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Thread: Help with board selection - yep, another one! Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-05-2014 08:51 PM
Crash Guys thanks for all of the input....its truly appreciated. Sounds like the smart choice would be to check things out, possibly grab a set of boots that fit well and rent the board for a few lessons and go from there.

We'll see how it goes and then hit you up again for more advice.

Thanks again ........
03-05-2014 12:58 PM
the grouch If you are in the northern hemisphere, season is coming to an end and good deals can be found. But you won't have a lot of time to use your board this year.
I will echo what others said, get boots that fit. No need to go and buy the nicest boots out there, but something that fits and is comfortable is a must.

As for a board and bindings, for me (beginner this year) it boiled down to finding something with a deep discount that I know I can sell back without a big loss if I don't like it. That loss would be less than what I would have paid in rentals. Bonus, I like the board I bought.

Other than that, wear a helmet and don't try to go on advanced terrain too soon. And don't be discouraged when you crash a lot the first couple of days.
03-05-2014 12:36 PM
ItchEtrigR
Quote:
Originally Posted by ekb18c View Post
Hey! I'm that dude!

In all fairness, OP don't do what I did. I shared my experience with you so that you don't make the same mistake that I did.
dont get me wrong, new gear is dope, but my point is the money is better spent once you learn how to ride, learn what you like, then you can experiment!

you want a bit more softness to style out those presses, or your looking for something a bit stiffer since you like charging the mountain, maybe a powder board with some setback and length for that deep since you keep digging yourself out with that 150 twin, you'll know exactly what to look for.

you dont buy a board to do your riding, you buy a board so you can ride it how you want...

otherwise some other bloke is gonna ride it when you put your shit on craigslist for 1/5 of the price
03-05-2014 12:07 PM
ekb18c Hey! I'm that dude!

In all fairness, OP don't do what I did. I shared my experience with you so that you don't make the same mistake that I did.
03-05-2014 12:00 PM
ItchEtrigR
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomps1211 View Post
After I'd ridden with a particular set-up that was working OK for me for a while. Only then was I able to better determine what any changes in the above mentioned adjustments worked or didn't work for me.
another great piece of advice hidden in a post... this right here

the best piece of kit your ever gonna own is the one you know in and out, the one you've been riding for a while, the one your out enjoying every day you get a chance. tuned exactly how you like it.

dont be the dude buying 4 different type of boards in his first season looking to find that magic stick that'll make carving a bit easier, or make landing flush off that roller you like to hit, that board dont exist, well it does its called practice...
03-05-2014 11:21 AM
chomps1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItchEtrigR View Post
Forget all the tech bullshit, listen to this dude right here.

....camber? meh! you'll learn on anything, it'll make more sense to you once you learn.
This is very true. After spending a ton of money on my brand new, shiny Arbor. Until I became competent with the basics and even progressed a little beyond them,.. I didn't have enough experience to know what if any effect, good or bad, many of the changes and tweaks I made to my setup had. Things like, minute changes in bindings angles, high back fwd lean, stance width, etc.

I was only able to notice an appreciable difference any of those "tweaks" had if the change made things WAY worse. After I'd ridden with a particular set-up that was working OK for me for a while. Only then was I able to better determine what any changes in the above mentioned adjustments worked or didn't work for me. (...3.5 seasons in and I'm still tweaking and adjusting to fine tune my ride!) The same goes for boards and board profiles! In the beginning? They're ALL gonna feel Wonky!!

Don't sweat over that choice too much until you start comfortably linking some turns!


-edit-
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash View Post
....if i buy boots, whats the chance that they wont work with rental equipment bindings?
Unless you or your son have got MASSIVE hooves? Probably little to no chance. You might find that a particular binding set up will be too big or small for a particular boot, but you can always go back in and have them switched out for something that's a better fit. Most Rental shops will have a variety of sizes.
03-05-2014 11:18 AM
Crash Thanks Itch,

Looks like you paid close attention to my forum username..lol. I appreciate all of the input and thinking maybe I'll invest in a couple sets of good boots for my son and I and tear up rental equipment and buy when I have a better idea of what board would suit me better.....if i buy boots, whats the chance that they wont work with rental equipment bindings?
03-05-2014 10:56 AM
ItchEtrigR
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
If you have never ridden before, then none of the nuances make a lick of difference as your learning will have no comparison. Equipment makes very very little difference your first 20-50 days, while lessons, practice and technique will make every difference in progression and fun. Also nice gogs, comfortable feet and cozy clothing help.

How many days a year will u ride? Where?

Do you know how to skateboard or surf? Comfort standing sideways helps.

Forget all the camber talk.

Just buy something with a medium flex, stiff boards are a little harder to learn on, and if you buy a noodle it will be easier to learn but you will be pissed that you have a noodle once you do. You want 158-162 cm, a nice 2 inch range, you can go a little bigger or smaller, again not very important when learning.

Bindings: Burton Cartel, k2 company, salomon chief (these 3 bindings have been top all-mountains for their respective companies for years)

Or ignore everything I say and be like the guy who asked all these questions and then bought a Never Summer Raptor (AK board basically) for Michigan.
Forget all the tech bullshit, listen to this dude right here.

What I'll add is don't overspend on your first board, unless your gonna tippy toe through the learning process, within time your boards bound to get rocked up, treed up, railed up, boxed up, skated up, ski edged up, crashed up.

By the time your ability level has caught up with that fancy new stick you bought when you first started its going to be beat up and you'll probably go out and buy yourself a new ride.

Sizing is important, as is width, so is the flex, camber? meh! you'll learn on anything, it'll make more sense to you once you learn.
03-05-2014 10:05 AM
Crash EKB,

Thanks dude, thats some good input there....I believe my son will ride goofy so have a board we can both ride is cool...I'll check out the proto s.omemore
03-05-2014 09:48 AM
ekb18c I was in a similar situation as you last year when I first started. I was renting and then decided to buy my own boots, boards, bindings, etc. So I'll share my experience so that you can judge yourself on what you should.

My first year last year, I spent about 20 days on the snow. This year I've already surpassed that and went about 25 days already.

Boards:
1) I started off with Burton LTR (Learn to Ride) rental boards. At this point, I was just trying to stand up and learn how to balance myself on it.

2) Read about reverse camber and how it's easier to learn. So I went out and board a Sierra reverse Crew board.

a)Pro's - Not catching any edges, easy to learn, gave me more confidence as i progressed.
b) Con's - As I started progressing, I realized that it was really loose board and not very stable.

3)Hybrid Camber - (Flat in the middle) Wanted to try a loose board with flat section in the middle and reverse at the tip and tail. Went out and purchase the Capital Horrorscope after the season. Rode it one day and didn't like it and sold it shortly after.
Pro's - End of season sale so was under 200 bucks.
Con's - Very soft flexing board. Kids wanted to steal this board for some odd reason.

4) Hybrid Camber - Saw Burton's flying V so wanted to try that so went out and bought the Burton Custom flying v. Rode it on hard pack and didn't like it so in my garage and will use it again on better condition days. When conditions are good this board will do ok.



5) Hybrid Camber (C2-Btx) Lib Tech T-Rice - This board is awesome but will kick your arse if you lazy on it. Glad I didn't start on this board. Magnatraction helps out on hard pack.

6) Hybrid Camber - Started reading reviews on Never Summer boards. Borrowed a friends SL and rode it and thought it was amazing. Bought last seasons model.

When buysnow.com had an error in their site by granting 50% off on all boards, I went ahead and bought myself the NS Proto HD ($275 shipped). Love this board too. I find that learning to ride switch on a twin board is a little easier than on directional board. You can still do it on the SL but maybe in my mind i think it's easier on the proto as it's a true twin. The SL is twin also but is set back a little bit. Vario grip helps on hard pack.


In the end my go to board is the Proto HD.. I'll bring the Trice when I want to be a bit more aggressive.
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