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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-10-2014 04:12 PM
speedjason you need speed to dig in the edges and make the board flex to turn hard.
also the transition is very important. the more perpendicular to the slope, the smoother the transition needs to be or your board just gonna chatter.
02-10-2014 02:47 PM
lambar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesX View Post
Weight doesn't have much to do with it other than determining the size of your board.

one problem, which I had when I started, is the terror of that moment when you straighten out your board and is starting to gain speed and yet don't have the balance to fully commit to an edge. You just see that giant lake miles down the slope looming.

That fear caused me to shift my weight on my hind leg and makes turning even worse. I ended up having to maintain an iron grip on my front pant leg to force myself to stay forward leaning. Just took a short while after that to realize it isn't as scary as it seemed.

Maybe that will help you as well.
I think this was my experience the other day for sure. I'll definitely make the conscious effort to not lean back when picking up speed down a steeper hill.
02-10-2014 02:20 PM
JamesX Weight doesn't have much to do with it other than determining the size of your board.

one problem, which I had when I started, is the terror of that moment when you straighten out your board and is starting to gain speed and yet don't have the balance to fully commit to an edge. You just see that giant lake miles down the slope looming.

That fear caused me to shift my weight on my hind leg and makes turning even worse. I ended up having to maintain an iron grip on my front pant leg to force myself to stay forward leaning. Just took a short while after that to realize it isn't as scary as it seemed.

Maybe that will help you as well.
02-09-2014 03:52 PM
Donutz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crankthat View Post
I sat on the snow out of the way towards the top and waited for somebody with slightly better skills then me and followed there lines and moves to the best of my ability.
As the day progressed and I mimicked more people that had a better idea then me my skills climbed very quickly compared to the first people I followed.
I've done this too. Works great. Just make sure you don't follow the same group twice in a row, you may get reported for stalking.
02-09-2014 12:22 PM
Crankthat Most moving from the flatter terrain have not really learned to dig in the edge of the board yet.
This is because you need a bit of speed to dig it in.
On the beginner terrain you learn your balance for the most part.
See the curves on the front of your board.
While learning to stop flex a bit of weight on that front curve and bend the knees to add some weight on the total edge.
As you put/flex some weight on that curve the snowboard will pull you in that direction.
Now as it starts turning you need to dig the rest of the edge in while putting weight on it by more flex of the knees, lean down and over the top of your body also and add weight for faster stops.
Getting the board sideways with the upslope edge firmly dug in.
While learning to ride my first day of transition from the bunny slopes was difficult indeed.
My next trip out I had a plan and it worked great.

I sat on the snow out of the way towards the top and waited for somebody with slightly better skills then me and followed there lines and moves to the best of my ability.
As the day progressed and I mimicked more people that had a better idea then me my skills climbed very quickly compared to the first people I followed.

I agree with the post that most people are to stiff at first.
A lot of people are to stiff to advance even after they have become [U]good[U]riders.

It is my opinion that the people who know how to bend and loosen up the most and are not afraid to hold their hand over there heads and still skim the snow with it have the best control.
02-09-2014 12:21 PM
chomps1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by schroern View Post
So of course I replied, "Hell yeah, free food."

Thanks for the tips guys. Towards the end of the night I was getting better at looking where I wanted to go. Which really helped. Excited to go again next weekend and work on everything more.
Cool! Yeah, you know there's no need to rush going fast. Get comfortable and confident with your skill level and speed will come as a natural result. Not that you shouldn't push your limits at times to progress. But knowing where your limits are, can help you avoid getting injured over a stupid mistake.

Sounds like you're doing just fine.
02-09-2014 11:53 AM
schroern
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomps1211 View Post
+1. Lol!
...I was asked, "You wanna go shred?" I heard, "You wanna get Fed!"
So of course I replied, "Hell yeah, free food."

Thanks for the tips guys. Towards the end of the night I was getting better at looking where I wanted to go. Which really helped. Excited to go again next weekend and work on everything more.
02-09-2014 11:13 AM
lambar
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilWithin View Post
Here are a few basic tips that I found helped me:
1) Stretch and exercise your legs, back, shoulders and neck regularly - this helps when you're on the mountain. Using your own body weight for squats, etc helps a lot...no need for heavy weight lifting. Throw in some cardio so you don't tire as easily at altitude. Getting sore and tired is main reason people crash.
2) Relax your shoulders...don't tense up.
3) Maintain good posture - when you are new there is a tendency to bend over forward at the waist, which throws off your balance. Push out your belly button and pull in the small of your back to keep good posture. If you get tired...take a break until this feels natural.
4) In the beginning, keep your eyes focused ahead and where you want to go. Don't look at your feet to see if you are engaging your edge...you will fall. Keep your head up and ride in a confident posture.
5) Make sure you always have 51% of your weight on your front foot - don't ride on your back foot.
6) Put pressure on the tongue of your boot to engage your toe-side turns.
7) Check to make sure your bindings are set up properly (no toe or heel drag). Lace up your boots without your feet in them and place them in your bindings. Ratchet your bindings on them and look to make sure they are centered on your board without too much overhang on either side.

Most importantly, get a lesson! The instructor will be able to help you with all of this a lot faster than you can figure out on your own.

Good luck!
Thank for the great tips. We have had two lessons so far and have another one planned this week so hoping for some more progress!
02-09-2014 09:17 AM
DevilWithin Here are a few basic tips that I found helped me:
1) Stretch and exercise your legs, back, shoulders and neck regularly - this helps when you're on the mountain. Using your own body weight for squats, etc helps a lot...no need for heavy weight lifting. Throw in some cardio so you don't tire as easily at altitude. Getting sore and tired is main reason people crash.
2) Relax your shoulders...don't tense up.
3) Maintain good posture - when you are new there is a tendency to bend over forward at the waist, which throws off your balance. Push out your belly button and pull in the small of your back to keep good posture. If you get tired...take a break until this feels natural.
4) In the beginning, keep your eyes focused ahead and where you want to go. Don't look at your feet to see if you are engaging your edge...you will fall. Keep your head up and ride in a confident posture.
5) Make sure you always have 51% of your weight on your front foot - don't ride on your back foot.
6) Put pressure on the tongue of your boot to engage your toe-side turns.
7) Check to make sure your bindings are set up properly (no toe or heel drag). Lace up your boots without your feet in them and place them in your bindings. Ratchet your bindings on them and look to make sure they are centered on your board without too much overhang on either side.

Most importantly, get a lesson! The instructor will be able to help you with all of this a lot faster than you can figure out on your own.

Good luck!
02-09-2014 09:05 AM
chomps1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
Skinny people can't snowboard, proven fact, that's why I'm so awesome at it.....
+1. Lol!
...I was asked, "You wanna go shred?" I heard, "You wanna get Fed!"
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