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03-15-2014 08:48 PM
the grouch When I got to the local hill with my kids yesterday it was icy/slushy. Then it started to snow -we got probably four or five inches the last couple hours we were there- and it was awesome. Most people were gone, so plenty of fresh snow to go around. But even the parts that gor tracked were fun. The snow was light though, so you could plow through the big mounds.
03-15-2014 07:54 PM
jjz I dont know if this is the problem your having, but 3 years ago, the first time I rode out west, I had a lot of trouble riding on powder covered moguls and was basically bailing every 10 seconds.

I got a lesson, and my problem was instead of riding from my ankles and knees I was riding with my upper body. As a result, every time I hit a bump, my upper body would go flying.

I started riding with my ankles and knees rather than my ass and hips, and my problem was solved: Ride with your ankles and Knees, it may help to get an instructor to help you with this.

Another thing I was taught last year which improved my carving over bumps (and carving on groomers and pretty much all riding) 1000 percent was really, really focusing on keeping my pelvis thrusted forward.
03-15-2014 05:44 PM
F1EA
Quote:
Originally Posted by behi View Post
Bumpy??? You are kidding, right?

Quite frankly, I would call that very well groomed and smooth.
Nope, it's bumpy. Not the usual 2ft craters found on steep blacks, but more or less what the OP is talking about. Also, it is defintely bumpier than it looks because of the lighting.

You can call it smooth and very well groomed though. Some people would call that powder too
03-15-2014 05:30 PM
CassMT i go at it two ways, as needed...go all noodly and just make turns as if the irregularities weren't even there, just power over them the faster the better. Or, use the terrain to help you turn, looking downhill and picking spots to nail and edge into. i was teaching my kid on some fresh fallen choppy gunk today, he was struggling turning or just sideslipping. when i told him to ignore the chop, pretend it was a smooth hill and relax he started to do waaay better
03-15-2014 04:45 PM
behi
Quote:
Originally Posted by F1EA View Post
Here's a small clip of me going down a bumpy bit on a blue run in soft slush spring-like conditions, no new snow in a few days.
Bumpy??? You are kidding, right?

Quite frankly, I would call that very well groomed and smooth.
03-15-2014 03:15 PM
Bones
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfinsnow View Post
I. But bumps on ice, that's when it gets really tough, because you're never really able to lay an edge, you're relying on hitting the bumps to make your turns.
To be fair to the OP, that's what it was: very hard pack\ice with some crudded up loose on top. Edge hold was pretty variable. If you turn by leaning your body, then yeah, you were going to get surprised.
03-15-2014 02:29 PM
wrathfuldeity
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
There was new snow and it did get a little lumpy, but we only got 2 inches over the day.
^OP that aint heavy snow fall....2 inches/hour is more like heavy snow fall...and that is when the turons and pussies go home and leave the glorious puke to for the rest of us to get our orgy on.
03-15-2014 02:23 PM
F1EA Ahhh them skiers love bumps......

1. Dont focus on speed, focus on a line instead.
2. Plan a couple turns ahead, try not to change your mind last minute (ie commit). This is why most people fall.
3. SOFT and relaxed knees. The other reason people fall.
4. A whole lot of mixed type of turns, but mostly pivot/rudder type turns where you lift your rear foot slightly.
5. Use your edges to slice through a few of the bumps, jump a few others...
6. Spray skiers.

Here's a small clip of me going down a bumpy bit on a blue run in soft slush spring-like conditions, no new snow in a few days. Not really blasting it or anything, as I was waiting for a friend... I'm not really good, but i guess a bit better than people who are bad at it



I totally HATE Hard packed bumps on steep black runs. It's just not fun for me.
03-15-2014 01:49 PM
surfinsnow In my experience, alot of has to do with picking a line -- a line usually just 10-15 feet in front of you. Don't expect to bomb it because then you'll just get frustrated, sore, and airborne when you don't want to be. If it's fresh, dry snow you can often plow through those bumps (knock 'em down a bit!). Otherwise, focus on your next turn, which will be somewhere between the next couple of bumps. It's def a different kind of riding. Having grown up surfing, I kind of like it as long as the bumps aren't just on a bed of ice. You can get a really fun "surfy" feel, kickin' off the lip of little east coast waves. But bumps on ice, that's when it gets really tough, because you're never really able to lay an edge, you're relying on hitting the bumps to make your turns. That's killer on the legs and will shorten your day. I'd say "get used to it" and adapt since you ride the east coast. I've seen many great powder days ruined by 5mph skiers just turning the mountain into a mogul field by 10:00 am. The key is get your head into a different space, accept that it's a different challenge that will ultimately increase your skills...grasshopper.
03-15-2014 01:43 PM
Noreaster
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
hmmm snow on groomers, welcome to riding in pseudo-real conditions.

time to learn how to slow down and turn and do it all dynamically instead of just seeing how fast you can bomb a packed groomer.
Ha haha.

That being said, this thread inspired me to tape my cracked rib some time next week and see what the packed groomers are all about. I hear thems the shits.
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