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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-08-2014 04:06 PM
andy_d Thanks guys for the tips. I thought it might also have to do with being generally in shape. I guess I have some work to do
03-06-2014 02:24 PM
killclimbz It's just about keeping your body tuned. If you are dehydrated it just compounds the problems.
03-06-2014 02:00 PM
xIceHoundx I am a medic in the army and have spoken with a provider on the subject since I have a buddy who gets alt sickness issues at certain places we ride and one bit of advice that he gave and my buddy tried was taking Ibuprofen 4 hours prior to climbing alt and every 6 hours during. Also proper hydrating, limiting things like coffee and energy drinks, and alcohol is another thing to avoid
03-06-2014 01:31 PM
Noreaster Read this

Optimize your Health at Altitude and avoid Altitude Sickness

in fact the entire site is quite illuminating on the subject to anyone who's interested.
03-06-2014 12:22 PM
MeanJoe I agree with Argo, sounds like physical conditioning vs. true altitude sickness. I get the double-whammy every time I go out west and board in the altitude:

1.) Physical conditioning - I'm somewhere between "needing a stick to reach my ass to wipe" and "carry a few more pounds than I should but active". I get shortness of breath, muscle fatigue faster than usual, and even on a few runs when I was really working it hard those wonderful little sparkles in my vision. Only thing that helps is slowing down and taking it easier for a few days.

2.) Altitude Sickness - I also usually come down with a moderate case of AS. Debilitating migraines, vomiting, etc. Every time I've been to Breckenridge I've lost 12 hours or so huddled in bed with a pillow over my head and convinced I'm about to die. Of course I also end up feeling like I can't breath or am not getting enough oxygen which causes added freak-out and more misery.

Question - I've heard everyone give the hydrate advice and I agree staying hydrated is important BUT... how exactly does that help with altitude acclimation? I was told that drinking a lot of water doesn't actually do anything for acclimation but it is always a good idea just to stay hydrated.

MeanJoe
03-06-2014 10:11 AM
cbrenthus
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy_d View Post
For Aspen, there wasn't really any specific besides riding some powder which can be workout itself though

In both occasions I would wake up with bloody noses in the morning. Bloody nose in the morning is a common occurrence when I stay for a weekend at a resort
The air is dryer at altitude. As mentioned, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Over drink water a bit. You want your pee to be clear, any yellow and you need more water. And that's not a bad way to live everyday anyway. Doesn't hurt to throw some occasional electrolytes in there as well (gatorade, powerade, etc).

Also, as mentioned a little cardio goes a long way, even just 10-20 minutes a day of getting your heart and breathing rate up and you'll probably see a big difference.
03-06-2014 10:07 AM
Argo
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy_d View Post
For Aspen, there wasn't really any specific besides riding some powder which can be workout itself though

In both occasions I would wake up with bloody noses in the morning. Bloody nose in the morning is a common occurrence when I stay for a weekend at a resort
Bloody noses is from the drier air and breathing at a higher respiratory rate than normal. It dries out your mucous membranes faster as well as all the other skin on your body.

The fact that I live and work at altitude, seeing patients with true AS on a daily basis, is exactly why I know I'm right. When I travel above 13k' I get the same shortness of breath while hiking or skinning, only skinned that high once.... Every 15 steps feels like I ran 100 yards.... It's because I could be in better cardio shape for that.

Look up the workout level of actively snowboarding, it's one of the more strenuous activities, throw pow in that and it's a workout for sure.....
03-06-2014 07:05 AM
killclimbz *facepalm* I didn't even think of that. Op you are unclean...

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03-06-2014 07:02 AM
mojo maestro Pretty sure you have the "cooties".
03-06-2014 07:01 AM
killclimbz I agree with Argo this sounds more like a conditioning thing than a classic case of AS. You don't get progressively worse AS heading down hill.

Op, I would try ramping up your cardio. A little will probably go a long way.

Don't show up on your trip and party your brains out the night before. Have a couple but also hydrate. Make sure you eat in the morning before you go out.

When you are short of breath either stop or slow your pace down to where you can catch up. I do the latter all the time on the skin track. That way I don't stop but I can recover a little.

Oh yeah did I mention the part about staying hydrated? Make sure you get plenty of fluids throughout the day. Some snacks can help too. Energy bars, gel blocks, gu shots can all give you a quick pick me up when you feel run down. Plus they are easy to carry in your pocket.

Finally don't over exert yourself to keep up with your buddies. Stick to your pace. Running ragged probably causes more issues than anything. You are in a mountain environment. Things are just a bit harsher in that setting.

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