Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: Never Summer sizing and board assistance please Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 
   

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-07-2014 12:04 PM
OU812 To add some numbers to the debate, I'm 6'4, 190lbs, 10.5 shoe size, 25in stance and ride a 161 SL and it feels great. Still have a lot to learn and feel the board really saved my ass a few times from not paying attention. Would love to try a Ripsaw 162 once I get better.
03-07-2014 08:28 AM
Loftness
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearPaw View Post
Thanks for the saw ice tip, I have taken note.
But understand I don't enjoy straight ice on *any* board. Straight ice means I find something else to do for the day.




....and yeah, I completely get the switch to something like a Proto in that slow soft stuff
03-07-2014 08:26 AM
BearPaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loftness View Post
Funny regarding the mash potato stuff, I had a really fun day on that type of snow with the Saw by treating it like it was powder and 'swishing' it around rather than carving through it. It was slow, but the board surprised me by how playful it let me be, considering how stiff it is. The only stuff I haven't enjoyed on it yet is straight ice.
I am currently of the mindset that when the snow is thick and slow I am switching to my proto. Thanks for the saw ice tip, I have taken note.
03-05-2014 04:43 PM
Loftness Yeah that's how I would also define sloppy. Just wanted to make sure we were talking about the same thing. It goes hand in hand with being lazy for me, and the Saw has bitten me twice now for being lazy. Both times I didn't know what I did wrong (just that I was suddenly on my ass hard) but knew that the reason I didn't know is because I hadn't been paying attention. I could usually get away with that on my SL, but not with the Saw.

Funny regarding the mash potato stuff, I had a really fun day on that type of snow with the Saw by treating it like it was powder and 'swishing' it around rather than carving through it. It was slow, but the board surprised me by how playful it let me be, considering how stiff it is. The only stuff I haven't enjoyed on it yet is straight ice.

I would agree that there will be people having trouble with this board who bought it b/c they heard it loves to go fast, and they love to go fast, but their technique isn't good.
03-04-2014 05:03 PM
BearPaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loftness View Post
That's so great to hear. Were you set up true twin or set back a bit?

Btw, when you say "sloppy" do you mean just kind of letting your guard down/straightening up?

Also what are your hgt/wgt/boot?
5' 9" tall, 185lbs, Burton Driver X, GNU Argo bindings with backs adjusted snug to leg, (but not pushing forward).

Board is setup full twin, 23 inch stance and +15/-15. Beware: Do not set back any Never Summer true twin blade.

My proto and legacy are detuned but my saw is intentionally not detuned. IMO it defeats the intention of the saw.

Sloppy means simple edge related mistakes while riding that on other boards (like a proto) you can recover from but on the saw its much more difficult to recover from an edge mistake, maybe impossible. As an example lets say your goofy foot turning toe side and you transition too fast for the speed you are going, the terrain you are riding so your balance is somewhat behind the turn heel side when it should be more toe side at the beginning of the actual turn. If you detect this error on a proto an experienced rider can correct for the error and regain control. On the saw the same error will result in an edge catch since the board is very sensitive to technical errors, you don't have time to make the correction with the saw. Today I went up and I was tired from yesterday. Normally when I am tired on the Proto for example no big deal. Not so on the saw because when you are tired you are prone to make subtle edge related mistakes. Plus the fact was riding in mashed potato snow and the saw doesn't like that stuff since your sliding more (I hate this kind of snow, it's slow). In contrast the proto likes mashed potato snow.

On the proto I would not notice I was tired under these conditions but on the saw I was acutely aware from the feel of the board that I was on the verge of making an unrecoverable subtle edge mistake. So I bailed early to rest for the day. The saw does not like squishy mashed potato snow so I may ride my proto in that slow stuff from now on.

Understand that the saw is exactly like a Formula One Ferrari. You simply can't make subtle mistakes on this deck at high speed. I guarantee when this blade hits the dealer shelves next fall that there will be a lot of riders whose technique is not perfect but who ride fast that will buy this board. I predict lots of injuries due to technical errors. On this forum, as an example, I was reading an old thread here where some people were talking about riding with their weight on the rear foot like a surf board as the correct way to ride. This is completely wrong except when leaning back if you want to really accelerate. If those people get a saw and ride like that they are going to wreck.

My background: I started riding three months ago yet unlike most riders my work affords me the opportunity to ride every day of the week and I have the top pro snowboard instructor at Big Mountain I train with twice a week.
03-04-2014 07:00 AM
Loftness
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearPaw View Post
Rode in pow and trees today on my 157cm saw x. Spectacular, better than my directional NS Legacy. Plenty of flex in the right places. Just can't be sloppy on it, unforgiven. Goes switch by just thinking it.

If your sloppy on this deck at high speed you die, simple as that. Best ride you will ever have, a true Zen blade.

Going back up tomorrow.
That's so great to hear. Were you set up true twin or set back a bit?

Btw, when you say "sloppy" do you mean just kind of letting your guard down/straightening up?

Also what are your hgt/wgt/boot?
03-03-2014 11:25 PM
BearPaw
Saw Excellent in Pow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Loftness View Post
PLEASE do. I'm very interested to know. Though a 157X is probably not the best comparison to my 156 reg, but I still want to hear.
Rode in pow and trees today on my 157cm saw x. Spectacular, better than my directional NS Legacy. Plenty of flex in the right places. Just can't be sloppy on it, unforgiven. Goes switch by just thinking it.

If your sloppy on this deck at high speed you die, simple as that. Best ride you will ever have, a true Zen blade.

Going back up tomorrow.
03-03-2014 11:12 AM
Silver King
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loftness View Post
If you do a lot of mogul type riding you'd probably want something with more flex...I would anyway.
I hit moguls whether I want to or not and that area is one of my weakest. I'm trying to progress to double blacks and my current board length is limiting me. I borrowed my buddy's Arbor somethingorother that was a 156 and it made a world of difference. Unfortunately, his board sucked everywhere else.

So, this is a typical run for me. Lift all the way up, hike up to a peak and drop in. The top will be steep but bombed with moguls (I rarely get fresh), aim for some trees, play around in there, pop out into some wide blue run where I like to go fast. Repeat.

Flex wise, the Proto and Cobra seem like a better fit.
03-03-2014 10:57 AM
Loftness
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver King View Post
So, do you think the sidecut of the Ripsaw has anything to do with you not wanting to slash on it? On NS' website, they show a 790 vario for the saw and a 735 for the Proto. Big difference. I'm sure a lot of the other design aspects come in play but if I'm after something to tackle steep trees and moguls, I'd think something with a deeper sidecut is what I want.
Well also the flex difference is pretty big, with the Ripsaw being much stiffer. If you do a lot of mogul type riding you'd probably want something with more flex...I would anyway.
03-03-2014 10:54 AM
Loftness
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearPaw View Post
Today may be a deep powder day on big mountain. If it is then I will report on how the saw does in deep powder.
PLEASE do. I'm very interested to know. Though a 157X is probably not the best comparison to my 156 reg, but I still want to hear.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome