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Old 12-01-2008, 10:45 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default New to the sport

Ok, so since the end of winter last year I promised my son that I would take him to get some snowboarding lessons. Over the weekend we did just that, and boy did we have a blast. We are both very new to the sport and really excited to learn more and improve our skills.

That being said, I would like to get some advice on gear. I bought a used board tonight off of ebay, it is a 2005 Burton Triumph 173. It took me a long time to find the size, the guy selling it didn't know much about the board since he claimed he was selling it for a friend. The board appears to be in great shape, but I am not sure I made a good decision on it. I am 6'1" 210 pounds with a size 10.5 shoe. The board comes with burton mission bindings. From what I understand, my ideal board size is about 155 to 163. What can I expect with a board at 173 length? I by no means am anywhere near being good at snowboarding yet but I have determination and a 10 year old son that will be pushing me.

I also picked up some Burton "ruler" boots, they were new last year.

Let me know what you guys and gals think.

Thank
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Old 12-01-2008, 10:53 PM   #2 (permalink)
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173 is super long for a beginner regardless of your height/weight. It's harder for a beginner to control such long boards and you can get going on some dangerous speeds with that length without even realizing it. You should look into trying a 166 length or something around it.

Thats a good board to ride but you have to be careful buying used boards, especially if you are buying over eBay. You need to take a really good look at it. Make sure the edges are sharp and at 90degrees. Make sure the topsheet doesnt have any bubbling or cracks, and the bottom sheet is free of deep scratches or big P-Tex jobs.
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Old 12-01-2008, 11:18 PM   #3 (permalink)
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You should be learning on something like a 155-160.
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:11 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I would have said 160-ish, give or take a couple. I suspect learning on a 173 would make it harder than it needs to be and might lead to frustration.
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:23 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Ditto with what others have said. I hate to break the news but 173 is REALLY big, and will make learning much harder. Based off general board specs, I'd say 158 - 161 is prolly ideal size for you. If you haven't read the equipment sticky yet, it may be of some help.

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Old 12-02-2008, 09:46 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Thanks all for the info.

I am actually trying to get out of the board since the guy advertised it as a 163, I told him I would pay for his re-listing fees. If I can get out of it, I was looking at a Burton Mayhem wide 159. The board I took lessons on was a Burton 155 and the instructor said that I was doing great on it. It felt comfortable and I really didn't have any issues with it. I was thinking on going with Mission bindings...again, what do you guys think?

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Jeff
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:47 AM   #7 (permalink)
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What kind of surface do you normally ride on? If you're out west and you have some deep pow (we will eventually, I hope) that board will come in handy as you get better. If you're learning on it on icy groomed runs or crud, you will struggle a little bit. You may consider renting until you are a pretty solid at linking turns. I don't know how far you've gotten skill-wise, but starting with lessons was a good idea. If you feel fairly comfortable on the slopes, that board MIGHT be ok for you. If you're still really sketchy, it might hold you back a bit. I don't think it is the end of the world to have a long board, but it might take a little longer to get it under control.

EDIT: Posted a second too late, didn't I?

What kind of riding do you plan on doing? That has the biggest impact on the bindings you choose. You'll want stiffer bindings for riding on the mountain and soft ones if you plan on hitting the park or landing jumps. (Eventually, obviously)
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Old 12-02-2008, 10:34 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Flick,

I don't plan on doing any jumps, I plan on doing mountian riding.

In my lesson, i was able to link turns together and do heel stops, I felt pretty comfortable onthe board. I am sure that I will improve more when my legs get into better shape. Let me know what you think.

Thanks

Jeff
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:15 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Flick,

I re-read my last post and it almost sounds as if I had an attitude, I can assure you that it was not meant to sound like I have an attitude. I am just looking to all you experts for advice. There sure are a lot of boards, bindings, and boots out there. I don't want to spend a lot of money but also don't want to get stuck with something that is not a good setup.

I see that there are all-mountain boards, free-style boards, park boards, and others. I would think that I would want to stick with an all-mountain board. My shoe size is 10.5 so from what I understand, I would want a wide board. It seemed that the board I took my lessons on my toes were digging into the snow on toe side turns.

I plan on going boarding again on Dec 21 and would like to have a setup by then.

Thanks again for all your help!

Sincerely,

Jeff
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:20 PM   #10 (permalink)
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If you have big feet but don't want a wide board look into getting bindings that have a toe lift. It will keep your toes from hitting the snow when you turn.
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