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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-10-2014 04:44 PM
trapper
Quote:
Originally Posted by KIRKRIDER View Post
Also try and point your feet fingers up when on a heel side.
Thanks I'll try to keep that in mind as well.
02-10-2014 04:20 PM
ksup3erb
Quote:
Originally Posted by trapper View Post
So to update, several of your guys' tips seemed to help. I was out yesterday and definitely kept the heelside chattering to a minimum (only noticed it on a few occasions early in the day) and had no slide outs on steeps.

The things that helped the most were keeping my eyes focused more in the direction of travel and not the fall line, weighting slightly more on the back foot at the start of the heelside turn and leaning forward to initiate the toeside turn a moment sooner (unless I was committing to riding on the heel edge longer). I also tried to be more conscious of stacking my center up over the heel edge better.

It wasn't perfect, but definitely a marked improvement. Thanks again for all the help.
Cool. Good news.
02-10-2014 03:36 PM
KIRKRIDER
Quote:
Originally Posted by trapper View Post
So to update, several of your guys' tips seemed to help. I was out yesterday and definitely kept the heelside chattering to a minimum (only noticed it on a few occasions early in the day) and had no slide outs on steeps.

The things that helped the most were keeping my eyes focused more in the direction of travel and not the fall line, weighting slightly more on the back foot at the start of the heelside turn and leaning forward to initiate the toeside turn a moment sooner (unless I was committing to riding on the heel edge longer). I also tried to be more conscious of stacking my center up over the heel edge better.

It wasn't perfect, but definitely a marked improvement. Thanks again for all the help.
Also try and point your feet fingers up when on a heel side.
02-10-2014 03:33 PM
trapper So to update, several of your guys' tips seemed to help. I was out yesterday and definitely kept the heelside chattering to a minimum (only noticed it on a few occasions early in the day) and had no slide outs on steeps.

The things that helped the most were keeping my eyes focused more in the direction of travel and not the fall line, weighting slightly more on the back foot at the start of the heelside turn and leaning forward to initiate the toeside turn a moment sooner (unless I was committing to riding on the heel edge longer). I also tried to be more conscious of stacking my center up over the heel edge better.

It wasn't perfect, but definitely a marked improvement. Thanks again for all the help.
02-04-2014 05:32 PM
trapper Right on thanks for all the feedback guys! When I'm back on a proper keyboard I want to respond to some individual points but I think taken together this all should help me figure it out. There does seem to be a fine line on when to shift forward to go back into the toe turn and how to lean with proper posture to get this right. Seems to be some common themes in all the responses. Makes sense now why I can do this well on blues but not blacks, just have to get the timing and technique exactly right since the margin for error is smaller.

Thanks again everyone.
02-04-2014 05:16 PM
t21 Last season, my neighbor who is a instructor showed me the way to deal with my heelside turns on a double black chute runs especially when its been moguled up by skiers. His technique was as you make your heelside turn you lean a bit forward and stay centered as you are traversing with knees bend BUT stay relax and point your board uphill. The moment you feel your going up, you initiate your toeside turn. This really works for me especially the relax part because i tend to rush my turns. The part where he showed me the uphill travel does slows you down enough to engage your toeside to make your turn.
02-04-2014 01:37 PM
MelC I have this exact problem too. I am generally fine up to double black on the ice coast and then I end up making commas with my heelside washout. Toeside is fine. I can usually hold on and not land on my butt but it is not what anyone would call pretty. I am relatively certain it is due to not stacking properly over the board since it usually grabs on again when I think to "Frankenstein" as someone put it above (we learned it as push/pull). I am sure some of it is psychological too as when you do your toeside you are close to and focussed more on the hill next to you and on your heel side you just have the sheer drop of it staring up at you...I suspect this is why my form isn't particularly good - too much distraction. I am going to try the suggestion of looking along the traverse line instead of the drop and emphasize the Frankenstein pose a bit more and see how that helps. The good news is that it doesn't get much worse than a double black covered in hardpack with icy patches so I should be in good stead if I can just master it at my local hill.
02-04-2014 12:03 PM
thedru13 Still trying to figure some of this out myself. I am pushing my stance out a bit wider to get my knees to bend more. I found that while riding more aggressive I was not bending my knees enough or not sitting was leaning over. I needed to use my knees as shock absorbers more. It killed some of the chatter and the board felt a lot more solid. So my legs/knees absorbed a lot of that chatter. You have received a lot better responses but I am no expert in this area just another thought as to what helped me out.
02-04-2014 11:38 AM
KIRKRIDER
Quote:
Originally Posted by trapper View Post
So I'm at the point where I'd say I'm a solid intermediate rider (freeride not freestyle). I took a few laps with an instructor back in early December and it really helped a lot with understanding the use of the front foot in turn initiation. Previously I had been using my back foot a bit too much for turns. I'm at a point where I can cruise pretty fast on groomers of moderate steepness and am even laying down some actual carves (not the super deep ones with hand drags or anything) when I try.

So what's weird is that on a blue and I try to actually carve and pick up speed, heelside feels natural and smooth. Toeside turns had been an issue early this year but after implementing the instructor's advice these have actually become smooth too. In reality, I am now finding toeside turns and carves to come more naturally on steeper terrain than heelside.

Which brings me to the problem. When I ride a black diamond, I am pretty comfortable making my turns except when I hit an icy patch or the steepest spot (oftentimes both things at the same time) going into a heelside turn. What happens is I'm not absorbing the speed and my boards chatters violently and will sometimes put me directly on my ass.

I've tried bending my knees more but that doesn't seem to help. I'm wondering if it has something to do with proper fore and aft movements going into, riding through and coming out of the heelside turn. Obviously I'm going to seek the advice of an instructor if I can't solve this on my own, but I was just wondering what advice any of you more experienced guys/gals can provide.

Thanks for any feedback.

TLDR: Heelside board chatter on steeps, how to shift bodyweight properly to avoid it. Toeside is not a problem, nice and smooth.

High binding angles, (18 deg. and up) and both positive, will give you more or less the same kind of motion / rotation toe side and heel side. Once you perfect your tech you can go back to more open angles. But I find that the right binding angles are the most helpful factor when carving. Makes sense?
02-04-2014 11:16 AM
Bparmz
Quote:
Originally Posted by aiidoneus View Post
The common problem I see with people's heelside turns when carving is bending at the waist. This causes the center of mass to shift towards the middle of the board instead of the heelside edge where you want it. As you come across the hill this causes the board to slip and break free. Which is kind of what I think is happening to you.

Unlike a toeside carve where you can really roll your hips and knees forward and keep the weight centred over the edge. Heelside you have to lean back into the hill as you compress at the start of your turn to really get a solid edge early.

The common drill to work on this is called Super Man(Toeside) / Frankenstein (Heelside). As you are on your toeside, you roll the hips forward and let your arms go behind you like you are flying as superman. Then as you switch to heelside you put your hands out in front of you like Frankenstein and lean back into the hill.
This^

To reduce the chatter, also try thinking about bringing your center of mass closer to your heel edge by getting lower, but do not bend at the waist. Keep your back straight
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