many years, the boards flex is not the same as it was designed. board technology has definitely expanded since 1999, a new board will probably give you the confidence you need to expand your snowboarding skills.

poutanen 01-08-2013 05:30 PM

:welcome:

I went through a similar process as you but had my first board for 15 years. Changed bindings twice, and boots twice in that period. Since then I've gone from a 10-15 day a year boarder to a 50 day a year boarder and things do wear out.

If you're happy on a Custom camber then I'd be temped to stay on a Custom camber, taking lamps advice of a demo day... If you can, I'd try the Custom flying V, then the Custom camber, then the Custom X camber. As a bigger guy, you could ride a Custom X a little shorter than the Custom, and still not have it get out of hand at speed.

I too like the current EST/ICS/Channel binding system and I hope all board companies go that way when Burtons patent runs out. It's just a better system... Not without it's flaws, but still better IMHO.

scotty100 01-08-2013 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poutanen (Post 563265)
:welcome:

I too like the current EST/ICS/Channel binding system and I hope all board companies go that way when Burtons patent runs out. It's just a better system... Not without it's flaws, but still better IMHO.

Why do you think it's a better system? Interested to understand the pros and cons a bit more. thanks (sorry OP did not mean to threadjack).

poutanen 01-08-2013 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scotty100 (Post 563307)
Why do you think it's a better system? Interested to understand the pros and cons a bit more. thanks (sorry OP did not mean to threadjack).

I've had both for years, I've got a good 60-70 days of hard riding on a 2011 Burton with EST/ICS. I just recently bought a non-Burton board again as my primary board and was reminded of how limited you are with the 4x4 system. If you want any adjustment towards the heel edge or toe edge, you're stuck with whatever stance widths the board comes in and vise versa.

I'm picky enough that a 1/2" here or there makes a difference to me, and having essentially infinite adjustability inside that window makes a big difference.

Some people talk about the flex pattern of the board being different (ie. better with EST than without) but I didn't notice any difference that way and I have identical bindings on my EST and non-EST boards. So I guess the short answer for me is adjustability! :yahoo:

KIRKRIDER 01-08-2013 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by predtldrider (Post 563170)
Hello! First post;

Iím just hoping for a little direction on the type of new snowboard to get. I am 46 years old physically fit 5í11Ē about 195 size 10.5 shoes. I snow-skied for about 20 years and have boarded for about 5 plus (Iíll never ski again, love boarding). 7 to 10 full days on the slopes is a pretty good year for me though I always try for more. I rented for several years and since the past couple years now own a 1999 Burton Custom 64 with Flow bindings which I bought as a prior rental board and consider myself a competent but basic intermediate all-mountain rider. I ride in Nor Cal in the Sierraís primarily; Boreal, Donner Ski Ranch, Soda Springs, Tahoe-Donner, Sugar Bowl, and Mt Rose. I predominantly ride the groomed runs from single diamond to blues (avoid double blacks) and particularly enjoy several inches of fresh powder atop a groomed run. I run at moderate speed, and hit the parks every so often for the smaller jumps and occasionally try the features (usually not very well) though I am truly just a visitor in the park. I do plan to expand my park abilities ever so slightly but I have no interest in becoming a freestyle rider. Iím not looking to develop my abilities exponentially other than to simply improve with time and possibly consider slightly deeper powder (though I donít ever see myself much off the established runs) I am primarily interested in a comfortable set-up yet have no interest in a ďbeginnerĒ board. My plan is to get a new set-up (board, boots and bindings) knowing it may probably be my last and likely be with me for the next 15 plus years I plan to continue this sport. I will probably go for another Flow type of binding as I truly enjoy the easy in feature.

I am comfortable and happy with my current board (which I understand is a traditional camber board) and currently donít worry about catching an edge and would like to keep it that way. Iíve learned of the hybrid boards and am considering one though I have more to learn about them and am not interested in a board that is unstable at speeds. My research so far seems to indicate that my type of riding may be best suited for another camber board though I have no reservations switching to another type if Iím convinced it would be suitable. So, I would greatly appreciate any direction on the type/types of board I should consider, and subsequently appropriate model/models. Also, if a camber board such as the Custom would be a consideration what more/different could I expect from a current model compared to my 1999?

I have searched the forum and learned alot and plan to continue, though I've found the majority of the posts lean towards a brand or model of board and I'm just hoping for some clearer direction on a type first (camber, hybrid camber, hybrid rocker, etc) then building from there.

I know there's a lot of information here and I appreciate any advice and direction available. Thanks very much in advance.


Your riding sounds similar to mine..before powder. I absolutely LOVE my Arbor A-Frame. a camber board that is the closest thing to an alpine one with soft boots, but agile and able to ride powder too. Amazing for carving. And my new JJ Hovercraft. Rocker, camber rocker. SO easy, so floaty in the powder, so big and yet so agile. Love both in different days. Both under a pair of K2 Cinch CTX (rear entry) bindings. Check the reviews for both here:

http://thegoodride

Oldman 01-08-2013 08:30 PM

My first "ride" was a fully cambered Elan Aragon which was a bit of a plank, but I am grateful for having learned on a cambered deck. Learning on a cambered deck I believe you develop much better technique which will remain with you for the rest of your riding days.

Since then I have acquired a Rossignol One Magtek which is slightly cambered between the feet and rockered out at the tips. I also have a Lib Tech Lando which is rockered between the feet and cambered under your feet. ( both of these decks have Magnatraction, but of differing degrees: more aggressive on the Rossi, less so on the Lando.)

I have retired the Elan, but LOVE riding both the Rossi & the Lando. They both offer a very different ride, both are great for the type of riding you are into.

As Lamp has recommended, hit a demo day and ride'em, all of them, and see which one pushes your buttons. There is a noticeable difference in how the different profiles ride and only you can decide which one feels the best to you. Reading about boards is one thing, riding the real deal will provide you with the feedback you need to select the deck that is best for you. Good Luck !!!!!!!!

predtldrider 01-11-2013 10:17 PM

Wow everybody thanks. Lots of great information. Yea I do want to try a demo-day and have made some inquiries just havent found one that works. I'm about 4-5 hours from the slopes so a bit of a production to get up there but I agree, makes alot of sense to ride before buying.

What you guys posted helps alot and gives me some great direction and something to chew on! I made an inquiry with Burton given what I have now and a Custom Cambered or Custom Flying V was recommended, sized down to a 160, which totally coincides with much of what was said here!

Again, thanks very much everything is greatly appreciated.

SGoldwin 01-12-2013 08:13 PM

A little step in another direction. I am at your age and have a similar riding background. Until last year I stayed as far away from the park as I could - old and frightened:)

But when riding with my sons I had to try the park and it wasn't fun just to ride through it without testing. But my old board (Custom X) was to long and to stiff for the park.

So for this year a bought a Salomon Drift Rocker with Salomon Rhythm bindings. So much fun, both in the park and outside. It isn't a board for high speed but it has all other fun stuff: Easy to press, easy to turn, superlight combo which helps me to make 180/360.

Since I like to try new thing and develop my skills this was a step in right direction and I believe that this has made me a better boarder all over the mountain.

And now I can ride with my sons and push their and mine skills.


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