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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Yesterday 08:15 PM
Oldman Let us know if you are able to "keep your distance" with this one.

Not going to spoil any of it for you. Enjoy
Yesterday 07:06 PM
neni
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldman View Post
Note to Neni:

Bring a BIG box of Kleenex for the Pyjama story.

Have a great weekend.
Did you like it? Got it cos it was listed in the "ppl also bought" when buying The Book Thief. If it's anything like that one? I was crying several times reading that one - which I actually rarely do.

Uhm... K... I did weep when Artrax drowned. And when they shot Cisco. Or when the truck hit Pilgrim. Oh, and when they sold Clover to the glue factory, that was the worst! Yes, there's a pattern...
Usually, if it comes to ppl, I can keep enough distance. But with the Book Thief it was very different. Probably because of its protagonists innocence . Ah well, I'll fetch a box of Kleenex...
Yesterday 04:50 PM
BoardieK I'm a Sci-Fi fan; favourite book has to be Ilium by Dan Simmons.

wikipedia: the first part of the Ilium/Olympos cycle, concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad on an alternate Earth and Mars. These events are set in motion by beings who have taken on the roles of the Greek gods. The novel is a form of "literary science fiction" which relies heavily on intertextuality, in this case with Homer and Shakespeare, as well as periodic references to Marcel Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu

It's actually quite funny as well as a bit mind blowing!
Yesterday 12:07 PM
Oldman Note to Neni:

Bring a BIG box of Kleenex for the Pyjama story.

Have a great weekend.
05-24-2017 11:18 AM
neni Geared up for the public holiday
Happy long Ascension day weekend everybody
01-18-2017 11:59 AM
freshy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter_Lion View Post
The Ender Series by Orson Scott Card and the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S.Lewis...

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I absolutely love the Ender series, it was the first series I'm which I finished a book and went to a book store that day to keep going with the next, and next, and next.

Also Hitch Hikers Guide To The Galaxy has to be up there with my faves.

The Hunger Games series was another great read believe it or not.
01-18-2017 07:50 AM
Trabi75
Quote:
Originally Posted by neni View Post
Amazon.de
Many of the titles I've mentioned are originally in German so get them in the original language . Right now I'm reading The Crystal Mountain by Reinhold Messner in English and it feels so stupid cos I hear his voice and dialect in my head. Should have gotten it in German.

Also get Buntschatten und Fledermäuse by Axel Brauns. Amazing book written by an autistic, about his perception of things. Very funny as well.
And get Die Ameise als Tramp by Bernhard Kegel. Such a good writer, it's such a pity this book doesn't get more attention. Very good non-fiction introduction into how we humen have affected entire ecosystems by introducing new species intentionally and unintentionally. Both are not translated into English that's why I hadn't listed them in my first post, but they would belong there.


If you enjoy mountaineering stories, try Joe Simpson (e.g. Touching the Void or The Beckoning Silence); way funnier/more entertaining to read than Krakauer or Harrer.(I loved the stories of both, but their writing style is bit stiff).
Thanks Neni,I'll check those books out. funny how you can get used to a style and when there is a different version i.e. translation you have a hard time adjusting. I've had that experience a few times too but it does help with second languages to go back and forth.

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01-17-2017 11:29 PM
neni
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trabi75 View Post
Currently looking for some good modern German language books. Neni sounds like you could help in that regard. Is there somewhere I can download ebooks in German? I would like to try out some more modern authors to catch back up on my German slang.
Amazon.de
Many of the titles I've mentioned are originally in German so get them in the original language . Right now I'm reading The Crystal Mountain by Reinhold Messner in English and it feels so stupid cos I hear his voice and dialect in my head. Should have gotten it in German.

Also get Buntschatten und Fledermäuse by Axel Brauns. Amazing book written by an autistic, about his perception of things. Very funny as well.
And get Die Ameise als Tramp by Bernhard Kegel. Such a good writer, it's such a pity this book doesn't get more attention. Very good non-fiction introduction into how we humen have affected entire ecosystems by introducing new species intentionally and unintentionally. Both are not translated into English that's why I hadn't listed them in my first post, but they would belong there.


If you enjoy mountaineering stories, try Joe Simpson (e.g. Touching the Void or The Beckoning Silence); way funnier/more entertaining to read than Krakauer or Harrer.(I loved the stories of both, but their writing style is bit stiff).
01-17-2017 08:41 PM
david_z oh boy this might be interesting. I've got a rack of boring academically-minded stuff (most of which I've read or at least surveyed) but wouldn't make much of a "favorites" list haha. I don't read a lot of non-fiction, or rather, haven't in quite some time.

History/Non-Fiction/Etc

Gulag Archipelago, Solzhenitsyn -- want a grim and complete survey of the Soviet Gulag system? Not really light reading, a macabre page-turner IMO
Execution by Hunger, Dolot -- yay more anti-Soviet stuff, only this time it's about how they force-starved around 7 million Ukrainians
The Master Switch, Wu -- This one is admittedly dry and academic even by my own standards but really is a fascinating synopsis of the information age, its major players, and landscape
Life, Inc., Rushkoff -- takes a look at modern consumer culture, its roots, etc.
Propaganda, Bernays -- interesting overview of the methods by which propaganda/marketing shape our opinions/wants.
The Divide, Taibbi -- case studies in American inequality. I've read a few of his other works as well, but don't want to clutter it.
Dynamite: The Story of Class Violence In America, Adamic -- historical review of major labor struggles in America
Anti-Trust & Monopoly, Armentano -- re-examination of some landmark antitrust rulings, contrary conclusions
Downhill Slide: Why the Corporate Ski Industry is Bad for Skiing, Ski Towns, and the Environment -- interesting look at the development of the corporate ski industry

Literature/Fiction

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Heinlein -- this was actually my first foray in to "sci-fi" and I bought it purely on a whim/unsolicited recommendation from someone I follow on Facebook. I couldn't put it down. Have not had as much luck with other samples of that genre or author (Stranger in a Strange land was just okay, whereas Time Enough For Love I really struggled to keep interested, and don't think I ever finished it).
Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck -- I mean this kinda has to make the list though it's been ~20 years since I read it in high school. There's comparatively few of the "classics" that I had to read in high school/college that would make this list. This might be the only one, if only I could remember a few of the others...

Oh hell, these are the sorts of lists where tomorrow I'll remember another 5 or 6 books, but I'm drawing a blank here especially in the fiction department.
01-17-2017 08:03 PM
Trabi75
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo maestro View Post
How about Heinrich Harrer? Author of 'Seven Years In Tibet' and 'The White Spider'......the latter, being the story of the north face of the Eiger.......
Seen the movies but not read the books. Good idea. speaking of mountain books. I've read Into Thin Air by Krakauer and Der Gipfel (don't remember the English title, Summit or something'. I bought the German translation last time I was in Germany) that tells Boukreevs side of the story of the everest tragedy in 96. Both good. I still side with Krakauer more

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