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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-02-2013 07:44 PM
Triple8Sol I would definitely suggest the 158 for real all mountain riding.
01-02-2013 07:36 PM
lonerider
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassmanRuchy View Post
The biggest thing that is going against me getting the 158 is that I don't know if it'll be very maneuverable in the park. Honestly I don't ride park very much (probably one to three laps per day) but I still would like something that's playful enough to go in and take some hits off of the kickers. Likewise with the 155, I just haven't ridden it enough to know if it can handle very high speeds and some nice carves.
155 vs 158 is going to be subtle differences and largely personal preference.

What is playful enough for one person, is probably not what you might want. What someone finds fun in the park and easy to ride switch may or may not be what you are looking for.

You've already ridden the 152 cm and the 155 cm... you should be able to imagine what the 158 cm would be like... and whether you would like it, better than what strangers can suggest on the internet (we'll all be suggesting variations of what "we would like"). Personally, I don't think you will have trouble maneuvering the 158 in the park... but I'm not you. I'm 150 lbs and I use my Proto 154 as a pure park board. Snowklinger is like 175 lbs, rides a 154 and uses it for all-mountain freestyle (finding little hits and jibs on the edges of the trail). If you do a search, you should have no problem finding other Proto CT riders and see the other weight/length/riding preferences they have.

If you still are having doubt... maybe you should just demo the boards again as that is going to be the best way to make a decision.
01-02-2013 07:29 PM
lonerider
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassmanRuchy View Post
I have thought about getting the Legacy (the wide version of the SL), but the only thing holding me back is that it's a directional twin...the only reason that I would like a true twin is because I don't want to have to change my stance or form when switching from regular to goofy.

I would say that I'm definitely more of a carver than a park guy, but I still like to hit the park a couple times and bust out a grab or two. My instinct is telling me to go with the 158, but I just want to be sure that it can still handle being put through a couple of park laps each time it goes out.
The changes you would need to make to ride switch on a board like the Legacy or even the Cobra X are minimal - if you can ride switch, you can ride this board switch the entire run if you wanted to.

In my opinion, the benefits of a true twin for riding are way overrated. If you are riding switch 50% of the time and are in the park 100% of the time, it does help a little... but if you are riding switch like 5% of the time and outside of the park 80% of the time, I don't see why you should make this type of trade off.

It's like buying a high riding SUV "in case you want to go offroad", when in reality 99% of your driving is done at like 65 mph on paved road (where a lower, stiffer suspension would give you a much better corning performance).

Again, remember that I said since you have ridden and like the 155, you should get that. That being said I have no doubt that a 158 is perfectly fine for a few laps in the park. The Proto is still an incredibly park friendly board... and adding 2% to the overall length isn't suddenly going to make it a hassle to ride. It will bit a little bit heavier (but my rough estimate about 2 ounces heavier) and a little bit stiffer. You might not "prefer" the feeling... but 3 cm is a subtle difference.
01-02-2013 07:19 PM
BassmanRuchy
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
But generalizations are what I do best! I have to stick to what I know!!! lol

Ultimately I don't think it'll make a big difference either way between the 155 and 158. Some people may get wigged out by a larger number and "feel" like the board is vastly different than what it is.

I know the opposite happened for me recently. I bought a board with nearly identical specs to my old board in terms of overall length, waist width, and tip and tail width, amount of camber, etc. Therefore I expected it to "feel" like my old board under my feet. What I was ignoring was a much larger sidecut radius and effective edge, which made me feel like I had been riding a harley and now I was on a sportbike. Felt completely different.

In contrast, when I went from a 153 freestyle board, to a stiffer, longer 159 board it should have felt very different, but it didn't. Because the sidecut radius and effective edge were similar.

Next time Burton has a demo day at one of my local mountains I'm going to see if I can get the Custom or Custom X in two sizes, and go out and try them back to back. I honestly don't think there will be much of a difference between two close sizes.

Happy riding all!
True...I guess that I should just pull up the specs for my Youngblood and see how both the 155 and 158 match up against it.

The biggest thing that is going against me getting the 158 is that I don't know if it'll be very maneuverable in the park. Honestly I don't ride park very much (probably one to three laps per day) but I still would like something that's playful enough to go in and take some hits off of the kickers. Likewise with the 155, I just haven't ridden it enough to know if it can handle very high speeds and some nice carves.
01-02-2013 07:15 PM
BassmanRuchy
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonerider View Post
You know a lot better than to trust a generic snowboard length calculator .

While in general I agree that someone 185 lbs would probably be on a 160ish board, but that's a generalization (that also reflect my personal preference for longer boards). When it gets to specifics, I think he should trust his instincts (he's been riding enough to know his own preferences ... subconsciously at least).

In my opinion, length matters less than construction... if he really wants a board that is more freeride/carve oriented... he need a board that is stiffer and more damp than the Proto (I own a 2012 Proto 154 myself, so I'm not bagging on it... but I know what it designed for an what it can do). Something like an SL or Cobra if you are going to stick with a Never Summer board (I own a 2009 SL 155, haven't tried the Cobra yet).
I have thought about getting the Legacy (the wide version of the SL), but the only thing holding me back is that it's a directional twin...the only reason that I would like a true twin is because I don't want to have to change my stance or form when switching from regular to goofy.

I would say that I'm definitely more of a carver than a park guy, but I still like to hit the park a couple times and bust out a grab or two. My instinct is telling me to go with the 158, but I just want to be sure that it can still handle being put through a couple of park laps each time it goes out.
01-02-2013 06:35 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonerider View Post
You know a lot better than to trust a generic snowboard length calculator .
But generalizations are what I do best! I have to stick to what I know!!! lol

Ultimately I don't think it'll make a big difference either way between the 155 and 158. Some people may get wigged out by a larger number and "feel" like the board is vastly different than what it is.

I know the opposite happened for me recently. I bought a board with nearly identical specs to my old board in terms of overall length, waist width, and tip and tail width, amount of camber, etc. Therefore I expected it to "feel" like my old board under my feet. What I was ignoring was a much larger sidecut radius and effective edge, which made me feel like I had been riding a harley and now I was on a sportbike. Felt completely different.

In contrast, when I went from a 153 freestyle board, to a stiffer, longer 159 board it should have felt very different, but it didn't. Because the sidecut radius and effective edge were similar.

Next time Burton has a demo day at one of my local mountains I'm going to see if I can get the Custom or Custom X in two sizes, and go out and try them back to back. I honestly don't think there will be much of a difference between two close sizes.

Happy riding all!
01-02-2013 05:40 PM
lonerider
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
Fair enough, in that case I'd say if you really want to lay a good carve, longer is better, but if you're wanting to play around on it, go for the shorter one. Again, I'm 5'7" 175 lb and ride a 160 and it certainly doesn't feel too long to me, but I'm way more into freeriding.

The trusty snowboard calc puts you in the 160-162 range based on your weight, ability, etc. As mentioned in other threads the calculators are just a guide, but I've found them to be pretty damn accurate so far.

My vote goes for the 158 but that's just me...
You know a lot better than to trust a generic snowboard length calculator .

While in general I agree that someone 185 lbs would probably be on a 160ish board, but that's a generalization (that also reflect my personal preference for longer boards). When it gets to specifics, I think he should trust his instincts (he's been riding enough to know his own preferences ... subconsciously at least).

In my opinion, length matters less than construction... if he really wants a board that is more freeride/carve oriented... he need a board that is stiffer and more damp than the Proto (I own a 2012 Proto 154 myself, so I'm not bagging on it... but I know what it designed for an what it can do). Something like an SL or Cobra if you are going to stick with a Never Summer board (I own a 2009 SL 155, haven't tried the Cobra yet).
01-02-2013 05:35 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassmanRuchy View Post
I live in Pennsylvania, so I'm mostly riding man-made snow with the occasional bit of powder...groomers and ice is pretty much everything I have to deal with.
Fair enough, in that case I'd say if you really want to lay a good carve, longer is better, but if you're wanting to play around on it, go for the shorter one. Again, I'm 5'7" 175 lb and ride a 160 and it certainly doesn't feel too long to me, but I'm way more into freeriding.

The trusty snowboard calc puts you in the 160-162 range based on your weight, ability, etc. As mentioned in other threads the calculators are just a guide, but I've found them to be pretty damn accurate so far.

My vote goes for the 158 but that's just me...
01-02-2013 05:25 PM
BassmanRuchy I live in Pennsylvania, so I'm mostly riding man-made snow with the occasional bit of powder...groomers and ice is pretty much everything I have to deal with.
01-02-2013 04:06 PM
poutanen What part of the world are you riding in? Also "all-mountain" is a bit of a generic term. If all mountain for you is groomers, some ice, moguls, the occasional few inches of fresh snow, and some park, a shorter board would be okay. If all mountain can include some steep off-piste runs a shorter board may get overwhelmed for your weight. You're not a small guy.

FWIW I weigh 175 and just bought a 160 cm board with a 140+ cm effective edge. So I guess it "rides" like a 170+ cm board if you think about it only in terms of effective edge.

It certainly took some getting used to riding something with 8" more metal touching snow on either side, but I have now taken it through nearly everything I took my old 159 cm, 123 cm effective edge board through, and it's not some scarey beast to ride. It's so confident at carving that it's making the rest of my boarding even better, so embrace the length, embrace the effective edge, and don't sell yourself short! HA! I made a funny... lol
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