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Thread: Perks of a true twin? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-23-2012 10:16 PM
Jed I'd say the average rider is better off with a slightly directional snowboard over a true twin.

True twins start to gain the advantage if you do a lot of freestyle and/or ride switch often (or if you're working your way up to doing that).

Honestly, it feels a little bit better doing switch tricks on a true twin, but the difference isn't major and I'm saying this as someone who regularly spins switch 5s and up.

In the end if you get used to spinning/landing switch on a slightly directional but twin-ish shape, you can even end up preferring that feel just due to your muscle memory remembering the feeling.
11-23-2012 09:58 PM
herzogone
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
He's one of the best in the business and performing freestyle moves in that event?

I think it still stands true for the average rider a directional shape and flex board will be better in the powder while going forward. Actually this is true for Rice and the rest of the gang, but he's got the ability to overcome the limitations of the board.

People have been telling me for years I should be on a rocker board in the powder. My mad skillz allow me to rock the camber however I want on whatever I want! Ha!
I agree, I think the big reason they rode twins in Super Natural is that twins are better for riding switch in powder, which many of them did for substantial sections. And of course spins are a bit easier too.

I also agree with your main point, that the average rider probably doesn't care much about riding switch on powder days. I think it's pretty well accepted that directional boards make powder riding easier in your preferred stance (swallowtail powder boards must exist for a reason). Slightly directional twins are a compromise, making things slightly easier in the preferred stance, at a slight expense when riding switch. Riding a twin in powder means keeping most of your weight over your rear leg, which gets tiring, but riding switch allows the other leg to take a turn.

I guess I should qualify this by saying I'm probably less experienced than many here, and the current limit of my spinning ability is 180s, but I have at least ridden powder on both a directional-twin and a true-twin. I like my current board, a true-twin, because I like to ride switch a lot, even on powder days.
11-23-2012 02:42 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynaweb View Post
Well, not as much as you would think. Explain then T Rice and other SuperNatural style riders who kill it on true twins.
He's one of the best in the business and performing freestyle moves in that event?

I think it still stands true for the average rider a directional shape and flex board will be better in the powder while going forward. Actually this is true for Rice and the rest of the gang, but he's got the ability to overcome the limitations of the board.

People have been telling me for years I should be on a rocker board in the powder. My mad skillz allow me to rock the camber however I want on whatever I want! Ha!
11-23-2012 02:32 PM
dynaweb
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
The tradeoff is that it's much harder to ride regular in the powder. Take a look at home many powder boards are true twins!
Well, not as much as you would think. Explain then T Rice and other SuperNatural style riders who kill it on true twins.
11-23-2012 01:02 PM
Wiredsport
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJMurtagh View Post
Cool, nice to hear some positives!
I'm 5'4", 127Lbs and my foot size is women's 8. My board is a 147.
So that is going to be a very easy board to use and learn on. If you eventually prefer freeriding, carving etc, you will eventually outgrow it, but you can always use it as your play board.
11-23-2012 12:58 PM
NJMurtagh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiredsport View Post
Hi NJM,

You are going to have a lot of fun on that deck. Flat rock is very easy to learn on. This profile (generality) is stable and is very catch free and easy going. They don't love ice or extreme hardpack and the require care at speed, but on the whole you have a fun design to learn and progress on.

Plese post up your weight and foot size, as well as the length of your deck. It is still important that you have the correct size.
Cool, nice to hear some positives!
I'm 5'4", 127Lbs and my foot size is women's 8. My board is a 147.
11-22-2012 09:09 PM
Wiredsport Hi NJM,

You are going to have a lot of fun on that deck. Flat rock is very easy to learn on. This profile (generality) is stable and is very catch free and easy going. They don't love ice or extreme hardpack and the require care at speed, but on the whole you have a fun design to learn and progress on.

Plese post up your weight and foot size, as well as the length of your deck. It is still important that you have the correct size.
11-22-2012 09:02 PM
snowklinger
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreampow View Post
For most riders out there its just splitting hairs IMO. Probably doesn't make much odds until you get to upper intermediate.

Yes, a directional twinish deck with a slight setback is probably the 1 board quiver I would recommend.

Having said that twin decks can do everything very well, so just enjoy your new board OP.

I spent most of last season on a 161 Volkl zenit. It has setback (which I set all the way back for pow days) a touch of taper and is stiffer in the tail. Posi camber.

Then I bought a 157 proto CT specifically for all mountain freestyle and because I like riding switch (at least 30%) and want to ride more. I ride a lot of switch in pow and the twin profile makes it much easier. As long as its not too deep a C2BTX type profile gives plenty of float going either way.

I just like the idea of using my body and muscle groups in a balanced way left and right.

I was actually very pleasantly surprised with how well I could carve on the proto, takes a little more fore aft movement, but with effort it carves really well (not as well as the Volkl but pretty damn good).


I still have the volkl and no doubt I will be riding it a fair bit this season (when I want to bomb flat out).
I'll be on the proto most days though and I guarantee I'll be flying past people on their freeride sticks on the steeps and powder sticks in the pow because I know how to ride it.

If people like twins let them ride them, its slightly disadvantageous for carving and powder but its minimal and the limiting factor here is almost always rider ability not board.
qft.

lonerider, you can't argue with someone when they tell you that you come off as condescending, it just makes it more so. You do come off that way a little, and pretty sure Grafta and I like ya(ok not sure about Grafta, he is pretty badass).

Maybe I come off the same way, dunno, sounds like you ride pretty good, but no amount of ability really makes your opinions more factual. Facts are facts and opinions are opinions.
11-22-2012 07:05 PM
dreampow For most riders out there its just splitting hairs IMO. Probably doesn't make much odds until you get to upper intermediate.

Yes, a directional twinish deck with a slight setback is probably the 1 board quiver I would recommend.

Having said that twin decks can do everything very well, so just enjoy your new board OP.

I spent most of last season on a 161 Volkl zenit. It has setback (which I set all the way back for pow days) a touch of taper and is stiffer in the tail. Posi camber.

Then I bought a 157 proto CT specifically for all mountain freestyle and because I like riding switch (at least 30%) and want to ride more. I ride a lot of switch in pow and the twin profile makes it much easier. As long as its not too deep a C2BTX type profile gives plenty of float going either way.

I just like the idea of using my body and muscle groups in a balanced way left and right.

I was actually very pleasantly surprised with how well I could carve on the proto, takes a little more fore aft movement, but with effort it carves really well (not as well as the Volkl but pretty damn good).


I still have the volkl and no doubt I will be riding it a fair bit this season (when I want to bomb flat out).
I'll be on the proto most days though and I guarantee I'll be flying past people on their freeride sticks on the steeps and powder sticks in the pow because I know how to ride it.

If people like twins let them ride them, its slightly disadvantageous for carving and powder but its minimal and the limiting factor here is almost always rider ability not board.
11-22-2012 05:44 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex B View Post
Out of interest, what is the advantage of a directional twin?
It's essentially another compromise. It'll carve better than a true twin (though not as good as a true directional), and ride fakie better than a true directional (though not as good as a true twin).

Clear as mud?!?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey View Post
If I could only own one board.. it would be something slightly directional. Completely symetrical setups are not going to make you a better switch rider, a directional 1-board-quiver is going to serve you a lot better.

To the OP, don't be discouraged by your purchase and the advice... if you get into some nice snow, just set your bindings back an insert and you will do just fine! If you love snowboarding and ride a ton.. you will probably find yourself owning a shorter twin and a longer directional later in life.

For what it is worth.. I have owned some of the so-called "quiver-killer" boards and nothing beats actually owning a good 2+ board quiver IF you ride dynamic conditions.
+1 although a true park rat would probably only need a 1 board quiver and that would be a true twin. Methinks the average rider is best served by a mid-flex, directional, all mountain board.

Also, I find most people only ride their first board for a short period of time. Best to buy something in the middle of most specs and then once you determine where you want to take your riding, get something more specialized.

I'm a big proponent of a quiver-killer but that's because my RUNS let alone my DAYS can include copious amounts of powder, followed by some high speed groomer bombing, to a kicker, then into the glades, finally back out onto a groomer/cat track for some carving and side hits. The elevation changes here can mean that the top of the mountain has 1 foot of light powder, with the middle section in ice/hardpack, and the bottom is slush. That was last May at Lake Louise and it had me guessing a few times in one run!
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