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Old 07-13-2008, 11:09 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Would SPIs be too advanced/unforgiving for a beginner rider? I currently have Burton Missions and feel like they lack response, particularly on toe side turns. I'm looking for a binding I can progress with with, and I don't care about park riding. I'll be putting these on a Ride DH (I know I said I don't ride park, but I was told that freestyle boards can be more forgiving to learn on because the flexibility makes them easier to turn)
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Old 07-14-2008, 12:27 AM   #2 (permalink)
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there is no such thing as equipment too advanced. its all gear/personal preference. whatever you choose to get, it will work. in my opinion, ride bindings are pretty solid
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Old 07-14-2008, 10:24 AM   #3 (permalink)
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there is no such thing as equipment too advanced.
I respectfully disagree. While I do agree/believe that anyone can ride any snowboard equipment, what's affected is the efficiency of progression (and in some cases the ride itself). An advanced board where it's stiffer will serve well to those who know how to control the board and their skills bombing down the mountain. While it will most likely cause a beginner to catch edges left and right (especially if they're not proficient at linking turns and ride at slower speeds). In retrospect a beginner board is more forgiving. Same with bindings (IMO). A stiffer binding that will transfer power and quick initiation to the board edges will be good for more advanced riders, however could have a negative affect to new riders.

Again, I believe anyone can ride any gear, however it's the progression that will suffer for the beginners. If a newbie uses gear tailored to their skills, I think they'll progress faster than using gear made for more advanced riders. Unfortunately, 80-90% of beginners just want the best piece of equipment. This can be attributed to the mentality of having the latest and greatest and in many cases the "bling factor". More often than not, this equipment is reserved more for those that are skilled.

I remember when I first started riding, I wanted the latest and greatest best out there. I went out and bought a Burton Custom at that time. I used it the first 3-4 times out and was progressing somewhat. A buddy of mine suggested I use a more beginner friendly board. Unfortunately I can't remember which board it was back then, but do remember it made a significant difference in my learning. I was able to pick up snowboarding faster and progressed much quicker. I ended up borrowing his board for the next couple months and by the end of the season I was doing much much better on my Custom.

OK sorry for digressing...back to the OP..what is your style of riding? That will help in determining the type of bindings best for you. As snowolf said...check your stance width and forward lean of the binding. One fun part of learning is experimenting with your gear. I would exhaust all options before dropping cash in another set of bindings.

The Ride SPI's aren't a bad binding. I have the Ride Delta's paired to an Atomic Axum and they're great. They're very responsive when you need them to be and the right flex for freestyle type riding.

I also have Rome Targas paired to a Rome Anthem board. They're very stiff and transfer power and heel/toe initiation very well to the edges. While they'll serve a more advanced rider better...I know many who are beginner/near-intermediates that use them and like them.

Best of luck in your decision. Again before "possibly" wasting money...try exhausting all options to see if it corrects your problem.
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Old 07-14-2008, 10:29 AM   #4 (permalink)
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By the way here's a good thread on Ride bindings...hope it helps...

http://www.snowboardingforum.com/equ...vmnt-ride.html
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Old 07-14-2008, 12:45 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Thanks for the feedback guys. Snowolf, this past season was my first snowboarding, and I went 5 times before being sidelined with a shoulder injury/surgery. I was comfortably going down blue runs, and could get down steeper runs with some modicum of control. I hear what you mean about turn initiation becoming work, which makes me wonder if I do indeed have my stance set too wide. I don't mean this boastfully, but I'm in very good shape, doing lots of weights, cardio, and yoga (which provides a lot of isometric leg stengthening). Yet, I found my legs, particularly on icy days, being jello at the end of the day. It feels like I'm working harder than I should, or like I'm losing some efficency somewhere along the way. I particularly noticed this on my toe side turns, feeling like I'd lost all coordination by the end of the day. I'm not sure what my width is set at, as it was done my by local shop. Can you tell while the bindings are on? What are the points that you measure? Also, I know board length is determined more by weight and riding style than height. Other than comfort, what generally determines stance width?

Last edited by buggravy; 07-14-2008 at 01:25 PM.
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Old 07-14-2008, 03:05 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by buggravy View Post
Thanks for the feedback guys. Snowolf, this past season was my first snowboarding, and I went 5 times before being sidelined with a shoulder injury/surgery. I was comfortably going down blue runs, and could get down steeper runs with some modicum of control. I hear what you mean about turn initiation becoming work, which makes me wonder if I do indeed have my stance set too wide. I don't mean this boastfully, but I'm in very good shape, doing lots of weights, cardio, and yoga (which provides a lot of isometric leg stengthening). Yet, I found my legs, particularly on icy days, being jello at the end of the day. It feels like I'm working harder than I should, or like I'm losing some efficency somewhere along the way. I particularly noticed this on my toe side turns, feeling like I'd lost all coordination by the end of the day. I'm not sure what my width is set at, as it was done my by local shop. Can you tell while the bindings are on? What are the points that you measure? Also, I know board length is determined more by weight and riding style than height. Other than comfort, what generally determines stance width?
IMO regardless of how much you work out legs, do cardio, yoga etc, snowboarding is a different beast and will use different muscles (and a lot more of them). I'm in the same situation as I work out regularly and very fit...yet after the first session of each season my legs are toast (haha).

In regards to stance width...what it really comes down to is comfort as everyone is different. However as a general ruled you should try and stay around shoulder width apart. There are some measurement tables online somewhere that give a general width based on rider's height. As you know by now efficiency is key (especially if you do day long boarding sessions). No need to expend more energy than needed.

Also out of curiosity...what angles are you bindings set at. For me I've noticed that some angle combinations weren't as comfortable and actually made it harder to initiate some turns (again that was me).
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Old 07-14-2008, 04:22 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Also out of curiosity...what angles are you bindings set at. For me I've noticed that some angle combinations weren't as comfortable and actually made it harder to initiate some turns (again that was me).
I'm away from my board, but I'm pretty sure they're at 15/6. That's pretty standard issue, correct? As with stance, I just deferred to whatever the guy at the shop suggested, and haven't messed around with it. Only thing I've tried so far was adjusting the forward lean, as Snowolf suggested above. Seemed to help a bit, but I only tried that for the last hour or so of my last day on the mountain.
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Old 07-14-2008, 06:26 PM   #8 (permalink)
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For me a 15/6 is more difficult to ride as it's not as comfortable and makes controlling the board a little harder (again for me). A good starting point is 15/-3 or 15/-6. I think it mimics a more natural stance. However it'll come down to you playing with the angles and seeing what is comfortable. I believe a lot of beginners do a 15/-3 and if that works for you...try a -6.

If I remember right my ROME Anthem setup is at 15/-6 and my Atomic is at 15/-15 (it's a freestyle twin tip board).
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Old 07-14-2008, 06:40 PM   #9 (permalink)
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actually, that was a typo on my part. meant 15/-6
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