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Thread: VIDEO - critics welcome. Pain in quad when riding. Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-29-2014 02:30 PM
jml22 high1 - YouTube
Watch and learn lol
01-29-2014 02:17 PM
Mel M
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksup3erb View Post
Right -- the goal isn't just to do more carves, as much fun as they are. It's also to get you to realize that turn initiation actually starts from the end of the previous physical turn (the aft weighting), and not the new physical turn (the fore weighting).
That's a REALLY good point. Once I started to hone in on the AFT weighting, my oversteering problems got much, much better. The unweighting into my next turn became fluid and snappier. Like I was doing a mini ollie between turns.

Everyone's given some excellent advice so I won't be redundant, but a tip I want to share as far dipping the shoulders that's helped me be more dynamic with my upper body is to extend the leading hand out and pretend you're holding a steering wheel. I'm regular footed, so when I initiate a toeside, I would turn the imaginary steering wheel with my left hand clockwise from 12 to 3 o'clock. When I'm going heelside, I turn it counterclockwise from 12 to 9 o'clock.

I don't actually do this anymore, but when I was practicing to get more dynamic on the really steep slopes, this helped me out tremendously.
01-28-2014 04:59 PM
ksup3erb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klang180 View Post
Ah ha working this forum out a little more so can include your quote in my reply. Once again thanks for putting the time in to responding. I have actually been out this morning and already been trying your fore/aft suggestions. I realised i was already doing some of this when i go for a proper carve when the snow is not as icy but hadn't really transfered it into my skidded turns. I can already feel how it makes it much more powerful and more on the rail and actually makes it into a mini carve, well sometimes anyway

I've actually been doing some freestyle for a little while but i am not brilliant. However after watching some instructional vids i realised i never really popped off the lip. Now that i am starting to do that and my timing is improving i find myself doing better. It also helps on the piste when popping off rollers etc.

It is a matter of putting the time in and getting more out of my riding so i will respond with a few videos in a few days

Thanks to everyone!
Right -- the goal isn't just to do more carves, as much fun as they are. It's also to get you to realize that turn initiation actually starts from the end of the previous physical turn (the aft weighting), and not the new physical turn (the fore weighting). Combine this aft move with unweighting the nose (cross-under move) and you'll feel a pop (really not the best word) that allows you to quickly determine the path of your next turn. Combine this with upper body movements -- I like to drive my front shoulder in the direction I want the board to follow -- and you're going to already be a lot more powerful in and out of turns.

It's easier if someone showed you. Unfortunately I have no videos.
01-28-2014 04:10 PM
Klang180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksup3erb View Post
So fore-aft is indeed along the length of the board. It's a weight transfer from your fore foot through center to your aft foot as you move through the turn. You're probably already doing the fore weighting when you get your weight to the fore foot and flatten the nose to initiate a turn. About halfway through the turn you'll shift to about equal weighting. And then to complete the turn you'll shift to weight on your rear foot, sort of like a mild Ollie/tail press move.

I can tell that you can benefit from this because in the video you're doing a lot of skidding through turns. As you complete your turns your tail is washing out and there's a lot of snow flying up. With fore-aft you keep better pressure on your edge where it's needed throughout the turn, and you tend to have cleaner turns and better control throughout. Aft weighting at the end of the turn gives you that pop off the tail and control to enter your next turn with a lot more power.

Fore-aft is key to actually finishing turns as well. Try practicing this by exaggerating your turns by finishing them going back uphill. You'll find you can't do this if you've already skidded out your tail.

Fore-aft is especially important on steeper runs where the skidding you're doing now will exaggerate and you lose your edge completely.

Riding switch and starting to do some simple freestyle components (small kickers, spines, boxes, 180s, even bumps) once you've got the basics down helps because it forces you to slow down and think through the mechanics. You can ride better than most of people on the mountain already. But by now a lot of your turns are muscle memory and you're not really thinking about what you're doing or why. Starting now to do new things are going to be weird for your muscles but you KNOW how to do them. So if you're riding switch you'll focus on relearning things but not really. If you're doing simple freestyle you really need to be conscious of your weighting/body position and edging. This board awareness transfers to all aspects of your riding, including your regular stance stuff. I haven't articulated this that well but you get the point.

Finally, it's not your equipment. Maybe play around with width and angles, but if you're riding at this level getting to the next step is practice and more experience.
Ah ha working this forum out a little more so can include your quote in my reply. Once again thanks for putting the time in to responding. I have actually been out this morning and already been trying your fore/aft suggestions. I realised i was already doing some of this when i go for a proper carve when the snow is not as icy but hadn't really transfered it into my skidded turns. I can already feel how it makes it much more powerful and more on the rail and actually makes it into a mini carve, well sometimes anyway

I've actually been doing some freestyle for a little while but i am not brilliant. However after watching some instructional vids i realised i never really popped off the lip. Now that i am starting to do that and my timing is improving i find myself doing better. It also helps on the piste when popping off rollers etc.

It is a matter of putting the time in and getting more out of my riding so i will respond with a few videos in a few days

Thanks to everyone!
01-28-2014 04:04 PM
Klang180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed View Post
Your riding looks good. I'll have to mirror what some others are saying in that it's time to get more dynamic, especially with your upper body.

Right now your upper body is kind of just along for the ride, but what I'd suggest is start really concentrating on rotating and pushing your shoulder in the direction you want to turn.

So if you turn toeside, don't just let your upper body sit there, really rotate it and pretend you're trying to shove your leading shoulder where you want it to go as you engage your lower body. You can do the same with your lower body too by really pushing your knees and ankles into the direction of your turn to make your board respond quicker.

Once you start doing this you'll notice your board turns quicker and you have more control over when and how quickly you turn/pressure your edge.

Besides this, one small thing I'd correct is I noticed on your heelside turns your upper body gets left behind slightly more than on your toeside turns. You're not rotating your head and upper body to look in the heelside direction for whatever reason.

Try this: Take your leading hand and point in the direction you want to do when you turn heelside. It'll force you to make sure your upper body is rotating along with your lower body.

Overall riding looks good, just about getting more dynamic by really using your upper body + knees and ankles to power those turns faster.
Thanks Jed really appreciate your input and your observation, i think i will try your suggestions today and take a few more vids once i have had time to put it into affect properly.
01-28-2014 12:20 PM
speedjason time to train these legs.
01-28-2014 10:59 AM
tanscrazydaisy To address some of the quad pain....

a soft board (which you have) will less demanding on the legs compared to a stiff flex board (probably, your old Camber board).

So, of course, you're legs aren't in endurance shape. This is where the off-season, you need to be doing activities that build up the endurance in your legs.

Many people bike (with lots of hill climbing, whether on the road or on the trails)

others hit the gym.... but you have to also focus on building the endurance of the legs, which also includes doing some high reps/lower weight as well.

Like working out.... where you may drink a shake afterwards... treat riding the same way....the crappy deep fried lodge food doesn't really help you... but sometimes you gotta have that chicken fingers/fries basket and of course some good beer afterwards and during.

Get the proper nutrition and hydration during and afterwards also. Bring some good snacks that you can eat when you're riding the lifts (to keep you full & fueled).... then you won't be hungry and you can keep riding while everyone else is in the lodge eating lunch....

Right now during the season, you can hit the gym to focus on leg endurance also.
01-28-2014 10:15 AM
ksup3erb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klang180 View Post
Thanks a lot for the additional feedback Ksup and definetly duly noted.

One question for you and the others kind enough to give me feedback, when you say fore and aft movements i understand you mean forward and back along the length of the board but i am not sure i really understand how one achieves this?

Also, i actually have begun switch and freestyle elements but i suck at the former and am pretty bad at the latter. Still i guess it is only a matter of time for those elements.

Anyone think i could do with any setup adjustments or is that all a matter of preference? I always itch to go wider but am worried that, as in the past, i am blaming my setup/equipment for a lack of ability or commitment and i am not willing to go there again
So fore-aft is indeed along the length of the board. It's a weight transfer from your fore foot through center to your aft foot as you move through the turn. You're probably already doing the fore weighting when you get your weight to the fore foot and flatten the nose to initiate a turn. About halfway through the turn you'll shift to about equal weighting. And then to complete the turn you'll shift to weight on your rear foot, sort of like a mild Ollie/tail press move.

I can tell that you can benefit from this because in the video you're doing a lot of skidding through turns. As you complete your turns your tail is washing out and there's a lot of snow flying up. With fore-aft you keep better pressure on your edge where it's needed throughout the turn, and you tend to have cleaner turns and better control throughout. Aft weighting at the end of the turn gives you that pop off the tail and control to enter your next turn with a lot more power.

Fore-aft is key to actually finishing turns as well. Try practicing this by exaggerating your turns by finishing them going back uphill. You'll find you can't do this if you've already skidded out your tail.

Fore-aft is especially important on steeper runs where the skidding you're doing now will exaggerate and you lose your edge completely.

Riding switch and starting to do some simple freestyle components (small kickers, spines, boxes, 180s, even bumps) once you've got the basics down helps because it forces you to slow down and think through the mechanics. You can ride better than most of people on the mountain already. But by now a lot of your turns are muscle memory and you're not really thinking about what you're doing or why. Starting now to do new things are going to be weird for your muscles but you KNOW how to do them. So if you're riding switch you'll focus on relearning things but not really. If you're doing simple freestyle you really need to be conscious of your weighting/body position and edging. This board awareness transfers to all aspects of your riding, including your regular stance stuff. I haven't articulated this that well but you get the point.

Finally, it's not your equipment. Maybe play around with width and angles, but if you're riding at this level getting to the next step is practice and more experience.
01-28-2014 03:26 AM
Jed Your riding looks good. I'll have to mirror what some others are saying in that it's time to get more dynamic, especially with your upper body.

Right now your upper body is kind of just along for the ride, but what I'd suggest is start really concentrating on rotating and pushing your shoulder in the direction you want to turn.

So if you turn toeside, don't just let your upper body sit there, really rotate it and pretend you're trying to shove your leading shoulder where you want it to go as you engage your lower body. You can do the same with your lower body too by really pushing your knees and ankles into the direction of your turn to make your board respond quicker.

Once you start doing this you'll notice your board turns quicker and you have more control over when and how quickly you turn/pressure your edge.

Besides this, one small thing I'd correct is I noticed on your heelside turns your upper body gets left behind slightly more than on your toeside turns. You're not rotating your head and upper body to look in the heelside direction for whatever reason.

Try this: Take your leading hand and point in the direction you want to do when you turn heelside. It'll force you to make sure your upper body is rotating along with your lower body.

Overall riding looks good, just about getting more dynamic by really using your upper body + knees and ankles to power those turns faster.
01-28-2014 02:29 AM
Klang180 Thanks Noreaster, for the advice and for putting my mind at ease about the ruddering.

Yes i suppose it must mean something that my knees need to be forced out to be comfortable. I will try a wider stance as well as the other board i have access to. It seems a little stiffer and has some camber so maybe it will be better suited.
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