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Thread: How To Buy, Choose & Size The Perfect Snowboard For You Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Today 07:34 AM
Wiredsport Hi Syn,

Yes, those are larger than we would like to see. Your foot is smaller than that insert. When we get you down to your Mondo size your foot will overhang the insert by ~ 1 cm. That is typical. 27.5 cm is a size 9.5 in snowboard boots.

STOKED!
Today 04:11 AM
Synathidy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Hi Syn,

It sounds like you are having a great time riding and are advancing quickly. That is always awesome to hear! Riders mention boots a lot because they do have a huge impact on performance. No intention to cool your stoke on this end. Snowboard boots are intended to fit very differently from other footwear. Just touching the end of the liner typically indicates at least one full size too large. We look for firm pressure (both toe and heel) into the compliant materials of the liner. This usually feels very odd or wrong to a new rider but soon anything else will feel incorrect. That firm pressure is what hold your foot in place and with a heat fit allows for a massive increase in performance.

If you want to pull the inserts from your liners, stand on them with your heels back in the heel indents and take/post some photos I will be happy to have a look.

9.5 cm wide in this size range is very narrow. If correct, that is a C width even at size 9.5. That will not be our issue.

For measurement I suggest just touching the wall with your heel and fully weighting that foot.

Boots typically pack out for roughly 2 weeks of riding days. 1 cm (one full foot size) of pack out is typical.
Hey, Wired-dude, sorry this took me so long. I had a crazy week of school. But here are foot pix with the liner of my current boot, if you are still generous enough to offer your opinion. I think I already know what you're going to say: that they look too big. I've also tried on my boots a few times more lately, more conscious than I was before of just how much room I have in there. The boa system allows a very nice, tight fit around my feet in general, but I think I'm finding that when I bend my knees down into "snowboard stance," my toes really aren't pressuring the toe box at all; rather, they just very lightly touch.

Anyway, I also measured my length again in the way you advised. I feel pretty confidant now my foot size is very close to 27.5 cm (definitely not any smaller than that). Based on the things I've now discovered with careful observation, I'm thinking I wouldn't want to go any bigger than size 10 with the next boots I buy. I believe my proper mondo size would be 9.5 (based on 27.5 cm), but I'm a bit nervous about downsizing that much.
04-19-2017 04:35 PM
Synathidy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Hi Syn,

It sounds like you are having a great time riding and are advancing quickly. That is always awesome to hear! Riders mention boots a lot because they do have a huge impact on performance. No intention to cool your stoke on this end. Snowboard boots are intended to fit very differently from other footwear. Just touching the end of the liner typically indicates at least one full size too large. We look for firm pressure (both toe and heel) into the compliant materials of the liner. This usually feels very odd or wrong to a new rider but soon anything else will feel incorrect. That firm pressure is what hold your foot in place and with a heat fit allows for a massive increase in performance.

If you want to pull the inserts from your liners, stand on them with your heels back in the heel indents and take/post some photos I will be happy to have a look.

9.5 cm wide in this size range is very narrow. If correct, that is a C width even at size 9.5. That will not be our issue.

For measurement I suggest just touching the wall with your heel and fully weighting that foot.

Boots typically pack out for roughly 2 weeks of riding days. 1 cm (one full foot size) of pack out is typical.
Kind of you to offer, dude. I may check that out (foot on insert test), but not immediately. I'm busy working in university labs all day (that's where I am now). And thanks very much for the advice regarding my somewhat retarded question on foot length determination, LOL.

Even though I've had no issues as of yet with my boots and everything feels great (despite the size departing so far from mondo size), it's good to think about these things, as no doubt there will be a time (maybe very soon if packing out happens to a greater extent) when I desire new boots. Or maybe I'll want a slightly stiffer flexing boot someday. I'm already thinking and planning about it with the help of forum posters like yourself, and I think it's quite likely that I'll want to try sizing down at least a full size in the next pair I try.

Too bad I won't get to continue my experimental "pack-in" period until next winter... I swear, I've never been more ready for winter to start again just as it's ending. I've become "snow-borderline" obsessed with this hobby. Ba-doom ching.
04-19-2017 01:34 PM
Wiredsport
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synathidy View Post
Hey, dude, I read through your entire thread about boot sizing. It was an interesting read for me, since I am intent on (I'd say even passionate about) having well-fitting gear. To be honest, it bothers me a bit that some people have told me my boots are too big for me, but pragmatically, I've snowboarded in them 6 times and they've felt great. My toes just touch the ends, and my heels are held very firmly with no heel lift that I can notice. They feel extremely comfy and I don't think I've had any performance issues related to having too-large boots (I'm sort of a beginner-intermediate snowboarder, and feel I've been progressing wonderfully - plus having a great time). Then again, I may just be new, naive, and not able to know the difference between the performance of slightly-too-large boots and tighter-fitting ones. I also don't know if six (full) days of riding is long enough to get a sense of the "packing-out effect." You think they could pack out a lot more and then I may curse the day I bought size 11 boots?

But to answer about the width: I just measured by putting each foot sidelong against a wall and measuring out to the widest point. The measurement I got for both is very close to 9.5 cm.

And forgive this somewhat retarded question, but... durrr... how exactly is foot length measured? See, I've tried planting my foot against a wall and measuring out from there, but I've gotten measurements varying up to a full centimeter (sometimes even a little more!) due to having my foot either really pressed up firmly against the wall, or just lightly touching. I also wonder if the time of day I measure makes a difference. I'd guess it could if one has been on their feet all day.
Hi Syn,

It sounds like you are having a great time riding and are advancing quickly. That is always awesome to hear! Riders mention boots a lot because they do have a huge impact on performance. No intention to cool your stoke on this end. Snowboard boots are intended to fit very differently from other footwear. Just touching the end of the liner typically indicates at least one full size too large. We look for firm pressure (both toe and heel) into the compliant materials of the liner. This usually feels very odd or wrong to a new rider but soon anything else will feel incorrect. That firm pressure is what hold your foot in place and with a heat fit allows for a massive increase in performance.

If you want to pull the inserts from your liners, stand on them with your heels back in the heel indents and take/post some photos I will be happy to have a look.

9.5 cm wide in this size range is very narrow. If correct, that is a C width even at size 9.5. That will not be our issue.

For measurement I suggest just touching the wall with your heel and fully weighting that foot.

Boots typically pack out for roughly 2 weeks of riding days. 1 cm (one full foot size) of pack out is typical.
04-19-2017 01:00 PM
Synathidy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Hi Syn,

You may want to measure your barefoot width as well. 26.5-27.5 cm should never be in Mondo 29 (size 11).

STOKED!
Hey, dude, I read through your entire thread about boot sizing. It was an interesting read for me, since I am intent on (I'd say even passionate about) having well-fitting gear. To be honest, it bothers me a bit that some people have told me my boots are too big for me, but pragmatically, I've snowboarded in them 6 times and they've felt great. My toes just touch the ends, and my heels are held very firmly with no heel lift that I can notice. They feel extremely comfy and I don't think I've had any performance issues related to having too-large boots (I'm sort of a beginner-intermediate snowboarder, and feel I've been progressing wonderfully - plus having a great time). Then again, I may just be new, naive, and not able to know the difference between the performance of slightly-too-large boots and tighter-fitting ones. I also don't know if six (full) days of riding is long enough to get a sense of the "packing-out effect." You think they could pack out a lot more and then I may curse the day I bought size 11 boots?

But to answer about the width: I just measured by putting each foot sidelong against a wall and measuring out to the widest point. The measurement I got for both is very close to 9.5 cm.

And forgive this somewhat retarded question, but... durrr... how exactly is foot length measured? See, I've tried planting my foot against a wall and measuring out from there, but I've gotten measurements varying up to a full centimeter (sometimes even a little more!) due to having my foot either really pressed up firmly against the wall, or just lightly touching. I also wonder if the time of day I measure makes a difference. I'd guess it could if one has been on their feet all day.
04-19-2017 12:23 PM
Wiredsport
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synathidy View Post
Well, evidently certain boots run small, because I tried on some Burton boots of size 10, 10.5, and 11, in person, and the size 10 boots REALLY caused my toes to crumple up uncomfortably, even after trying to bump my heel on the floor to scoot them back. My toes were pushing up against even the size 11 boots I've been wearing when I first got them. After riding in them for several full days, they packed out a little and now feel perfect.

I'm aware that my cm foot measurement doesn't normally correspond to a size 11 boot, but for this particular boot of mine, size 11 is what fits. Maybe when the time comes to buy new boots of a different model, it'll turn out that a smaller size accurately fits my feet, but that's definitely not so with these ones. There's no way in hell that my feet would fit in 8.5 size boots of the kind I'm now using, based on what I've actually tried on.

I'm interested in what you said about directional twin, though. Why would that be beneficial for riding switch? Wouldn't any stance setback or asymmetrical flexibility make it more awkward/difficult to ride the other way?

Edit: I actually just measured my feet again to double check, more exactly by standing normally and marking lines on paper, and they could be called 27~27.5 cm.
Anyway, I'd still like to hear what anyone thinks of my length question (in my last post). I go back and forth, thinking about it. It torments me so. orz
Hi Syn,

You may want to measure your barefoot width as well. 26.5-27.5 cm should never be in Mondo 29 (size 11).

STOKED!
04-15-2017 04:01 AM
Synathidy
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
Shoe size is a much bigger issue for you than board length: A 26.5cm foot corresponds to a US8.5 snowboard boot.

And you definitely don't need a true twin to learn switch. Arguably a directional twin is better for that.
Well, evidently certain boots run small, because I tried on some Burton boots of size 10, 10.5, and 11, in person, and the size 10 boots REALLY caused my toes to crumple up uncomfortably, even after trying to bump my heel on the floor to scoot them back. My toes were pushing up against even the size 11 boots I've been wearing when I first got them. After riding in them for several full days, they packed out a little and now feel perfect.

I'm aware that my cm foot measurement doesn't normally correspond to a size 11 boot, but for this particular boot of mine, size 11 is what fits. Maybe when the time comes to buy new boots of a different model, it'll turn out that a smaller size accurately fits my feet, but that's definitely not so with these ones. There's no way in hell that my feet would fit in 8.5 size boots of the kind I'm now using, based on what I've actually tried on.

I'm interested in what you said about directional twin, though. Why would that be beneficial for riding switch? Wouldn't any stance setback or asymmetrical flexibility make it more awkward/difficult to ride the other way?

Edit: I actually just measured my feet again to double check, more exactly by standing normally and marking lines on paper, and they could be called 27~27.5 cm.
Anyway, I'd still like to hear what anyone thinks of my length question (in my last post). I go back and forth, thinking about it. It torments me so. orz
04-15-2017 03:40 AM
GreyDragon
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
Shoe size is a much bigger issue for you than board length: A 26.5cm foot corresponds to a US8.5 snowboard boot.

And you definitely don't need a true twin to learn switch. Arguably a directional twin is better for that.
How is a directional twin better for riding switch than a true twin?
I can understand that a directional twin is sufficient for riding switch, but not better than a true twin.
04-15-2017 03:30 AM
SGboarder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synathidy View Post
So I have some inner conflict about snowboard sizing...

First, a brief run-down of my snowboarding profile:
Age 27 (not growing anymore)
Height: 6'3"
Weight: 130 lb
Feet size: 26.5 cm (and I wear size 11 Burton Highline BOAs)
Stance: +15/-15, 22 inches apart
Experience: Intermediate
Riding preference: I really just like cruising down the mountain in general. I really love it when I can go through some patches of powder, and I'd be open to learning a few little trick techniques later, once I'm more experienced (180s, little jumps, etc.).

Now my issue is regarding board length. I know the prevailing advice by those in the know is to go by weight, but this isn't quite cut-and-dry with my great height and light weight. I bought my first board used, an old Sims Quest 160. Before settling on it, I had visited all of the shops carrying snowboards/gear in my town, and (to my surprise), they all recommended I size my board by height (no less than ~157 cm), and NOT weight, even when I specifically asked about the height vs. weight methods. Ultimately, I bought my 160 cm board because, even though most any size guide online will recommend me a board a bit shorter than this for a 130 lb person, it was the only used (i.e. cheap enough for me to afford) board I could find which was wide enough for my feet. Plus the board was in nice condition. It's served me well so far (though I've never been on a shorter board and don't know if that might feel better or not).

Looking at board specs online, a similar issue can be found, as sometimes my weight will place me in the recommended range for a very short length that doesn't come in a wide option and is too narrow for my size 11 boots. Maximum stance width is potentially an issue as well, as I would like to have the option to widen my bindings by an inch or two should I want to experiment (24~25 inches, ideally). So you see, long legs and normal feet size for a 6'3" person often clash with my weight when I go to size a board by a website or company's guidelines. So how should I size a board? Is there a limit to the "go by weight" rule for someone who's very tall and very light? Or should I ignore the stark difference between my tall, lanky frame and the shorter board length which fits my weight. It seems a little strange for a 6'3" person to ride on a 150 cm or less board, but would that probably be easier and more enjoyable for me?

I ask about this because I know I'll someday want to invest in a brand new true-twin board (because I really want to learn to ride switch) for all-mountain snowboarding, perhaps as soon as for next season. The board I have (a directional twin, I believe - could be mistaken) works great and I love it, but I'm pretty insistent on having a true twin (totally symmetrical flex and no stance setback) when I upgrade.
Shoe size is a much bigger issue for you than board length: A 26.5cm foot corresponds to a US8.5 snowboard boot.

And you definitely don't need a true twin to learn switch. Arguably a directional twin is better for that.
04-15-2017 02:15 AM
Synathidy So I have some inner conflict about snowboard sizing...

First, a brief run-down of my snowboarding profile:
Age 27 (not growing anymore)
Height: 6'3"
Weight: 130 lb
Feet size: 26.5 cm (and I wear size 11 Burton Highline BOAs)
Stance: +15/-15, 22 inches apart
Experience: Intermediate
Riding preference: I really just like cruising down the mountain in general. I really love it when I can go through some patches of powder, and I'd be open to learning a few little trick techniques later, once I'm more experienced (180s, little jumps, etc.).

Now my issue is regarding board length. I know the prevailing advice by those in the know is to go by weight, but this isn't quite cut-and-dry with my great height and light weight. I bought my first board used, an old Sims Quest 160. Before settling on it, I had visited all of the shops carrying snowboards/gear in my town, and (to my surprise), they all recommended I size my board by height (no less than ~157 cm), and NOT weight, even when I specifically asked about the height vs. weight methods. Ultimately, I bought my 160 cm board because, even though most any size guide online will recommend me a board a bit shorter than this for a 130 lb person, it was the only used (i.e. cheap enough for me to afford) board I could find which was wide enough for my feet. Plus the board was in nice condition. It's served me well so far (though I've never been on a shorter board and don't know if that might feel better or not).

Looking at board specs online, a similar issue can be found, as sometimes my weight will place me in the recommended range for a very short length that doesn't come in a wide option and is too narrow for my size 11 boots. Maximum stance width is potentially an issue as well, as I would like to have the option to widen my bindings by an inch or two should I want to experiment (24~25 inches, ideally). So you see, long legs and normal feet size for a 6'3" person often clash with my weight when I go to size a board by a website or company's guidelines. So how should I size a board? Is there a limit to the "go by weight" rule for someone who's very tall and very light? Or should I ignore the stark difference between my tall, lanky frame and the shorter board length which fits my weight. It seems a little strange for a 6'3" person to ride on a 150 cm or less board, but would that probably be easier and more enjoyable for me?

I ask about this because I know I'll someday want to invest in a brand new true-twin board (because I really want to learn to ride switch) for all-mountain snowboarding, perhaps as soon as for next season. The board I have (a directional twin, I believe - could be mistaken) works great and I love it, but I'm pretty insistent on having a true twin (totally symmetrical flex and no stance setback) when I upgrade.
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