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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-29-2013 10:47 AM
neni
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
There are a couple of places on Seymour where you want to get up as much speed as possible to make it past the flats or up a hill on the other side. Baker has some of the same. It's not speed for its own sake, but I remember the first couple of times coming out of the Brockton area where it was a toss-up whether I was going to make it to the end of the bombing stretch in one piece. So even if you don't like bombing, sometimes you have to be able to.
+1
ALL the back and reds in my home resort have at least one such flat stretch or chairlift stations on elevations. It was designed for skiers with poles... Some friends avoid the resort becaus of this. You either learn to straight line or you walk. On every run. I still don't make it over all elevations...
04-29-2013 09:59 AM
Donutz There are a couple of places on Seymour where you want to get up as much speed as possible to make it past the flats or up a hill on the other side. Baker has some of the same. It's not speed for its own sake, but I remember the first couple of times coming out of the Brockton area where it was a toss-up whether I was going to make it to the end of the bombing stretch in one piece. So even if you don't like bombing, sometimes you have to be able to.
04-29-2013 08:07 AM
Ken2234 Speed isn't very important I feel. Whats the fun in bombing runs? Maybe if your just trying to rack up the vertical or racing a group of your friends then yea. Like everyone else said, the more experience and confidence you obtain, speed will just come naturally.

The Real test isn't bombing groomers but shredding the trees at high speed.

If you want to go really fast I'd suggest grabbing a pair of skis.
04-29-2013 07:36 AM
CassMT i would trust the reading of a slopeside cop with a radar gun,kinda... gps speeds seem inaccurate, mostly exaggerated

if you are scaring yourself a bit, then you are going fast enough
04-29-2013 06:05 AM
neni
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
Then I officially hold the record for all time fastest snowboarder ever! My GPS phone recorded a max speed of 610 km/h on this particular day...
It's a Bird... It's a Plane... Creepy one with x-ray vision...
04-28-2013 10:20 PM
bamfb2 In addition, all the apps run different algorithms, none of which are calibrated to each other so comparison is worthless?
04-28-2013 09:33 PM
Deacon "elevation correction disabled"
04-28-2013 09:23 PM
snowklinger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
An ILS glide slope is 3-3.5 degrees. It really isn't a speed issue, its a position issue. In an aircraft, it is indicated airspeed that is most important for flight dynamics. Ground speed is important for fuel requirement calculations. In the past, GPS was notoriously inaccurate at providing vertical position. To the point that GPS could not be used for precision approaches. On a GPS approach, the GPS altimeter could be 100-200 feet off from the aircraft's aneroid altimeter. Since a precision approach such as a cat 3 ILS, approach has minimums of under 200 feet, GPS was unsafe. Today, these errors are generally less than 25 feet so approach minimums have been lowered. While I get your point about slope angle, this improved vertical position accuracy also applies to riding applications and as a result, speed calculations are much more accurate than they were 10 years ago. In any case, your cell phone GPS is likely to be within 2-3 MPH of accurate.
+

Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
Then I officially hold the record for all time fastest snowboarder ever! My GPS phone recorded a max speed of 610 km/h on this particular day...

Day 3 - Nakiska E71 (Annalee 1st day) by apoutanen at Garmin Connect - Details
=
LOL!

You need to slow the fuck down too!
04-28-2013 06:02 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
In any case, your cell phone GPS is likely to be within 2-3 MPH of accurate.
Then I officially hold the record for all time fastest snowboarder ever! My GPS phone recorded a max speed of 610 km/h on this particular day...

Day 3 - Nakiska E71 (Annalee 1st day) by apoutanen at Garmin Connect - Details
04-28-2013 05:31 PM
snowklinger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
This used to be the case but it really is not so much any more. As an instrument rated pilot, I use GPS for instrument approaches. Few years back, a GPS approach was considered a non precision approach because the system did not calculate vertical height and motion well. The average GPS approach had minimums that were on par with an NDB approach ( the least accurate ).

This is no longer the case as both the processing power of GPS units and the improvement in the satellite coverage has increased. A GPS unit, even a handheld or cell phone, has much greater accuracy and the panel mounted units are near perfect. Now with ground based WAAS (wide area augmentation system) these units now allow a precision glide slope approach.

As a result of aviation driven accuracy, all GPS units including cell phones have seen a huge improvement in accuracy and this includes major corrections to this vertical speed error. Today, your small handheld units are highly accurate and the deviations small.

There still exists some potential for error however and that is dependent upon direction of travel and your location on the plant. The GPS satellite constelation is in geosynchronous orbit around the equator. The farther north you are in the northern hemisphere, the lower the azimuth is of the signal and this makes it a little tougher for the unit to calculate vertical height than near the equator. Terrain will also cause more signal degradation. If you are at a high northern latitude in say the PNW on a north facing slope, you loose some coverage from some of the satellites due to geographical interference. It's the same reason your XM radio will cut out in the mountains or in heavy timber. This lapse of coverage intermittently will create errors in the unit and throw your speeds off. Ride a south facing slope in the northern hemisphere and you're golden.

Isn't your pilot stuff a bad example though? I didn't get into the math because I'm averse to it...but with the exception of like fighter pilots.....doesn't most piloting involve pretty low angles? I mean what is the angle of landing approach?

Just axin.
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