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Thread: getting to know stance is too narrow and finetuning it Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-26-2011 01:33 AM
kimchijajonshim
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
other question: Union binding give you the chance to fine-tune your stance width. Than means that once you put both bindings on even holes (for example, reference point), you can then move each binding independently
True Fit | Union Binding Company

Should also these little movements be symmetrical (ie, moving bindings on opposite direction)? Or, once the 2 bindings are on exact holes, I can play with them and move them both on the same direction for example?

thanks a lot in advance
You don't have to have them symmetrical. But you may change your set-back on your board. If your move both bindings out or inward, you are adding or subtracting an inch to your stance width (1/2" both sides). If you leave the front binding in the center and move the back binding all the way back, you are setting yourself 1/4" back from whatever insert setback you're on. Or you can move both of them back to give yourself an additional 1/2" of setback. Just depends what you're looking for. I generally move them symmetrically unless I'm in pow and am looking for as much set-back as I can manage.
01-25-2011 03:32 AM
lorcar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
other question: Union binding give you the chance to fine-tune your stance width. Than means that once you put both bindings on even holes (for example, reference point), you can then move each binding independently
True Fit | Union Binding Company

Should also these little movements be symmetrical (ie, moving bindings on opposite direction)? Or, once the 2 bindings are on exact holes, I can play with them and move them both on the same direction for example?

thanks a lot in advance
anyone on this?
01-24-2011 04:10 PM
veazer sry... my comment was semi-retarted... Basically saying that if the reference points are moved back a half-inch, then you're at a disadvantage riding switch, because they'd be moved forward a half inch, toward a smaller, stiffer end. Then again, if your binding angles aren't equally ducked, then could it be easier to ride switch on a directional board with bindings setup as like +12/-6, when regular, therefore 6/-12 when switch, as opposed to +9/-9 both ways?

i'm not really sure if that makes any more sense though...
01-24-2011 03:18 PM
Leo
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
Thanks

but to be honest, I dont think I did this! did I write I set my stance forward???
You stated that you had a directional board that you centered your stance on. That means you set your stance forward.

@Outlyr: Setting your stance back, even just the rear foot, is alright. In fact, if you have a positive cambered board, the further you set your stance back, the more float you will have in powder.

@Veazer: To be honest, I don't really understand what you are asking. When centering your stance on a directional board, the best way for me to describe it is that it handles like your riding switch when you are regular. So I guess that would mean it will handle better if you in fact ride switch on that setup? Either way, it makes 0 sense for you to do that.

The Operator is not a directional twin. It is a true directional board. The board's geometry is centered around the reference stance points. For example, the most narrow section of the board will be in the middle of the reference point. The flex pattern will be centered around the reference point. There's other things like where, if any, tech like carbon rods are located.

I don't know the exact technical details or exactly why it rides different. I just know that it does from personal experience and the many, many issues I have heard when people move their stance in this manner.
01-24-2011 03:02 PM
1max2nv I find shoulder width works the best for me. I stand on the board bend my knees and have my arms hang straight down. My hands would touch near the center for my knee caps. I get the best range of motion and still have enough power when I squat down to charge the hill.
01-24-2011 09:19 AM
lorcar other question: Union binding give you the chance to fine-tune your stance width. Than means that once you put both bindings on even holes (for example, reference point), you can then move each binding independently
True Fit | Union Binding Company

Should also these little movements be symmetrical (ie, moving bindings on opposite direction)? Or, once the 2 bindings are on exact holes, I can play with them and move them both on the same direction for example?

thanks a lot in advance
01-23-2011 10:42 PM
veazer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo View Post
This is the reason why you had issues with board control. Never set your stance forward on any type of board whether or not it is a true twin, directional twin, or true directional. Due to the board's geometry, you are going to have troubles riding with a stance set forward
Wouldn't that make it easier to ride switch? Or would switch be easier if you moved it from the ref. points too? I've got a burton operator wide, (refference = 21. in. stance width w/ .5 in. setback), it's a twin-tip directional, and I moved the stance forward .5 in. last year, and rode with it .25" forward today... Seemed to have control to me, albeit, im not moving it around that much.

Just wondering what physics/geometry really does have to say on the issue.
01-23-2011 03:33 PM
outlyr
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo View Post
I read in your other post that you set your stance forward on the board?

So let me get this straight... the board is directional with a 1" setback stance right? And you moved it forward 1" to center your stance?

This is the reason why you had issues with board control. Never set your stance forward on any type of board whether or not it is a true twin, directional twin, or true directional. Due to the board's geometry, you are going to have troubles riding with a stance set forward.
Leo, what about setting it back? Do you think it is a bad idea to have the front at the reference and the rear set back 1"? This is what I have my Ride DH set at, I haven't tried it out yet though.
01-23-2011 01:42 PM
lorcar I measured it right now, and I have it set at 60.5cm (23.8 inches) which is larger than my shoulder width, while distance from my kneecap to the ground is 55cm. While any guide I read on the web says that for my height (5'11'') it should be 20-21 inches.
01-23-2011 09:47 AM
lorcar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo View Post
I read in your other post that you set your stance forward on the board?

So let me get this straight... the board is directional with a 1" setback stance right? And you moved it forward 1" to center your stance?
Thanks

but to be honest, I dont think I did this! did I write I set my stance forward???
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